Cyberpower Infinity X55 Pro Gaming PC Review

Introduction


Cyberpower is one of most respected system integrators worldwide and quickly gained a superb reputation for their commitment to impeccable customer service. The company’s vast buying power means consumers can choose from a massive range of components and construct a system which suits their individual requirements. This level of flexibility is astounding and ensures the end-user receives a product with the best possible specification. Upgrades are listed using high-resolution images and include a brief outline of the pricing variation when selecting various parts. Of course, there are pre-configured options with a default configuration to help simplify the buying process. Cyberpower’s slick website manages to catch your imagination and become fascinated by the company’s custom PC range.

The latest PC to arrive for review purposes is the Cyberpower Infinity X55 Pro sporting an Intel i5-6660K processor, 8GB DDR4 RAM and XFX AMD Radeon R9 390 8GB. Cyberpower has utilised the Corsair H55 all-in-one CPU cooler to achieve a hefty 4.5GHz overclock. In terms of storage, there’s a high-performance 240GB SSD and 1TB mechanical disk. The Corsair VS 650W is a non-modular 80 plus white power supply with enough wattage to easily cope with demanding applications. This impressive specification is housed in the extremely unusual Corsair 600C chassis. Priced at £999, I’m fascinated to see the performance numbers in relation to other products under the £1000 mark.

Specifications

  • Name: Cyberpower Infinity X55 Pro
  • Case: Corsair 600C
  • Motherboard: MSI Z170A SLI Plus
  • Processor: Intel Core-i5 6600K Overclocked to 4.5GHz
  • Processor Cooler: Corsair H55
  • System Memory: Corsair 8GB (2x4GB) DDR4 LPX 2400MHZ
  • Main Boot Drive: Corsair Neutron XT 240GB
  • Additional Storage Drive(s): Western Digital 1TB 7200RPM
  • Graphics card: XFX AMD Radeon R9 390 8GB
  • Power Supply: Corsair VS 650W
  • Peripherals: N/A
  • Monitor: N/A
  • Optical Drive: N/A 
  • Wireless: N/A
  • OS: Windows 10 Home
  • Warranty: 3 Year Labour, 2 Year Parts, 1 Month Collect and Return plus Life-Time Technical Support
  • Price: £999

Packing and Accessories

The system arrives in a humongous outer box which offers exceptional protection during transit. More specifically, the thick cardboard adds rigidity and prevents the system from encountering cosmetic imperfections. On another note, the fragile notice instructs the courier to adopt a careful approach when handling the package.

Once opened, the main chassis box is held in place with supporting foam inserts and the accessories box. As a result, the unit shouldn’t move around in a brash manner.

Prior to turning on the system, a precautionary label is used to cover the power supply and inform the user to remove any internal packaging.

Here we can the huge array of protective inserts which cushions the key components from any sudden impact during delivery. These are absolutely essential additions to ensure the system arrives safely and without any cables being misaligned. Honestly, I’d prefer Cyberpower to use a foam pack instead because of the harder material and more secure positioning.

The system is bundled with a handy troubleshooting guide, component documentation, driver’s disk, PCI brackets where the GPU has been installed, power cord and SLI bridge. Unfortunately, the troubleshooting guide was placed underneath the chassis box which led to some hefty creases.

CPU-Z

GPU-Z

XFX Radeon Pro Duo Pictured & Priced!

In just under 10 days, users will finally be able to purchase their very own dual Fiji GPU. From launch, the Radeon Pro Duo would come out to a lofty $1,499 USD but given exchange rates, those in Spain will have to shell out 1696 EUR. In addition to some local pricing information, we’re also getting treated to some very nice pictures and more detailed physical specifications for the top end Radeon.

First off, confirmation has been given about the clockspeed of the dual-Fijis as 1000Mhz. This slightly lower than the FuryX which runs at 1050Mhz but the removal of PCIe latency should offset this. Memory stays the same at the standard 500Mhz though overclocking that shouldn’t be hard. Exact dimensions are 28.1 x 11.6 x 4.2 cm (length, width, height), with a 120mm as well. No word yet on the length of the tubing.

The biggest surprise is the display output which AMD told us was 4 DisplayPorts. We’re finding out now that it’s actually only 3 DisplayPort 1.2 and 1 HDMI 1.4a. Perhaps AMD misspoke display ports for DisplayPorts. Either way, it remains to be seen how well the card will sell given the hefty price tag and how close Pascal and Polaris are. Even with a strong showing from the next-gen card, though, the Radeon Pro Duo may remain the fastest single card solution.

AMD Partners Release Radeon R9 390 4GB Variant

AMD is expanding its Radeon mid-range graphics cards by releasing a 4GB variation of the Radeon R9 390 through its AIB partners Sapphire, XFX, and PowerColor (via Chinese sites EXPreview and JD.com). The company hopes that the 4GB version, a variant on the 8GB original, will help it compete against NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 970 and below.

The new Radeon R9 390 variants sport the Grenada PRO GPU and 4GB GDDR5 memory. The 4GB could be considered R9 290 rebrands were it not for 10% faster clock speeds.

