Sega to Support Modding of Games via Steam Workshop

Steam used to hold a collection of games, both old and new, but with its constant updates and the ability to download the games on any internet connected PC, people love the new choices they’ve been given. This love only grows when you give them back a childhood classic, which for many are centered around the games that the Sega Mega Drive offered them, and Sega wants this to grow by supporting not just the games on Steam but also the modified versions that will be shared via Steam Workshop.

Steam Workshop is the user content sharing part of Steam, letting you add mods and tweaks that include the likes of replacing dragons with trains or a new map for your army to conquer. In this respect support for user-created content will be supported by Sega alongside the new Sega Mega Drive Classics Hub being released on Steam on April 28th.

Clearly designed for a VR generation, the hub will include the system being placed in a bedroom, much like the ones where you first encountered the games. With graphical enhancement filters, full controller and keyboard support and “spot-on emulation” listed in the release, you can replay Golden Axe, Altered Beast, Ecco and even Columns just like you did when you were younger.

Fallout 4 Official Modding Tools Release Date Revealed

Fallout 4 players have had no trouble surviving the harsh wasteland, fighting off everything from ex-government forces to giant irradiated mutant creatures. In their spare time, the wasteland doesn’t have to be a hostile place and some people have even taken to building with the recreation of the TenPenny tower being amongst the most noticeable. All of this is made even greater and more remarkable given that it is done without any real support, that is soon to change though as Bethesda have announced when they hope the full mod support will be available for Fallout 4.

In an interview with Game Informer, Todd Howard mentioned that “our goal is between the first two DLC’s” following up with “it’ll go up at that time on PC in April. All of that stuff will go up on PC. People are beta testing it”.

The first two DLC packs for Fallout 4 will be titled the Automatron and Wasteland Workshop. Revealing more details on these Howard mentioned that Automatron has “a little quest line and this Pokémon-esque ‘kill robots, get their parts, build your own’ [gameplay]. The robot building is really deep”. Laser guns and mini nukes just weren’t enough, you need your own robot too apparently in the wasteland.

The Wasteland Workshop will be there so you can “build your own arenas, capture animals, and also build other things”, offering those of you who prefer creation over destruction a short reprieve before walking out into the sand with your robot followers.

Survival mode, a highly rumoured feature, has also had some secrets revealed, with the lack of saving (unless you are sleeping), the removal of fast travel, a bucket load of diseases and the combat getting a whole new feel, instead of being just a “bullet sponge” experience.

Steam Controller and Workshop Support Added to Warframe on PC

Earlier this week we saw the launch of Steam Machines (at last!) and that means that Steam OS, the Steam Controller and more are all now fully out in the world and ready for people to use. To celebrate this, Warframe developer Digital Extremes have update their AAA Free-to-Play title to support it.

Warframe now supports the official Steam Controller, which is great news for those using it on PC or those who are using a Steam OS powered Steam Machine. Even cooler than that, the game now supports Steam Workshop, opening up the doors for a huge range of user-created content. Meanwhile, the developer is promising to tweak and update both of these new features based on player feedback.

“We’re always looking for new and exciting ways to support and encourage players’ interests in becoming more involved with Warframe,” said Rebecca Ford, Community Manager at Digital Extremes. “The quality level of this first round of beautifully created user-generated content from our Community is beyond impressive and is the beginning of what we hope will grow into a thriving resource for both creators and players. TennoGen truly delivers content made by Tenno, for Tenno.”

Gamers not as artistically inclined but interested in participating in the process are encouraged to vote on early submissions they’d like to see in Warframe on the official TennoGen Steam Workshop website.

For more details on the submission process for user-made TennoGen content, please visit the Steam Workshop FAQ on the officialWarframe forums.

Warframe is available for free download on PC, PS4 and Xbox One. To find out more about Warframe here.

Grand Theft Auto V Realistic Vehicle Mod Pack is Now Available!

Grand Theft Auto V’s active community has produced a wide array of unusual character mods and custom vehicle designs. However, for the less-experienced user, applying each individual mod can be a laborious process. Thankfully, YouTube user, SteamLOL has compiled a number of user-created vehicle mods into a handy downloadable package. The collection features more than 50 highly-detailed authentic vehicles from manufacturers like Pagani and Mitsubishi.

