Internet To Leave US Control

While it is designed to be independent, avoiding control from any country of government the internet is a little bit different from that dream. Sadly, like with any large system, someone has to be there to help maintain and support the complexity of the system, something connecting the entire world is no different in this respect. Now, the Internet could soon be leaving US control.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is a non-profit company that manages internet protocols and domain names. With the ability to register custom domain names and with new protocols like IPV6, the internet is expanding with new services and systems taking up everything from bits to petabytes.

The transition from US control, if it goes ahead as planned, will change hands on September 30th. While there will be no change in the fundamental workings of the internet, the control that the US had will be gone leaving for a more global service, something that countries like Russia and China have been requesting goes to a global body like the UN.

Many who use the internet believe in a principle known as Net Neutrality. This principle is that all traffic on the internet, no matter the destination, content or type should be treated the same. This means that if you and your neighbour were both watching content, one football one League of Legends, neither of your connections would be chosen above the other. This leads to everyone and everything on the internet being treated, above all else, equally. Many countries don’t employ this, with giant firewalls and companies looking to find new ways to prioritise connections.

While sharing control all over the world is a good thing, making sure that people don’t use the new control to enforce restrictions, censorship or global monitoring is also important. The freedom of one cannot come at the cost of another.

HTTP/2, The First HTTP Update Since 1999, Is Complete

HTTP, the fundamental internet protocol used to transmit formatted data across the web, is getting its first update in 16 years. The new standard, HTTP/2, was completed on Wednesday, according to Mark Nottingham, Chair of IETF HTTP Working Group. After a series of editorial stages, HTTP/2 will be published as the new standard for websites and browsers across the globe, becoming the first update to the protocol since HTTP 1.1 back in 1999.

HTTP/2 should speed up page loading times, strengthen connections, and help servers push data to your cache. But the most important change, a burden on developers since the inception of the internet, is the introduction of multiplexing. Previously, multiple HTTP requests at once would slow servers down, sometimes preventing page loads altogether, but HTTP/2 will allow simultaneous requests with no slow-down.

Source: Gizmodo

CERN Commemorate 20 Years Of The WWW.

CERN has been at the forefront of technology an innovation for decades and it was 20 years ago this week that they laid the foundations for the world wide web as we know it. CERN had a major part in devising the fundamental principles and rules the govern how the internet works and they even had the first ever website, but it was sadly lost and forgotten over time as technology moved forward.

As their way of celebrating the birth of the internet and of course the advancements that have been made that have turned the internet into one of the most important tools of the modern age, CERN has reinstated the worlds first ever website.

Originally launched back in 1991, the website played host to a very simple page that hosted just a few bits of text which explained the basics of the World Wide Web, by today’s standards there isn’t much to look at, but for those passionate about how the internet works, this an amazing way to track back how far the internet has developed in the past twenty years.

CERN has managed to recover a copy of the site from 1992, although they are endeavoring to find an even earlier copy, even better still they have managed to restore the original web address, so its literally back as is was all those years ago.

Now you might be thinking,” hey Peter! 1991 and 1992 were more than 20 years ago!” and you’re right, the internet is older than 20 years, but it was 20 years ago that CERN did the most important thing in the history of the internet, they unleashed the technology behind the WWW, royalty free and from that, the web we know today was born.

The start of the internet http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html 1991 – 2013 and beyond!

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