Sapphire Radeon R9 390 4G D5 Platinum Edition OC

Sapphire’s R9 390 is overclocked by 10MHz, has a triple-slot Dual-X cooler, and features a backplate and reference PCB.

XFX Radeon R9 390 4GB ‘Black Wolf’ Double Dissipation

The XFX ‘Black Wolf’ has been overclocked by 15MHz, features a custom PCB, and a Double Dissipation cooling system.

PowerColor ‘Dataland’ Radeon R9 390 4GB

PowerColor’s ‘Dataland’ card is the first triple-fan 4GB R9 390, while its cooling is so efficient its fans will not engage until the GPU hits temperatures of 62oC.

EXPreview has put the cards through their paces, comparing them to the similar R9 290, showing the new variants to be up to 10% faster the old card.

There is no news yet on international release dates for the Radeon R9 390 4GB variants.

AMD Radeon R9 380X Release Date and Price Revealed?

Just last month, we heard that the AMD R9 380X was on its way, as a cards specifications, as well as a picture of the card from XFX leaked online. The new AMD card, although admittedly I use the term “new” lightly, looks set to topple the Nvidia Geforce GTX 970, offering impressive performance at a mighty affordable price range, which should make it ideal for 1440p gaming.

The new card features a 28nm chip, with a clock of up to 1100Mhz, 4GB of GDDR5 @ 5500Mhz – 6000Mhz and a 256bit bus. Of course, the specifications seem decent enough and no doubt a few AMD partners such as XFX, Sapphire, Gigabyte and Powercolor will put their own touch of magic in there to get the most of the card using custom cooling and PCB solutions; my money is on Sapphire putting out the best card of the bunch, as we’ve seen so many times with AMD cards in the past.

The card is expected to launch in just a few days time, November 15th to be exact, to the general public. Of course, this is just a rumour at this time, but Hardware Battle have proven a reliable source of leaks in the past.

What’s more exciting, is that the card is expected to retail at just $249, much lower than the GTX 970, which are often north of $300.

Are you looking forward to the R9 380X?

XFX Brings Back Blower Style R9 390X

When AMD first launched their R9 290 and 290X GPUs back in 2013, many had mixed feelings for the blower style cooler. While the cooler was one of the best efforts yet from AMD, it was not enough for the hot Hawaii chips, leading to high temperature, throttling and noisy operation. In the end, many opted for custom coolers which were not blowers and did a better job at cooling. Two years later, it looks like XFX is planning on releasing the 390/X series cards equipped with what appears to be the original 290X cooler.

Using the Grenada core, the R9 390X is fundamentally the same as the 290X, with maybe better binning and process improvements to differentiate them. XFX is also using the older cooler and not the revamped one AMD launched with the R9 390X in a while ago. The new 390X blower cooler take’s its design cues from the Fury X and Nano. Given XFX’s choice of using the 2013 cooler and not the 2015 model, either XFX has a lot of stock left or there is little difference between the 2015 and 2013 models. You can check out the 2015 model below.

There is undoubtedly a market for blower style GPUs as they tend to exhaust more of the GPU heat out of the case. This is especially important for SFF and builds with poor case cooling. If the cooler is still lacking though, there won’t be many users who will pick it up. The biggest advantage is that with a reference board, watercooling blocks will be easier to source. It will be interesting to see how well the blower card does, both performance and sales wise.

XFX Pro850W Black Edition Fully Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction & Packaging


Today we’ll be taking a look at one of the latest power supplies from XFX, a PRO850W Black Editon unit designed for high-end gaming systems and workstations. It ticks a lot of the right boxes that most people are looking for when buying a PSU, as it comes from a well-known and trusted brand name, offers plenty of power for a dual GPU configuration, 80 Plus Gold efficiency, fully modular cables, Japanese capacitors and more.

The unit comes well equipped with high-end features, which means I’m expecting nothing short of excellent performance from it. It promises high-end thrills and performance, so that’s exactly what it has to deliver in our tests. So let’s stop beating around the bush and take a closer look at what this unit has to offer, before firing it up on our load tester.

The packaging is very nicely designed, with a clear image of the PSU on the front, as well as a quick run down of the main specifications.

Around the back, a more detailed explination of the general design, such as the SolidLink Connectors that keep the interior of the PSU neat and tidy; this helps greatly with airflow and cooling.

In the box, you’ll find the usual power cable, some mounting screws and the user manual.

XFX Plans Water-cooled AMD Radeon R9 Fury

AMD has been jumping right onto the water-cooling bandwagon lately with their reference cards. Both the R9 295X2 and the R9 Fury X featured superb liquid-cooling in order to keep their hot chips cool. Even Nvidia cards have seen some liquid cooled options like the MSI Sea Hawk 980Ti. Now XFX is joining in with their own liquid-cooled solution for the R9 Fury.

Based off the same Fiji die as the Fury X, the Fury features a cut-down version with only 3,584 stream processors. Despite this, the Fury performs quite close to its older sibling. Another differentiator is that the Fury X is non-customizable by the AIB partners, meaning the stock liquid cooling cannot be changed. With the Fury though, AIB partners are free to do what they want and it looks like XFX has gone this route.

