Research Finds In-Game Usernames Correlated With Anti-Social Behaviour

According to the latest research, it turns out the names we pick in game are a good predictor of how we behave in-game. By looking at the usernames of player in League of Legends, researchers were able to correlate anti-social tendencies in game with both age and the choice of username.

Rating names based on Anti-Social Naming Tendency (ANT) and Age as derived from the username, researchers correlated this data with Riot’s in-game reporting system. Not surprisingly, players with anti-social usernames tended to have more reports and complaints. It also found that younger players tended to have a much higher amount of reports sent and received, well in excess compared tot he amounts for older players.

Players with more neutral usernames tended to receive less reports and were more willing to give out “honor” or a positive report of other players. The same held true for older players who sent out honor 6% more often and received it 2% more frequently.

While we might think of older gamers are those in their late 20 and 30s and even beyond, it turns out that going up to 22-25 years of age was enough to see positive impacts. The researchers chalk up the age differences as due to cognitive development of the young male demographic. The anti-social naming is more self-explanatory, with real world personality being the driver. Interestingly enough, those with anti-social names tended to do very slightly better on average. With more research, it will be interesting to see the interaction between our real world and in-game personalities.

Bit Defender Admits To Being Hacked

Oh the irony never fails to amuse, an Anti Virus company who boast on keeping customers safe from online threats, have themselves falling victim to a hack. Kaspersky discovered a bot within their system and now so has Bit Defender, who have admitted to being hacked.

Bit Defenders security policy will be under heavy criticism after the hacker going by the name of DetoxRansome, claims to have access to the Bit Defender customer information which allegedly includes passwords. The hacker also claims this information has been stored in an unencrypted format by the antivirus giant.

Bit Defender have responded and stated that a “potential security issue with a server and determined a single application was targeted within a component of its public cloud offering”  The company have also responded to the amount of data which might have been leaked by stating that, “exposure of a few user accounts and passwords is very limited and it represents less than one percent of our SMB customers”

There are reports that the hacker has demanded Bit Defender pay a ransom of $15,000, or see all the information dumped online. As noted by news sources, the hacker looks as if they have dumped around 250 customers usernames and passwords onto the web. Among the names were extensions belonging to .gov, which indicates government customers might have been affected.

The Hackers version is the following “We had taken control of two BitDefender cloud servers and got all logins. Yes, they were unencrypted, I can prove it… they were using Amazon Elastic Web cloud which is notorious for SSL [a form of web encryption] problems.”

The level of severity depends on which version you believe, either Bit Defender have only comprised a reported 1% of data or the whole lot. One thing looks apparent, for the love of god, why oh why did they not encrypt sensitive information, if a company offers cloud storage then this has to be secure, or as near as.

In a corporate world as consumers you receive corporate promises, looks excellent on the outside, dig deeper and your logins might be on the open web. Only time will tell to the extent with which Bit Defender have been compromised, let’s hope this is an alarm call to change practises when storing sensitive information online, or not as the case all too often is.

Original Bit Defender logo courtesy of dev0blog

Thank You Forbes for providing us with this information

Dropbox Wasn’t Hacked but Leaked Credentials Are Real

There hasn’t been any shortage on high-profile hacks lately. First there was the celebrity iCloud situation and just last week the we were hit with the Snapchat photo hack. This time it’s Dropbox that is being targeted. An anonymous user posting on pastebin claims to have over 7 million Dropbox usernames and passwords. He posted the first 400 credentials with the announcement and said he would release more upon receiving Bitcoin donations.

Dropbox has issued a public statement on their blog about the issue, stating that the credentials are in fact were real, but that their security wasn’t breached and they weren’t hacked either. This is rather a compilation of usernames and passwords from other services that were compromised. The users simply had used the same combination for their Dropbox account as well as many other services.

Recent news articles claiming that Dropbox was hacked aren’t true. Your stuff is safe. The usernames and passwords referenced in these articles were stolen from unrelated services, not Dropbox. Attackers then used these stolen credentials to try to log in to sites across the internet, including Dropbox. We have measures in place to detect suspicious login activity and we automatically reset passwords when it happens.

There have been a couple more posts on pastebin since the original post with supposedly more credentials. These however seem to be fake and posted by pranksters instead. Dropbox added in their statements that the majority of the leaked credentials had been discovered prior and the passwords have already been reset.

It didn’t take long after the news was out before I had the first messages in my inbox about it. People asking if it was true, what to do and how to check if they were affected. The usual good advice goes here as so many other places. Don’t use the same password for multiple services, change it regularly from a secure device, enable two-way authentication and keep your security software updated.

Thank you Dropbox for providing us with these information

Image courtesy of Dropbox