Please note to install the mod pack, you will need to acquire OpenIV and then download the vehicles from here. The installer creates a backup of the default car setups incase any data becomes corrupt. The collection has an abundance of hypercars but lacks the typical road vehicles. This is a shame as I’d like to see affordable cars from Kia and Vauxhall on the streets too just to mix things up a bit.

Despite this, I’ve always loved to put real vehicles in Grand Theft Auto which adds to the game’s atmosphere and creates a more realistic tone. I’m also impressed with the interiors which are modeled superbly and make each vehicle a joy to drive. Hopefully, more car packs can be released in the future.

Have you installed any mods for GTA V yet?

Thank you The Dark Side of Gaming for providing us with this information.

Forget The Selfie Stick – Get Me My Photo Plate!

Technology and science go hand in hand, and some say that cooking is just another science, one more in touch with art and taste than maths. In recent years it has been common for people to take pictures of their meals before enjoying them but is making a special plate just to take a picture just a little too much?

Created by both Israel’s Camel Winery (interesting name right?) and Tel Aviv’s restaurant Catit, the Foodography workshop not only aims to satisfy your hunger with a five-course meal but to improve your photography skills while your eating.

Based around the use of two different plates, the Limbo (pictured above), and the 360 (pictured below), the patrons are trained by a photographer about how to capture their food for eternity. The Limbo is designed to allow the colourful food to stand out while also containing an area to stand your mobile phone ready to take a picture while also providing a stand to hold a light. The 360, however, is slightly different in that it’s designed for video capture. With another stand for your phone and circular dish, the 360 allows you to capture your food in its full glory. In the image below you can see it being used to capture as a circle of source is poured onto the plate.

Food looks nice, but I’ve never understood the fascination with taking pictures of it. On the other hand, good looking food does make you hungry and makes you want to eat it more so maybe this course isn’t all nonsense. The use of smartphones, letting everybody join into the course I think helps increase its appeal but at $155 (approximately £100) per head makes it a very pricey five-course meal.

Now if you don’t mind me, I’m feeling rather hungry.

Thanks to The Verge for their information. 

Images courtesy of PetaPixel

Black Mesa Steam Workshop Page Appears

Earlier this week, we brought you news that a mysterious timer had appeared on the Black Mesa website, settings the internet ablaze with rumour and speculation on what could be coming. We suspected that it would be the Xen Missions, which still seems like a likely candidate for when the counter strikes zero, but there’s already been some development on both the site and on the steam platform.

There are only a few hours left on the counter, but the site has already changed its tune from obscure noises, to an emergency broadcast which has me even more excited for what today’s big reveal could be!

To add to the excitement factor and admitted, possibly even spoiling what may be the whole thing, a page has appeared on Steam for the Black Mesa Workshop. Could this simply be the addition of the Xen levels, a major update to the engine, the retail version of the game or something else?

While I suspect this is a massive trolling, some plucky investigators have discovered the ASCII image you can see below in the BMRF.us website, right about a link to THREE.WebGLRenderer. Not what I wouldn’t call it the greatest clue ever, but I’m sure there’s still a few of you delusional enough to think that Half-Life 3 will ever see the light of day.

All eyes to Black Mesa for when the clock hits zero!

Gabe Newell Takes to Reddit to Answer Questions on Paid Mods

It has been one hell of a week for Valve, as their latest business move sent a shockwave through the PC gaming community and put bluntly, left a lot of people seriously p***** off. For those of you who missed this commotion, Stream Workshop now allows modders to sell their work, but it has left a bitter taste in the mouth of many gamers, as we’ve all become so accustomed to the well established and mostly free or donation based nature of the modding community.

“On Thursday I was flying back from LA. When I landed, I had 3,500 new messages. Hmmm. Looks like we did something to piss off the Internet. Yesterday I was distracted as I had to see my surgeon about a blister in my eye (#FuchsDystrophySucks), but I got some background on the paid mods issues. So here I am, probably a day late, to make sure that if people are pissed off, they are at least pissed off for the right reasons.” Said Gabe on reddit.

There does seem to be some confusion about the mods, that all mods are now paid for, which simply isn’t true. Free mods are still available on Steam Workshop and it’s really down to the content creator to add a price. Naturally, most have opted to try their hand at making a few bucks, but gamers are already voting with their wallets and keeping well clear of such thing anyway.