XFX has pretty much taken a Fury X card but swapped out the chip for the Fury and overclocked it. Essentially, this is what you would get when you buy a Fury X but with the Fury inside instead. This is quite interesting as the other Furys have all been air-cooled so far. This card will have to navigate the narrow gap between the Fury and Fury X in order to be viable. It will be interesting to see where XFX will price this card.

Thank you Videozardz for providing us with this information

XFX XTR 550 Fully Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction


One of the latest XFX power supplies is on our test bench today, bringing 550W of power as well as 80 Plus Gold efficiency to your system, making it a solid contender for most mid-to-high end gaming PC’s. Many people think they need 1000W plus from their PSU, but that simply isn’t the case, with most high-end single GPU systems rarely drawing more than 400-500W from the wall. Being a Seasonic manufactured unit, I’m expecting great things from the XFX XTR Series 550W PSU.

 “Designed for serious gamers and DIY professionals, the XFX XTR Series 550W Full Modular 80 Plus Gold power supply delivers the clean and stable power required for demanding gaming rigs and workstations. A single strong 12V rail flexibly routes the maximum available power to the parts, enabling you to maximize power usage and making setup easy. It’s also been awarded the 80Plus Gold certification for its high power efficiency, and is also designed for NVIDIA SLI and AMD Crossfire multi-GPU systems, making it a perfect solution for hardcore gamers. Its modular design reduces cable clutter. And the large fan delivers silent cooling, so your computer and PSU can operate at peak performance.”

Equipped with a powerful single +12V rail configuration, modular cables, CrossFire/SLI compatibility, Haswell support and much more, this is certainly a capable unit for a wide range of systems. Of course, you’ll also find it comes equipped with all the latest safety features, as well as high-quality Japanese capacitors, which should allow for clean and stable power delivery.

As with many Seasonic manufactured units, this PSU also comes equipped with a Hybrid Fan, allowing you to switch between always on cooling and a semi-passive mode, perfect for those who desire maximum performance or silent operation.

  • EasyRail Plus Technology allowing plenty of wattage headroom to handle your devices
  • Hybrid Fan Control allowing the power supply to operate silenty until it reaches 20% load or 25C
  • Ultra Quiet Fan Design
  • Ultra Voltage Regulation Design
  • Haswell Ready
  • AMD Radeon CrossFire Ready
  • NVIDIA GeForce SLI Ready
  • Multiple PCI-E 6-Pin and 6+2Pin connectors
  • True Wattage guarantee
  • 80 Plus Gold certifying 90% power efficiency
  • Extreme heat tested capacitors

The packaging is very nicely designed, with some stylish images on the box as well as a rundown of the major features, such as Haswell Ready, Japanese Caps, SLI/CrossFire and 80 Plus Gold efficiency.

Another important feature on the back, the True Wattage Guarantee, always a reassuring thing to see and something we’ll certainly hope to see in our test results.

In the box, you’ll find a durable power cable, some mounting screws and a user manual, nothing too fancy, but it’s everything you’re going to need.

PowerColor and XFX Prep AMD R9 Fury GPUs

Over the next few weeks, both PowerColor and XFX are expected to launch their own R9 Fury GPUs. Based off AMD’s cutdown Fiji die, the Fury initially only launched with cards from ASUS and Sapphire. With AIB partners joining in, it looks like the supply issues behind the Fury may finally have been resolved.

First off, we have PowerColor’s card which has been revealed on their website. At 3584 shaders, 224 TMUs and 64 ROPs, the cut-down Fiji will be clocked at 1000Mhz with the 4GB of HBM untouched. Connectivity features 3 DisplayPort and 1 HDMI output. The card measures 320mm x 125mm x 45mm which is a tad larger than the Sapphire Fury Tri-X overall while only a bit longer than the ASUS Fury Strix. Like the aforementioned cards, the PowerColor features 3 fans which speaks to the level of cooling required for Fury.

Moving on, we have XFX’s implementation which is also based off 3 fans. Interestingly, it looks like the XFX model is essentially the same as the PowerColor one, at least judging from the heatsink and shroud. It may be that the two firms are using the same cooling solution from an OEM. Like the PowerColor, it looks to have 3 DP and 1 HDMI as well.

Rounding off the major partners, we still have no word yet from MSI nor Gigabyte about when their cards might arrive. Given that Sapphire and PowerColor are AMD exclusive partners, it’s not surprising that they are moving in ahead of the last two.

Thank you Videocardz for providing us with this information

XFX AMD R9 Fury X 4GB Graphics Card Review

Introduction


This is what we’ve all been waiting for, the R9 Fury X graphics card is finally here! This particular card has been given a lot of hype in recent weeks and months thanks to rumours and leaked performance benchmarks all pointing towards a ‘Titan X Killer’. These rumours shook the entire enthusiast market and resulted in NVIDIA fighting back with another high-end graphics card; the GTX 980Ti. With the dismissal of a reveal at Computex 2015 by AMD, NVIDIA got the upper hand with the launch of the GTX 980Ti. This meant a huge focus was looming over AMD at the PC Gaming Show event at E3. We covered the event and what it had to provide in terms of graphics cards here!

