Turris VR Seating and Movement Control and DIY PC Kickstarter Kicks Off

The Praevidi team just launched its first Kickstarter, a VR seating and movement controller that houses a Mini-ITX . The design allows the user to input movement controls with their body while keeping their hands free. The seat also has infinite rotation and with the PC in the seat that means that you won’t be tangling yourself in wires.

The Turris Kickstarter has Turris kits for as low as $475 with an estimated January 2016 delivery date. The video on the Kickstarter page does a great job explaining the concept behind the Turris.

The guys behind the Turris are industry vets and have done design and consulting work for plenty of VR companies like Seebright, Virtuix, AboutFace, and Sixense. The design is really a great concept for keeping untangled in the current wired VR gear, and having another movement input is icing on the cake. The seat has been made to be tuneable for individuals since we are not all the same.

Having known both Simon and Aaron for a few years I took some time to ask them about the Turris.

Simon said “Aaron has been working on seating for 20 years and we began collaborating first on extreme overclocking and then on virtual reality. Together we conceived of the Turris as a systems approach to the ergonomic and motion control challenges of VR. This is a complex piece of hardware that solves many problems at once. And it’s the best excuse to build a VR rig.”

I also spoke with Aaron about the Turris and asked what the biggest engineering challenge was. He said it was finding where the pivots would be for the proper motion of the seat, and that process lead to a tunable design. He also said that one of the biggest challenges going forward is cost reduction to help them bring down the cost of units, making them more affordable to consumers.

The Turris will be American made and will use parts from the US, with a small amount of electronics coming from overseas.

Students Create Physical Feedback Glove for Virtual Reality

There is no doubt that in the past few years the virtual reality market has grown exponentially, with kits such as the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive looking to be released in the very near future, the new future of gaming is now nearly upon us. But one thing that was always lacking from the VR dream was physical feedback, being able to see what you were touching but not actually feeling it. Well now a team of students from Rice University have created the Hands Omni, a glove that provides physical feedback to actions committed in a virtual environment and it looking very promising, even in its very bare-bones state.

The glove, which had its development sponsored by Virtuix, a works by inflating and deflating small airbags under the fingers, providing the pressure you’d normally encounter in the real world at some level. The glove also recently won the “People’s Choice” award at Rice’s own Engineering Design Showcase.

Designed to be as unnoticeable to the user as possible, the glove uses a wireless system to give you all the freedom of movement you need, which is quite an issue with current VR systems such as the Oculus, as you are limited in the confines of the cable. The glove also only weighs an impressive 350 grams meaning that you will hardly even notice it, which is pretty handy for not breaking the illusion of virtual reality.

If such a product will soon become readily available for mass production, then we could see virtual reality get a whole lot more physical.

Thank you to phys.org for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Oculus.

Virtuix Omni VR Treadmill To Ship This July

It’s been a long time coming, but I remember seeing the first few prototype videos of this, and I even happen to know a guy who owns one of these crazy VR treadmills, way before anyone else will get one. Us mere mortals however will have to wait just a while longer, as the Virtuix Omni VR Treadmill will begin shipping to Kickstarter backers this July, those who are quick and get theirs pre-ordered could see their stock arrive as early as September.

Demonstrations and trials of the Virtuix have proved very successful, allowing you to walk, run, jump and squat your way through your virtual environment. If you want to strap on the Oculus Rift or a similar VR device, you can then put on the special shoes that allow you to walk on the Omni treadmill, then go for a jog from Whiterun to Riften; keeping fit will never be the same again.

At just $499 for the Omni, special shoes, harness, software and some bundled software, the Omni is pretty good value for money, just try and find a good quality treadmill and you’ll see what I mean.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/l9gJPRTqHCg[/youtube]

Thank you HotHardware for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of HotHardware.