Gabe came under fire for content creators only getting 25% of the sale of their mods, with the remainder going to the games creator, for the case of Skyrim, this would be Bethesda and Gabe was quick to point out that this percentage was set by Bethesda, not Valve, as this rate will always be at the discretion of the publisher/developer; Gabe even went as far as saying he would be happy to tell a publisher they’re being dumb on the subject of this percentage.

What’s really good to see, is that Gabe has been taking on so many questions on steam and saying they’re absolutely looking to revise and improve the system and that him taking to reddit is just one of the first steps in that process.

“In general we are pretty reluctant to tell any developer that they have to do something or they can’t do something. It just goes against our philosophy to be dictatorial. With that caveat, we’d be happy to tell developers that we think they are being dumb, and that will sometimes help them reflect on it a bit. In the case of Nexus, we’d be happy to work with you to figure out how we can do a better job of supporting you. Clearly you are providing a valuable service to the community. Have you been talking to anyone at Valve previously?”

I would love to quote all the replies, but of course, it would make far more sense to read them on reddit, as Gabe really did spend a lot of time responding to virtually every question on there and it may help clear up many issues surrounding the new marketplace.

“Skyrim is a great example of a game that has benefitted enormously from the MODs. The option for paid MODs is supposed to increase the investment in quality modding, not hurt it. About half of Valve came straight out of the MOD world. John Cook and Robin Walker made Team Fortress as a Quake mod. Ice frog made DOTA as a Warcraft 3 mod. Dave Riller and Dario Casali we Doom and Quake mappers. John Guthrie and Steve Bond came to Valve because John Carmack thought they were doing the best Quake C development. All of them were liberated to just do game development once they started getting paid. Working at Waffle House does not help you make a better game.”

It’s good to see Gabe, who many of us PC gamers hold in the highest regard, being so hands on with the community and while the whole mod-payment thing has caused an internet outrage, feedback from Gabe and the community on reddit does seem to be improving as there’s been a fair amount of miscommunication until this point. People have been banned from Steam forums, had their message histories deleted for speaking out about this issue and Gabe has said this will stop, he was unaware of this and has even unblocked a few accounts of Steam members who posted such concerns on reddit. Admittedly, that part shouldn’t have happened in the first place, but at least the CEO is now addressing the issue.

“Our view of Steam is that it’s a collection of useful tools for customers and content developers. With the Steam workshop, we’ve already reached the point where the community is paying their favorite contributors more than they would make if they worked at a traditional game developer. We see this as a really good step. The option of MOD developers getting paid seemed like a good extension of that.”

You can check out the thread here, be sure to give it a good read first, field any questions you think should be addressed, if they haven’t been already and lets see if we, as the PC gaming community, can make this a better situation for both gamers and modders alike.

Unhappy Gamers Start Petition Against Paid Content in Steam Workshop

Valve is doing a lot of restructuring in Steam at the moment. First there was the added limitation for people who haven’t spent any money on the service and yesterday they announced that it now was possible for modders to set their own price for their work and sell it in the Steam Workshop instead of just sharing their work as it was up until now.

But it looks like a lot of users aren’t happy with this new addition to Steam and a user named Cyand Wondel started a petition on change.org to stop it again. The petition was started about 12 hours ago and over 15 thousand have already signed the petition out of the 25 thousand petition goal.

The comments people give on why they are signing the petition all look very similar, a fear that this could ruin a great modding community on Steam:

“This has the potential of ruining the mod community, it has to be stopped.”

“This should have never happened in the first place Valve. I mean no 1 would pay for this, they are not DLC’s they are mods and they are supposed to be free.”

“Many of the mods currently being sold require the Skyrim Script Extender and that team of people won’t be seeing a single penny from this the way you have it set up. Also modding is a hobby, not a career. You will ruin the modding community by going about this in the fashion that you are”

In short, the fear is that this could ruin the modding community as it is, by turning it into a marketplace rather than just a forum for sharing your own creations with fellow gamers and get some feedback on items that you’ve put so much work into.

But it isn’t an entirely new scheme from Valve, just an extension. People have already been able to sell items for Valve’s own games and it is estimated that 1500 users have made a total of about $57 million in these games over the previous three years.