Previous to this, AMD held multiple conference calls and events to slowly unveil what they had planned for the GPU marketplace. The most notable nugget of information was the ‘Ace’ up AMD’s sleeve; High Bandwidth Memory (HBM). This is the idea of an engineer at AMD and has been in the pipeline for around 7 years. GPU memory technology up until now has been referred to as GDDR memory and in the most popular state, GDDR5 is the current standard of memory technology. HBM hopes to completely demolish what GDDR5 is and bring in a new standard; the key is in the name, High Bandwidth. Compared to traditional GDDR5, the bandwidth will increase from approximately 28BG/s per chip to over 1000GB/s per stack. The key difference between HBM and GDDR5 is the placement of the DRAM chips, in GDDR5, they are laid out around the GPU; in HBM, they are stacked directly onto the GPU die. This massively decreased distance to travel not only increases bandwidth, but also decreases the overall footprint of the PCB. One of the limitations with HBM however, is that HBM v1 will be limited to 4GB, or 1GB per stack; when compared to what NVIDIA has to offer or even the R9 390X, it doesn’t look very appealing.

In our recent news coverage, we have had to gather our information from other sources. This has led us to be portrayed as being critical to AMD due to only primary issues being brought forward. Problems such as poor HBM production speeds have affected the overall availability of the R9 Fury range, undoubtedly annoying water pump buzzing and what can only be described as a poor choice of review linking on the AMD Facebook page; have been the main stories, with very few pro-AMD articles. Due to the poor availability of the R9 Fury X samples, we were skipped over, however, we purchased our own and now we can figure out for ourselves if these issues are in fact issues at all.

The XFX box is very simplistic, with a diamond pattern in the background, it allows focus on the main points of the box.

Inside the box, we find a warranty card, driver disk, manual and screws.

The card is a lot longer than I thought it was going to be, despite all of the pictures I’ve seen already. It has a metal box frame across the entire card with soft touch panels on each side. It is completely closed off apart from a small gap where the pipes enter the card.

Along the top, we see both Radeon logos and the 2x 8pin PCI-e Power connectors; the Radeon logo on the side illuminates when turned on.

A key feature on the R9 Fury X is the load LEDs. These light up depending on how much load the GPU is currently under.


AMD have given the tubing and fan cable extra attention with the addition of dense weave sleeving.

It enters the card so you cannot see any heat shrink or fraying ends.

The radiator is a standard 120mm size design with an addition lip along the top; The OEM for the AIO cooler is Coolermaster.

At the business end of the card, we see no vents for air cooling. However, there is an etched Radeon logo should you forget the manufacturer. The card is also equipped with 3 x DisplayPort and 1 x HDMI.

Radeon R9 390X Teardown Reveals R9 290X

The new AMD graphics cards are almost here and as with most hardware launches, cards are already finding their way into the wild. Now it seems someone has taken their brand new XFX Radeon R9 390X to pieces and what they found was rather interesting.

The teardown of the new GPU revealed that the interior of the card is virtually identical to that of the current AMD Radeon R9 290X, confirming any rumours and speculation of the card in a rebrand of the current/last generation. However, it’s not all doom and gloom, as the new card features 8GB of Vram and higher clock speeds when compared with its 290X counterpart, so it is for all intents and purposes a better card, but how much better, remains to be seen.

390X

290X

What’s interesting, is that the BIOS for these new cards is already finding its way online, prompting some users to flash their 290X to a 390X, although at this early stage, I’m not sure that’s entirely a good idea.

Will you be buying one of these “new and improved” cards, or are you holding out for the new Fury series of cards, of which we do know are a fresh design?

Thank you Legit Reviews for providing us with this information.

XFX AMD 390X Unboxing Appears on Youtube

While most of the attention is focused on AMD’s upcoming Fury flagship, the regular Rx 300 series also set to get some new faces. Rumoured to be a largely the same as the current Rx 200 series of cards, images purporting to be an XFX R9 390X popped up on XFx’s R9 290X page. Now one lucky fellow has posted a unboxing video of his XFX 390X itself, reportedly from Best Buy of all places.

While the video is scant on details, the R9 390X logo and box art matches up well with the image from XFX’s site.There is a chance that this could be a sophisticated fake, but there are some reasons it might not be. If AMD is aiming for a hard launch on June 16th next week, retailers probably already have stock and all their POS systems ready for the cards. The card also reportedly cost $450 which is close to the $480 previous leaks have suggested. What probably happened is a hapless Best Buy employee  mistakenly placed the 390X out early or the store manager messed up by putting it on display early.

There have been scant details if the R9 390X will be a straight up rebrand of the R9 290X or would it feature a minor tweak. The mid range Tonga, set to replace the complete Tahiti line is based on GCN 1.2, an update from GCN 1.0. Code named Grenada, the chip powering the 390X might also see an update from GCN 1.1 to GCN 1.2. With less than a week to go, the wait shouldn’t be too bad for those waiting on AMD’s latest cards. For those that are impatient, MoNkEyHuGgEr369, the uploader might have some benchmarks coming soon.

XFX Radeon R9 390 Double Dissipation in Pictured!

Chinese forums have leaked what could be the first real photos of AMD’s upcoming Radeon R9 390 graphics card and it isn’t even a reference design. The XFX Radeon R9 390 is featured in two photos, one from the top and one from the side, and both sides give us some good clues that this could be the real deal and that the launch isn’t that far in the future.

