Surf’s Up At a Giant Artificial Wave Park In Wales

Well this is something, ever wanted to Surf within a park which produces enormous artificial waves? you’re in luck as a new adventure attraction has opened within the Conwy Valley in North Wales. Surf Snowdonia is a one-of-a-kind in-land surf facility that claims to produce the “longest man-made surfable waves on the planet.”

It has been a good 10 years in the making and holds the title of being the first Wavegarden surfing lagoon to be opened to the public. The facility has arrived with an estimated £12 million price tag and measures 300 x 120 m (984 x 394 ft) to put this into perspective; it’s roughly the same size of six full length football pitches.

So how does this gigantic park operate? In order to create the waves, the owners have implemented a snow plow-like machine, or “wavefoil,” which moves back and forth along an underwater track which is running the length of the lagoon. As the wavefoil moves, it generates a barrelling wave on each side of the central divider. The speed and size of waves which are able to be produced are controlled by a computer and can reach heights of 0.7 m (28 in), 1.2 m (47 in) and 2 m (79 in)

It certainly looks impressive if you’re into this form of sporting activity, the tech behind such a feat has allowed the park to offer visitors a unique experience which is different to many other theme parks. Surf Snowdonia is also built on the site of a former aluminium factory, its construction saw the removal over 100 years-worth of heavy industrial waste.

If you would like to see it in action, then by all means watch the adrenalin fuelled video below.

Thank You surfsnowdonia and Gizmag for providing us with this information.

Mind-Reading Cap Helps Patients Control Their Prosthetic Limbs with Their Thoughts

While the ability of controlling prosthetics with your mind has been around for some time now, it required controlled electronics to be implanted directly in the patient in order to get them to work properly.

The University of Houston however found a way to use a non-intrusive approach to solve this problem by using an EEG that monitors brain activity externally through the scalp. Then, a brain-machine interface, or BMI for short, interprets the brain waves and converts the patient’s intentions into mechanical motion.

For example, if a patient thinks of picking up an object, the BMI will give the same command to the prosthetic and makes it pick up the object in question. The University of Houston has even had an 80% success rate with this project up until now. The findings are said to have been published on the Frontiers in Neuroscience, having the team of researchers be the first to get a multi-fingered prosthetic work this well with an EEG/BMI interface.

The team of researchers hope that their findings will avoid the trap of having controllers surgically implanted in patients, where the body may either reject or even form infections due to the implants. Also, the information gathered from the project at hand could even give us a higher understanding of how our brain communicates with our own limbs.

Thank you Endgadget for providing us with this information