What’s your take on Valve’s newest initiative, do you think it’s a good or bad thing?

Valve Restricts Steam Service Features to Users Who Don’t Spend At Least $5

If you’ve ever been bullied or targeted on Steam by spammers or phishers, then you might be excited to know that Valve has set some restrictions to its online service. Valve stated on their Support Page that they are adding this security measure to deal with the latter problems.

Therefore, if you would like to have full access to Steam as a new user or even as an old one who used the service only for Free-to-Play games, you need to spend some money to get the full features.

Valve says that if you add at least $5 on Steam Wallet it should get you access, regardless if you actually buy anything or not.

Other methods of unlocking your account(s) include purchasing games that are equal to at least $5, adding a Steam Wallet card to your Steam account or purchasing a Steam gift.

If you think that you can do something to get around this, you are out of luck. Valve says that activating a retail game, playing free demos, adding a non-Steam game, adding/playing trials, free-to-play games or activating promotional CD keys from GPU manufacturers (like the ones found on AMD cards) won’t get your features activated.

Now, moving to the thing that really matters. What is actually restricted? Well, the company seems to restrict pretty much every social communication in the service. You can’t add friends, open group chat, vote on Greenlight/Steam Reviews/Workshop, take part in the Steam Market or post often on Steam Discussions.

In addition to that, you can’t send anything to the Workshop, post in Workshop Discussions, access the Steam Web API, use the browser and mobile chat and on top of that, your Steam Profile will always have its level locked at 0.

Now the real kicker. Though Steam said a minimum of $5 (that is USD currency by the way), how will it work in other non-US regions? I’ll let you read their response below.

“If the Steam store isn’t in USD, we will track the purchase amount in USD by converting each purchase total made on Steam using daily exchange rates. Once you have made the equivalent of $5.00 USD or more in total Steam purchases, you will gain access to the restricted Steam features.”

So why do non-US countries have to pray for the US dollar to drop in value to not spend more than others? I mean, why not do this for all the currencies once you thought about adding the restriction? Let us know if you consider this fair or not in the comments below.

Pro Overclocker 8Pack Gives Overclocking Demo At The O2 Arena

Pro Overclocker 8Pack Gives Overclocking Demo At The O2 Arena


Amongst the global community of computer enthusiasts, there are many that dream of having a system that was faster but without having to pay high amounts of money in some cases to get just that. Fortunately for many people, the process of overclocking their systems comes straight to mind and with ease they are able to unlock some extra free performance from their existing components by a process of tweaking setting mainly in the system BIOS.

For a large majority of users however, the idea of doing just that or the thought of playing around in the systems BIOS without the knowledge of what to do is what holds them back and even with many online guides for overclocking available, sadly there’s not too many chances where some of these users get the change to get a workshop based look in to overclocking 101.

This week at the o2 arena in London, Students from all over the world have honed in on the area for a week long technology festival where they can get together with other like minded people and interact in the world’s biggest electronic entertainment event.

Campus Party is an annual week long, 24-hours-a-day technology festival where thousands of “Campuseros” (hackers, developers, gamers and technophiles), equipped with laptops, camp on-site and immerse themselves in a truly unique environment.

Recognized as the biggest electronic entertainment event in the world, Campus Party unites the brightest young minds in technology and science under the idea that “the Internet is not a network of computers, it’s a network of people.”

The festival features over 500 hours of talks, debates, workshops, competitions and hackathons related to science, innovation, digital entertainment and creativity. Additionally, hundreds of hours of ad-hoc events are planned by participants and continue throughout the night.

The overclocking workshop was undertaken by a group of of enthusiasts wh0 included Ian Cutress, the UK’s #1 enthusiast overclocker, Kenny ‘K404’ and finally Overclockers UK’s very own Ian ‘8Pack’ Parry. As part of the 101, the workshop was split into two parts with the first part relating to the fundamentals of overclocking – ie what it is, why we do it, what we need and most importantly how we do it and then a demo of overclocking a Haswell i7 4670k from its stock speed as far it will go in the Intel shipped stock cooler to demonstrate the need for superior cooling.

Asus were keen to pick up on the event and were kind enough to provide the kit for two overclocking setups using a Maximus VI Extreme, 8GB Patriot Black Mamba 2133Mhz memory, Intel i7 4760k and a GTX 760 Direct CUII. Power supply wise, at the heart of it was an Antec 1200W and Corsair AX1200i making sure that the power was clean and stable.