There were no direct card specifications provided by the users who posted this, so it’s unclear whether it’s just an aftermarket cooler or if it’s also overclocked and enhanced over the reference. The power will be provided by an 8-pin and 6-pin power connector which points to a TDP of 300W. There is no physical crossfire connector which points to the continued use of their XDMA Crossfire technology.

The shroud seems to have gotten an upgrade from the previous plain black design and now features a diamond styled surface. Below is a summary of the specifications that have been leaked so far and expected prices, but we won’t know for sure until it’s released.

Thanks to WCCFtech for providing us with this information.

XFX R9 370 Specification and Release Date Leaked!

Update: AMD 300 series cards have now been delayed!

Today is a great news for leaked graphics card information, first we have the Titan X benchmarks and now the XFX Radeon R9 370 Core Edition has leaked!

It’s now rumoured that the first 300 series card to go into production is not a high-end card, but the Core Edition from XFX, which will start production after Chinese New Year. It is equipped with the Trinidad Pro processor and comes with a 256-bit interface in both 2GB and 4GB variants. The card will be powered by a single 6-pin connection and require between 110W and 130W. The XFX R9 370 Core Edition (R9-370A-ENF) will be equipped with a pair of Dual-DVI ports, a HDMI and a DisplayPort connection.

Beyond that, we can expect the R9 370X, which we expect to feature the Trinidad XT hardware, as well as a 370 Pro Edition; we’ll bring you more information on these as soon as we have it.

The XFX Radeon R9 370 Core Edition is expected to launch in April.

Thank you VideoCardz for providing us with this information.

 

8 GB XFX Radeon R9 290X Graphics Card Spotted

Eager to get your graphics card loving hands on more VRAM? Then check out one of the first 8GB R9 290X graphics cards from XFX! We’ve already heard that Sapphire, MSI and PowerColor are working on similar hardware, but the more manufacturers giving their hardware a VRAM boost, the better.

Images have leaked that show the popular XFX R9 290X sporting an 8GB sticker. It still looks like the previous card, with their lovely Ghost2 cooler, but with double the amount of VRAM of the old model. This is good news for those pushing for better 4K performance levels and should reap huge rewards for those running multi-GPU configurations.

Are you excited about 8GB cards, or are you currently happy with a 4GB (or less) GPU?

Thank you VideoCardz for providing us with this information.

Images courtesy of VideoCardz.

XFX TS650 650W Non-Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction & Packaging


XFX’s PRO Series of power supplies have become very popular among system builders and enthusiasts thanks to their solid quality and competitive pricing, however, the majority of the XFX PRO series of power supplies are only based on 80 Plus Bronze rated Seasonic platforms. With the TS series XFX is ramping up the quality from Bronze to Gold rated platforms that promise to offer better efficiency and higher quality power deliver.

As you’ll find with many mainstream power supplies, there is a fully wired design which serves the purpose of keeping costs down but also of eeking out every last drop of efficiency since fully wired PSUs tend to have greater efficiency than modular ones. Yet the efficiency of this PSU is still fairly high-end so XFX have offered some cables to match that: all of the cables are fully black except the motherboard 24 pin but that also has decent sleeving. Like all XFX power supplies the XFX TS 650 also carries with it an impressive 5 year warranty in case anything were to go wrong, but given the high quality components and construction associated with Seasonic OEM designs like this one we are expecting a very good power supply, so let’s see exactly how it performs in today’s review.

Packaging and Contents

The XFX TS 650 comes in one of the smallest boxes I’ve seen for a PSU of this wattage and quality, and this of course helps XFX keep costs down.

The back details XFX’s usual features such as their True Wattage Guarantee.

The accessory pack is basic: a user manual, some screws and a power cable are all included.

XFX PRO 1250W Black Edition Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction & Packaging


When you get into the 1000W or higher range of power supplies the number of competitors starts to tail off compared to the highly competitive sub-750W market. The 1000W+ power supply market is very niche and not many power supply vendors even bother producing power supplies with this much wattage, at least not for the consumer market. That said if you’re interested in a power supply with enough wattage to drive three or even four way graphics card set ups then your options are limited. Today we are looking at one of those limited options, the XFX PRO 1250W Black Edition fully modular power supply. Thankfully limited options doesn’t mean limited quality as XFX’s Pro 1250W Black Edition Power supply is one of the best offerings on the market. In XFX tradition the OEM producer is the legendary Seasonic and this power supply boasts some great features such as a hybrid fan mode, 80 Plus Gold efficiency and a fully modular design.

Packaging and Contents

The packaging reveals a striking image of the product as well as some details about the technologies this power supply uses. The SolidLink technology basically means the power delivery mechanisms are closer to the connectors so there is less room for electricity to be wasted as heat which creates inefficiency. The Hybrid fan cooling, activated by a simple switch, means that below a certain amount of load or certain temperature the power supply’s fan will not even turn on – minimising noise.

Around the back we find more of the same: some additional marketing material about how the key features work as well as a note about the 5 year warranty.

