The Pope’s iPad Sold for $30,500 at an Uruguay Charity Auction

It looks like technology brought some support for the poor over in Uruguay earlier this week. The Castells auction house reportedly hosted a charitable auction, having Pope Francis’ old iPad up for the taking. There are a lot of antique fanatics out there, and such an item was bound to attract some attention.

Reports state that a buyer, whose identity is not known, bid a large sum for the old iPad, having the device scoop up a sum of $30,500. The iPad is said to have inscribed “His Holiness Francisco. Servizio Internet Vatican, March 2013” on the back and comes with the Vatican’s signed certificate and a black Logitech keyboard.

Auctions such as this are perceived by a lot of people to be gatherings where rich people go and bid large sums of money, while sipping expensive champagne and eat caviar, in order to fill up their ego and other people’s pockets. This time around, all the money raised went to a local school for the poor.

This act proves yet again that Pope Francis’ is extremely open to technology and believes it is a “way to foster dialogue across different faiths”. Whether or not you believe the same thing, just think of this: what do you use to check in at your favourite coffee shop or friends on the other side of the world?

Thank you The Verge for providing us with this information
Images courtesy of The Verge

21 Countries And Rising Have Joined Anti-NSA UN Resolution Discussions

RT reports that 21 countries have joined in draft discussions at the UN for an anti-NSA resolution to be passed. In the discussions are the following nations: Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Brazil, Cuba, Ecuador, France, Germany, Guyana, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Liechtenstein, Mexico, Norway, Paraguay, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Uruguay and Venezuela. The resolution seeks to condemn indiscriminate and extra-territorial surveillance and rectify that with independent oversight of all electronic monitoring.

The resolution was proposed earlier this week by Germany and Brazil, two of the largest and most vocal critics of the USA’s global spying operations. While the document does not single out the USA or NSA specifically, the rhetoric is clearly a direct attack on the NSA’s exposed global surveillance practices.

The draft resolutions states that UN members are “deeply concerned at human rights violations and abuses that may result from the conduct of extra-territorial surveillance or interception of communications in foreign jurisdictions.” and that “illegal surveillance of private communications and the indiscriminate interception of personal data of citizens constitutes a highly intrusive act that violates the rights to freedom of expression and privacy and threatens the foundations of a democratic society.”

Image courtesy of Joshua Lott / Getty Images / AFP

Latin American Nations Withdraw Ambassadors From Europe After Jet Incident

Russia Today reports that the backlash against Europe after the Bolivian Jet incident is now growing in Latin America. After having a serious emergency meeting already four countries have now decided to withdraw their ambassadors from European nations involved in the incident.

Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay will all withdraw their ambassadors from France, Spain, Portugal and Italy in retaliation against their decision to block airspace for Bolivian president Evo Morales and his state jet – pictured above.

Nicolas Maduro, president of Venezuela, stated that:

“We’ve taken a number of actions in order to compel public explanations and apologies from the European nations that assaulted our brother Evo Morales”

Both the UNASUR (Union of South American Nations) and trade-bloc Mercosur (Mercado Común del Sur) have condemned the actions of Europe as imperialist and neo-colonialist. This entire diplomatic spat has emerged from the belief that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden was onboard the Bolivian State Jet. Since then the situation has escalated with the majority of Latin America condemning Western Europe and the USA, and many Latin American nations offering Edward Snowden asylum in protest.

Image courtesy of AFP Photo/Patrick Domingo