Weigh an Orange with Huawei Force Touch Tech

WAIT! I genuinely have not lost the plot with this article, but Chinese multinational and telecommunications company Huawei might just be walking that tightrope after using its new Mate S Smartphone to see how heavy an orange is at the IFA in Berlin.

The company used its Force Touch Tech within the new phone model to convey the fruits weight on stage at the event. The phone judged the Orange to weigh 280 grams with observers feeling this might not be pinpoint accurate considering an average orange would weigh around 200 grams. What is clearer is that Huawei might have stolen a march on Apple who have introduced Force Touch on the new Apple iWatch and are rumoured to be considering developing the tech for the iPhone.

There are still a few questions to be answered, namely, what would be the heaviest object you would be able to rest on your phone? Imagine the lawsuits if consumers decide to weigh a big bag of sugar and end up splitting their new phone in two. Other new features for the Mate S include the second generation “Knuckle Sense Feature” It reads like Sideshow Bob has designed this, but stick with me; apparently this uses the input from the user’s knuckles for different functions. So how does that work? Glad you asked, no idea, apparently as a quick launch feature the user can assign a letter to an app and then launch said app by drawing the letter with a knuckle at any point.

Pressure sensitive screens are a compelling evolution for mobile devices, Huawei’s features might seem gimmicky, but at least it’s open to debate with the aim of seeing where this tech will lead to. Perhaps Huawei would have made a bigger statement by weighing an Apple instead of an Orange, or a marshmallow, or Lollipop or an Edge of something, or an actual Fox.

Thank you theverge for providing us with this information.

DARPA’s Idea to Replace Batteries with Propane Seems Mad and Genius at the Same Time

Soldiers are becoming more and more reliant on technology and the old-fashioned lithium-ion batteries won’t really do the trick. The US military currently uses the Ultralife UBI-2590 battery pictured below, which weighs in at 1.4kg a piece. However, their capacity is extremely limited and solders need a lot of them to get the job done in the field.

To overcome this issue, DARPA’s Transformative Apps program and their team of engineers from Ultra Electronics have built a lightweight, 350-watt propane generator that is capable of charging its batteries in the field, with the added bonus that it is completely silent.

The idea might not seem such a game changer, but the picture below comparing the old Ultralife UBI-25290 and DARPA’s propane alternative seems to make sense. The screenshots describe that the propane solution is equivalent to 100 Ultralife batteries, which in turn help soldiers reduce the weight load. One Ultralife UBI-2590 battery weighs in at 1.4 kg, while the generator weighs only 5 kg and the tank just 9 kg. There even seem to be smaller 1.8 kg tank alternatives, should the 9 kg propane tank be too much.

Thank you Gizmodo for providing us with this information

iPhone to Protect Itself from Falls by Shifting Weight

According to the International Business Times, Apple has filed a patent that uses the vibration motor inside an iPhone to shift the device’s weight when falling – saving it from serious damage.

“A patent awarded to Apple by the US Patent and Trademark Office this week, describes a “protective mechanism for an electronic device” and calls on the iPhone’s processing power to recognise a fall, calculate the potential impact, and work at lightening speed to come up with a plan to save the fragile glass screen.”

The patent says that the iPhone could rapidly activate the vibration motor to ensure the device always lands on its back. The IBT report says that this would only require a simple spinning motor alongside the standard gyroscope and accelerometer to work.

This seems like quite a realistic proposition – let’s hope we see it in future iPhones.

Source: International Business Times

Wearable Chair Developed by Swiss Startup

Noonee is a Swiss startup who claim to be the forefront of “Chairolution® “Bringing forth a new era of wearable ergonomic leg devices”.

Have you been excited recently for wearable technology such as Google Glass, Smart Watches or even hats that double as tissue dispensers? A wearable chair probably wasn’t the logical progression you were thinking of. But before you grab your pitchforks and start commenting on your social media channels, this invention isn’t necessarily designed for general and public use. Working and standing in a factory on extended shifts takes a large toll on your physical endurance, noonee are trying to provide a viable solution.

Their ‘chairless chair’ is a locking leg support device. Once you strap yourself in, you can press a button and take the weight off yourself without effort. Made out of aluminium and carbon fiber, the frame is designed to hold whichever position you are currently assuming – meaning you don’t have to compromise with standard set positions.

Engaget helped explain the science behind the device:

“The secret sauce here is a battery-powered dampening system eases the load on your lower back and legs by supporting your body weight and directing it down into your heels.”

Audi and BMW are said to soon be taking on this prototype unit for on-field testing, let’s see if it can stand up to the test.

Are you often attending expos, trade shows or events? Maybe we’ll see these as a public reality – unfortunately, we haven’t had any price indication as of yet.

Image courtesy of noonee