Included with the product is a PRO Series power supply brochure which details the other PSUs XFX make as well as a power plug that will be appropriate to your region.

XFX XTS 460W Passive Fully Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction & Packaging


We recently reviewed the XFX XTS 520 power supply which was an 80 Plus Platinum, fully modular and totally passive unit. Today we have another power supply from XFX’s passive XTS range and that’s the slightly lower wattage XTS 460W model. There aren’t too many differences between this 460W model and the 520W model other than we’ve got a few less watts to play with. On paper the XTS 460 offers the same 80 Plus Platinum efficiency, the same fully modular design and the same excellent build quality, thanks to Seasonic being the OEM responsible for this unit’s production. If the XFX XTS 520 is anything to go by then this unit will have fantastic performance across the board with a fairly premium price tag to match, so let’s begin this review by taking a closer look at the XTS 460.

Packaging and Contents

The packaging details some XFX power supply features such as the EasyRail technology which basically means everything comes on a single 12 volt rail. The XFX XTS 460 is Haswell ready as it has full support for the low power C6 and C7 sleep states.

Around the back we get details about XFX’s True Wattage guarantee which basically states that you can use the full 460W this power supply is rated for without any issues.

Included with the XFX XTS 460 is a fairly simple package: a user manual, some silver screws and a power cable for whatever region you buy it in.

XFX PRO 650W XXX Edition Semi-Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction & Packaging


XFX’s PRO series of power supplies are well renowned among the enthusiast community for their great performance and fantastic value for money. Anyone who’s ever heard about XFX’s current PRO series power supplies will know they are made by Seasonic – one of the primary reasons for their high build quality and great performance. The PRO series is divided up into three main categories: the Core Edition, the XXX Edition and the Black Edition. The Core Edition is 80 Plus Bronze with a non-modular design and is the cheapest, the XXX Edition is internally identical to the Core Edition but has a semi-modular design and so is a little more expensive. Finally the Black Edition is typically 80 Plus Gold, is fully modular, comes with a better fan and a hybrid fan option and is the most expensive of them all. To date we have reviewed the XFX PRO 650W Core Edition, the XFX PRO 750W XXX Edition and the XFX PRO 750W Black Edition. All three power supplies excelled in their own way thanks to XFX’s competitive pricing and Seasonic’s fantastic power supply quality and design. Today we have with us another XXX Edition power supply from XFX, more specifically the XFX PRO 650W XXX Edition. This power supply is targeting the more affordable end of the market with its modest 80 Plus Bronze certification and semi-modular design.

Packaging and Contents

The packaging details the single 12 volt rail design of this product as well as the 80 Plus Bronze certification and use of Japanese capacitors.

The back reveals an exploded view of the product and a detailed feature analysis.

Included with the XFX PRO 650W XXX Edition is a users manual, UK power plug (connector will vary by region) and four silver screws for securing the power supply into your case.

XFX and Eclipse Computers Booth at Insomnia i52

XFX and Eclipse computers are sharing a pretty cool booth here at Insomnia i52, it’s packed full of awesome gaming rigs from Eclipse Computers in a wide range of chassis such as the NZXT H440, the InWin 904 and the Aerocool DS Dead Silence Cube, giving visitors to the booth a great chance to see the kind of builds and quality they offer in their rigs.

They’ve got a triple  monitor gaming PC with a racing wheel setup too, but unfortunately for the XFX team someone got crazy and snapped the clams on the wheel, leaving it out of commission for a while… I didn’t even get a go on it before it broke!

They’ve rolled out their truly unique Type 01 Bravo chassis, the build is nothing fancy, but it does feature the gargantuan Radeon R9 295X2, a card that never fails to impress. While also having a range of XFX products such as their popular PSUs on display for you to come and check out.

XFX PRO 450W Core Edition Non-Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction & Packaging


When you’re building a budget system with fairly minimal power requirements you won’t really find wattages lower than 400-450W for a standard ATX power supply. While getting a cheap power supply may be important to ensuring you can keep costs of a system build down it is also important to remember that you still need a decent quality power supply: if it is stupidly cheap (<$20 or <£15) then chances are it is going to be nasty. That said this is the perfect scenario for something like XFX’s PRO 450W Core Edition power supply which we are testing today. Being a “Core Edition” XFX power supply that means it is both non-modular and Bronze rated making it the lowest cost of all XFX’s product stacks. Starting at just £35~ or $55 it certainly offers great value for money and a viable alternative to cheap unbranded power supplies that are likely to go kaput. Yet this power supply is still a fairly high quality Seasonic design and comes with an impressive 5 year warranty that you wouldn’t expect to find at such a price point. So let’s examine XFX’s PRO 450W Core Edition power supply more closely in today’s review.

Packaging and Contents

The packaging demonstrates XFX’s One Rail design, the efficiency certification and the use of Japanese capacitors.

Around the back we find a bit about XFX’s power supply design philosophy and mention of their 5 year warranty.

Included with this power supply is a user manual, four silver screws for mounting into a case and a power plug that should be appropriate to the region that you buy this unit in.

First Pictures of AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Graphics Cards

The first pictures of three new Tonga GPU graphics cards have been shown and as so often before, the guys over at Videocardz got the first scoop. We’re being presented with a few shots of the Radeon R9 285 series with cards from Sapphire , XFX and HIS Digital.

