Netis PL7500 Kit AV500 Powerline Adapter Kit Review

by - 6 years ago

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Introduction and Specifications


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Powerline Network adapter are an amazing invention that can help you bring network to corners of your compound that otherwise wouldn’t be possible and today I’m taking a closer look at Netis’ PL7500 Kit containing two PL7500 AV500 Powerline adapters.

You might be living in a rented place where you aren’t allowed to drill holes through all the walls to lay down wired network cables and wireless signals might not be able to penetrate everywhere. That is where Powerline adapters come into play as they extend your local network by using the wiring in your electrical installation.

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The Netis PL7500 adapters don’t require any configuration and work right out of the box. They’re also compatible with other Home Plug AV compatible products. The protocol in itself can achieve a connection with 500Mbps, but the adapters only come with 100Mbps RJ45 LAN ports creating a natural limit there.

There are both EU and UK versions available and the one I’ve tested here is the one with UK plugs. The installation couldn’t be any simpler as you just have to plug-in the two connectors and connect the LAN ports to the systems or switches that need to be connected.

With a range of up to 300 meters, there shouldn’t be many places within your home that you can’t reach and connect with these adapters.

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Netis has created some very stylish and pretty small units, and they didn’t even get very hot under use. You could feel the heat, but nothing that would be worrying for such a device. The almost egg-shaped adapters will blend in well in any home and you’ll forget that you even own them once set up.

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The big button on the front can be used for quick and easy encryption of the connection. Press a button for 2 seconds and do the same to the next adapter and the connection is established and secured with 128-bit AES encryption.

Netis also made sure that the units won’t use more power than needed as they’ll enter a power saving mode if no data has passed through it for a while and only wake again when needed.

Features and Specifications

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Packaging

The Netis PL7500 Kit comes in a good-looking and colorful package that already displays all the vital information on the front. The rear provides more details information on both functions and layout.

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Within the package, you’ll find two ethernet cables, a quick-installation guide, and a manual and tool disk. If you shouldn’t have an optical drive at your disposal, then you can also download the tool and manual from Netis website.

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Software


Once you have installed and launched the Netis PLC Utility you might think that it doesn’t work, but it does. It will need a few second to scan the network and find all powerline adapters that are connected. In this case a local and a remote device, both from this kit.

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You can view more detailed information on both the system and the adapters.

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Configuring the network name and devices is done under the Device Setup and you can also set the Multicast Address here.

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The firmware of devices like this sometimes needs an update and while there weren’t any newer ones available now, it’s great to have the feature for the future. You can also reset the adapters and set VLAN tags.

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Test Method & Utilities


Test system:

We would like to thank be quiet!, Supermicro, Intel, Corsair, Kingston, Sapphire and Lian Li for supplying us with our test system components

Receiving system:

  • ASRock FM2A88X Extreme6+
  • AMD A10-7850K
  • EVGA GeForce GTX980 SC
  • Corsair XMS3 8GB 1600MHz
  • OCZ ARC100 240GB

Software used:

  • PCMark PerforamanceTest 8.0

There only is one factor that is important when testing a device like this, and that is throughput. To test this, I’m using PCMark PerformanceTest that allows me to set both static and variable package sizes and test both the UDP and TCP protocol at the same time.

To further add a variation to the data set, I’ve tested the adaptors at a varying range throughout my apartment where medium range is an estimated 20m cable distance and long range is an estimated 60m cable distance; the furthest I can go in my apartment.

Usually, I would compare it to a direct Gigabit Ethernet connection, but as these adapters only feature a 100Mbit plug, there isn’t really any point. It would only screw with the charts by creating a comparable way too high value.

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PCMark: TCP Performance


The PassMark Advanced Network Test, a part of PerformanceTest, is designed to test the data transfer rate between two computers both of which must be running PerformanceTest. One of the computers acts as the server and will wait for a connection while the other computer acts as a client.

Fixed Block Size

To test the maximum throughput speed that a wireless connection can handle, a fixed block size of 16384 Bytes is sent from the client to the server over a period of five minutes. The higher block size will allow the transfer rate to stay as high as possible – in the same way that large files transfer from one drive to another quicker than lots of small files of the same total size.

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Variable Packet Size

In a real world situation, the blocks of data that pass through a wireless adaptor are not of the same size each time, so to give a more realistic impression of how an adaptor performs, the adaptor is once again tested at each range for a period of five minutes. This time however, the block size will vary from 32 Bytes up to 16384 Bytes in increasing steps of 148.7 Bytes each time.

Netis_PL7500_Kit-Benchgraph-tcp_variable

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Verdict

The TPC protocol only managed to provide us with about 40 Mbps at the best of cases. It isn’t an impressive result in itself, but it would be more than enough for surfing the web and streaming media.

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PCMark: UDP Performance


The PassMark Advanced Network Test, a part of PerformanceTest, is designed to test the data transfer rate between two computers both of which must be running PerformanceTest. One of the computers acts as the server and will wait for a connection while the other computer acts as a client.

Fixed Block Size

To test the maximum throughput speed that a wireless connection can handle, a fixed block size of 16384 Bytes is sent from the client to the server over a period of five minutes. The higher block size will allow the transfer rate to stay as high as possible – in the same way that large files transfer from one drive to another quicker than lots of small files of the same total size.

Netis_PL7500_Kit-Benchgraph-udp_fixed

Netis_PL7500_Kit-Chart-UDP_fixed

Variable Packet Size

In a real world situation, the blocks of data that pass through a wireless adaptor are not of the same size each time, so to give a more realistic impression of how an adaptor performs, the adaptor is once again tested at each range for a period of five minutes. This time however, the block size will vary from 32 Bytes up to 16384 Bytes in increasing steps of 148.7 Bytes each time.

Netis_PL7500_Kit-Benchgraph-udp_variable

Netis_PL7500_Kit-Chart-UDP_variable

Verdict

The UDP protocol showed us some better figures and most tests reached close to the 100Mbps that our plugs can perform with. 95Mbps is a good result here.

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Final Thoughts


Pricing

There isn’t any US version available and as such we can’t provide an US price either this time. But there is an EU and a UK version. You can for example find the Netis PL7500 Kit at Amazon for £37.50 or Jacob Elektronik Direct for €48.10.

Conclusion

Netis has created a couple of beautiful Powerline adapters with their PL7500. The egg-shaped devices are a lot smaller than the ones we’ve tested previously and would fit well into futuristic homes as well as 70-themed and more classical environments. Once it’s plugged in, it’s configured and out of sight and you might very well forget that you have installed it.

The performance was okay; It wasn’t great but it wasn’t bad either. We saw a throughput of around 40Mbps with TCP transfers and up to 95Mbps with UDP transfers. This isn’t record breaking, but it should be more than enough for surfing and streaming.

If you aren’t allowed to drill holes in your apartment or house, or the wireless strength isn’t enough to reach the far ends of it – then a Powerline Adapter Kit is just the right thing for you. The plug and play usage makes it so simple that anyone can do it, at least anyone that is capable of plugging the adapter into an outlet.

Pros:

  • Great design
  • Power efficient
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Only using 100 Mbps ports

“The Netis PL7500 Kit would be great for web surfing or streaming from locations where your usual network won’t reach.”

Bang-For-Buck

Netis PL7500 Kit AV500 Powerline Adapter Kit Review

Thanks to Netis for providing us with this sample.

Article Index

  1. Introduction and Specifications
  2. Software
  3. Test Method and Utility
  4. PCMark: TCP Performance
  5. PCMark: UDP Performance
  6. Final Thoughts
  7. View All

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