In the second session of the evening, the focus moved more towards extreme cooling and benching for world records. With 160l of fresh LN2 at the ready, the crowd quickly drew in to get a glimpse of what it takes to break a world record.

In the foreground 8Pack can be seen keeping both parts of his setup – which includes a 4770k running at 6.5GHz and a MSI GTX780 Lightning – running well below -100c in order to push for a new 3DMark05 record.

Stream Workshop Added To Orcs Must Die! 2, Steam Trading Cards Coming Soon

Robot Entertainment today announced that Orcs Must Die! 2 now supports Steam Workshop and will soon be getting Steam Trading Cards! When it released last summer, Orcs Must Die! 2 gave players a broad new Spellbook filled with original and classic traps, each with unlockable upgrades. Robot Entertainment is now giving War Mages the tools to expand their magical arsenal even further.

Have you been yearning for a crossbow that shoots freezing bolts? Now you can make one. Craving a special tar trap for the Sorceress? You’ve got it. Combine all of the game’s traps, visual effects, and stat effects with your own custom textures and Spellbook art to custom-build your new favorite traps, trinkets, and weapons. Once you’ve put them to the test, upload your custom items to the Workshop to share with thousands of War Mages and give the Order a plethora of new ways to slaughter orcs!

Orcs Must Die! 2 Workshop Features:

Craft New Traps, Trinkets, and Weapons – Using existing Spellbook items, War Mages can construct a dizzying array of new traps to take into battle. Combine existing 3D models with new textures, new stats, new upgrade designs, and new visual effects to craft and share your best orc-maiming ideas.

New Onslaughts – Modify the creatures and timing for waves in existing Orcs Must Die! 2 fortresses and caves to create new and challenging experiences. Did you already beat the game on Nightmare? Now you can create your own ultra-Nightmare Mode to put your skills to the test. Share your custom onslaught levels and campaigns with the community on Workshop.

New Costumes – Replace the textures on any of the sixteen War Mage and Sorceress costumes in Orcs Must Die! 2. Create a huge closet of intimidating new costumes to strike fear into the hearts of orcs!

Get started with the Orcs Must Die! 2 Workshop here.

War Mages will also soon be able to earn Steam Trading Cards for playing Orcs Must Die! 2. Collect trading cards just for playing Orcs Must Die! 2, then craft your cards into special game badges. Crafting game badges earns you cool new Steam items like emoticons, profile backgrounds, coupons and more!

Thankyou Orcs Must Die! 2 for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Robot Entertainment.

Bletchley Park Raises Funds With Synthesised Synthesiser Album

A group of programmers called Music By Programmers, have released an album to raise money to fund maths and programming workshops at The National Museum of Computing, based at Bletchley Park in Oxfordshire.

The group has made the album in members’ free time in the hope that the £5000 it aims to raise will enable the Museum to offer classes and workshops that encourage the next generation of young people to learn programming techniques from the ground up, citing innovating musicians such as Jean Michel Jarre, Tangerine Dream and the forefathers of electronica, Kraftwerk, as influencing not only music, but programming computers in general.

The eight tracks, all written by the group’s members, use sounds initially created by such luminary devices as the MiniMoog, Yamaha CS-80 and Oberheim SEM. These ‘instruments’ now cost thousands of pounds but the software designed to simulate their sounds has been created for just £337.

Jason Gorman, founder of Music By Programmers, said in a press release:

 “It’s very much in the style of ‘classic’ electronica of the 1970s and early 1980s. But we’ve created all our tracks using software recreations of those famous analogue synthesizers that model the circuitry with painstaking accuracy.”

He continued that, despite the synthesiser sounds being a reproduction of the originals, they were practically indistinguishable.

If the fundraising target of £5000 is achieved, it will pay for both parent-child workshops at Bletchley Park, home of the World War II ‘codebreakers’ and their most famous member Alan Turing, plus a new programming club at The National Museum of Computing – in our opinion, a small price to pay for the next generation of technology.

The Music By Programmers album is available to download from 29th April on CD Baby, Amazon, Google Play and iTunes.

For more information, see the Music By Programmers website.