The new R9 285 will use the Tonge Pro chips, so we can most likely expect Radeon R9 285X to be based on the Tonge XT chip soon. All three new cards are short reference cards, but with custom dual cooler solutions.

They use the XDMA Crossfire so there is no need for bridges (and the pins for them). Connection wise we see the basic AMD setup of 2x DVI, 1x HDMI and 1x DisplayPort.

The actual specifications are still mostly rumours and speculations. We do know that it will have 2GB GDDR5 memory on a 256 bit interface, but besides that we’ll have to wait a little bit more. More should be known very soon as the launch is said to be only 2 weeks away.

The core clock is said to be 918 MHz and the memory clock will be 1375 MHz (5500 MHz effective), and a bandwidth of 176 GB/s. The full Tonga chip itself has the same number of unified cores as the Tahiti, but we don’t know how many the R9 285 will have.

Thank you Videocardz for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Videocardz.

XFX XTS 520W Passive Modular Power Supply Review

Introduction & Packaging


For PC users who are serious about noise there really is no alternative to a passive power supply. Sure there are power supplies on the market that operate incredibly quietly (such as Be Quiet’s Dark Power Pro range) and even power supplies that don’t spin up their fans until they pass a certain load amount, normally 40% load (Corsair’s AXi range for example). However, a fan is still a fan whichever way you butter it up and a fan means some noise irrelevant of how quiet that fan is.

Enter XFX’s latest passive range of power supplies dubbed the XTS series. Today we are checking out the XFX XTS 520 which is a totally silent, passively cooled 520W power supply with a fully modular design, 80 Plus Platinum certification and a 5 year warranty. This really is the bees knees of power supplies and while 520W may not sound like much, that’s easily enough to power a Core i7 4960X system with a GTX Titan Black and a tonne of hard drives or SSDs, lots of memory and a full sized ATX board. With that said the XFX XTS 520 is a power supply that is versatile enough for any system from a low-end workstation to a high-end gaming PC: you can even run SLI or CrossFire with this power supply.

As with all XFX power supplies the XTS 520 is based on a Seasonic OEM design: this means it is going to be a quality piece because Seasonic are one of the top vendors in the entire power supply industry. Let’s start this review by taking a look at the packaging of XFX’s XTS 520.

Packaging and Contents

The packaging features images of the product as well as all the relevant certifications of SLI, CrossFire, 80 Plus Platinum and the fact it is Haswell C6/C7 low power state ready.

Moving around to the back and we find that the packaging details more features about the power supply. XFX note the use high quality 105 degrees celsius rated Japanese capacitors which is always nice to see and reassures you about the quality of the product.

Included with the power supply is a brief user manual, four silver screws for securing into your case and an EU-style power plug. We expect that the power plug will reflect the region within which you buy the product (unless the retailer you buy from is selling imported stock from other regions).

6400×1080: Testing Mixed-Resolution AMD Eyefinity

Introduction


Around a month ago we announced to you that AMD was releasing version 3.0 of its Eyefinity software package. One of the key new additions to AMD’s Eyefinity 3.0 software is the ability to support mixed resolution monitors in an Eyefinity configuration through a variety of methods. This exciting addition means you can mix and match a variety of displays so there’s no reason to scrap any mis-matched monitors if you want to do multi-screen gaming.

Mixed resolution support will be implemented in three different ways: fill mode, expand mode and fit mode. The first of those, fill mode, utilises the full resolution of all displays but as a result of that the resolutions created are not quadrilateral (i.e. are not rectangular). The next mode, expand mode, creates a rectangular resolution based on the vertical pixel count of the highest resolution display and the combined horizontal width of all displays. The resulting area that the smaller displays cannot show is designated as “unavailable area” because the displays lack the resolution to project it.

The final method is fit mode by which the vertical pixel counts are kept constant across all three displays so it will use the maximum common vertical height. In the example below you can see that you’d end up with three 1080p height screens but the middle one becomes 2560 x 1080. This differs to previous Eyefinity where it would simply set the middle display to 1920 x 1080, now you can use the extra width by sacrificing the height which is preferable to sacrificing both.

To test out this new AMD Eyefinity technology AMD have sent us over the required monitors to run a 6400 x 1080 configuration. The first is the central 2560 x 1080 resolution display, for this AMD sent us the AOC Q2963PM 29 inch panel. Despite being a 29 inch panel, the vertical height is the same as a 23 inch 1920 x 1080 panel because remember panel height is measured diagonally, the extra width doesn’t make this display any taller. To go either side of the AOC Q2963PM AMD also sent us two NEC MultiSync E231W displays. Together these three panels form a 6400 x 1080 resolution with a uniform vertical height that makes it look like a natural combination. For testing this high-resolution set up we are testing it with XFX’s R9 290X Double Dissipation 4GB graphics card on our usual high-end graphics card test system. We were tempted to use CrossFire 290Xs but decided to opt for one card to keep the results as realistic and accessible as possible.

XFX Radeon R9 290X Double Dissipation 4GB GDDR5 Graphics Card Review

Introduction


AMD’s R9 290X is back in business when it comes to competing with Nvidia’s equivalents. The custom R9 290Xs easily beat out equivalently priced or sometimes even more expensive custom GTX 780s making them a solid proposition for any gamer on a budget but wanting maximum performance. Today we are looking a highly competitive R9 290X from XFX which has some of the most aggressive pricing on the market and is currently the cheapest R9 290X available in most markets by quite a significant margin, particularly in the USA where it can be had for just $450 at the time of writing which is $50 cheaper than the next cheapest R9 290X option. This means custom R9 290Xs are now $100 cheaper than MSRP pricing of $550 and XFXs option looks almost too good to resist. While XFX have lowered the price of their Double Dissipation SKU they have also recently added a “cherry picked” DD Black Edition skew with an additional 50MHz overclock and more overclocking potential, this will probably fetch slightly more than the model we are testing today but broadly speaking those cards are identical. We’ve already tested three R9 290Xs so I’ve got a pretty good idea about what makes a good one and what makes a bad one, with the reference design being the textbook definition of a bad one. Let’s have a look at XFX’s offering and see whether it sacrifices on anything to make it the cheapest R9 290X currently on the market!

 

Packaging and Bundle

The packaging is fairly simple and offers up a coupon code for Battlefield 4 as well as pointing out UEFI BIOS support and unlocked voltage.

The back details features a bit more but there isn’t really much to see.

Included is a variety of documentation and a driver CD.

Accessories include two power adapters, one is dual 6 pin to 8 pin and the other dual molex to 6 pin. You probably won’t need these if you’re buying this type of card.

XFX R9 280 Double Dissipation Black Edition OC 3GB Graphics Card Review

Introduction


The AMD HD 7950 was probably the best GPU of the entire HD 7000 series in my honest opinion. It offered stellar value for money for high performance gaming – often overclocking to HD 7970 levels for a much lower price. The HD 7950’s popularity then got the better of it as the card soared to mining fame being the GPU of choice for miners all over the world. The price of HD 7950s went through the roof before stock eventually ran out and people had to start turning to new and current alternatives like the R9 280X. However, the HD 7950 is back with a bang. Given the logical name of the R9 280 it carries the great features we grew to love on the HD 7950 but with a higher clock speed and slightly lower price than the R9 280X. Today we have with us a rather sexy looking R9 280 courtesy of XFX. We have with us the XFX R9 280 Double Dissipation Black Edition OC graphics card (R9-280A-TDBD) which is XFX’s cherry picked line. It features their dual 90mm fan cooler, has an overclocked frequency and has fully unlocked voltages on the core and memory for overclocking.

Specifications Analysis

Below you can see how XFX’s R9 280 stacks up against rival graphics cards. It holds a $20 premium over the reference card but comes with a memory and core overclock to give it some extra grunt.

Packaging and Bundle

The packaging comes with the usual style but has a new addition letting us know it is UEFI BIOS ready.

The back lists out the usual key features.

Inside we find a rather modest looking brown card box.

There’s the usual array of documentation including a warranty statement and driver CD.

The accessory bundle includes two power supply adapters (dual molex to 6 pin and dual 6 pin to 8 pin) and a CrossFireX bridge.

AMD XFX Radeon R7 250 Core Edition Passive 1GB GDDR5 Graphics Card Review

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging


While the low-end graphics card market is fairly monotonous, passive graphics cards always make for interesting system builds and the XFX R7 250 we have here today this is certainly no exception. The R7 250 from AMD offers a surprisingly punchy amount of performance for quite a modest price of just $90 and with low power consumption. XFX’s take on the R7 250 costs just $10 more than the MSRP and in return you get an awesome looking passive cooler but there is of course no factory overclock because taming heat is of the essence. XFX is targeting their R7 250 (R7-250A-ZLH4) at the gamer or HTPC user who wants a silent experience but with enough power to get involved with gaming or 4K playback. Unlike the R7 240 the R7 250 offers up almost twice the performance yet costs only $20 more, making it a viable gaming card for a user on a budget. The R7 250 does of course face stiff competition from the R7 250X which offers a substantial leap in performance for just $10 more but the R7 250 has the advantage of not needing supplementary power and being cool-running enough to facilitate a variety of passively cooled models.

Specifications Analysis

As we’ve mentioned the XFX R7 250 is clocked at stock speeds and is priced $10 higher. It is also worth noting that it uses only 1GB of GDDR5 which in my opinion is the best choice. XFX are not offering DDR3 models or variants with 2GB of VRAM which is a sensible decision – for this type of graphics card 1GB is ample. A technical detail worth noting is that XFX use the “new” Oland XT based R7 250, that is in contrast to the “old” Cape Verde Pro R7 250 which is based on the HD 7750. The HD 7750 variant is slightly faster but availability of these cards are quite scarce and so far I only see Sapphire offering Cape Verde Pro based R7 250s.

Packaging and Bundle

The packaging retain’s XFX’s usual styling and it points out the key feature – a passive 0 dB cooling solution with a 6mm heat pipe.

The rear details the card’s features.

Included with this card is a variety of documentation and a driver CD. There are no adapters, brackets or cables.