Basic Solid State Drive Features Explained

When we report on storage news as well as in our reviews, we use a lot of terms and features that might not be familiar to everyone. The words and acronyms sound good and you chose your products based on whether they are present or not. But what do they actually mean? That is something that I’ll try to explain a little more today. I think there is a little bit for everyone here, whether you’re an advanced system builder or new to the area.

First I’ll start out with the basic features that are present in almost any storage drive these days, whether it’s a flash drive, hard disk drive, or solid state drive, and then slowly move on to the more exclusive features further down.


S.M.A.R.T.

S.M.A.R.T. is the most basic feature that you’ll find and at the same time it is one of the most useful ones. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology and it is a way for the drive to keep track of itself and let you have access to the information too. There are many tools out there that can read out the information for you and most systems can also keep track of them trough BIOS and chipset functions. A simple and free tool to get access to the information is CrystalDiskInfo.

Most SMART values are can be two values, either good or bad, but there are a few that keep track of total reads, writes, and power-on hours as well. An application like CrystalDiskInfo will also show you the expected health status as you can see in the image above.

S.M.A.R.T. can also include self-tests that can be run manually or scheduled by a lot of systems. The short and long tests will check electrical and mechanical performance and are basically identical. The short will only test small parts of the area where the long test will test the entire surface of the disk with no time limit.


TRIM

TRIM, also know as a Trim command, is a way for the operating system to inform a solid state drive which blocks of data are no longer considered in use and can be wiped. Internally, SSD operations are quite a bit different from HDD operations and TRIM was created because of that. The typical way in which operating systems handle deletes and formats would result in progressive performance degradation of write operations on SSDs.

With TRIM, the SSD is able to handle the garbage collection itself and free up the cells for new writes. We all know that a deleted file in the operating system doesn’t mean a deleted file on the drive, not until the physical location of the file has been overwritten. A mechanical drive handles a write and an overwrite action the same way, but an SSD doesn’t. It would first need to erase the area before it can write there again. It also means that a deleted file is gone ones the Trim command has processed the area.

There are manual tools to trigger the Trim command, but they’re aren’t needed if you got a modern operating system. There are independent tools for it and pretty much any SSD toolbox and software also has a button to send the command to the drive. This is a thing that we can expect to see removed from such software in the future as it’s fully automatic now.


Garbage Collection

Garbage collection is basically the same function, except that the garbage collection is performed on a drive level where TRIM is an operating system function. In return, it means that it also works on systems that don’t support TRIM and helps to keep the performance up.

I could go a lot into detail about how it works, but then we’re missing the point of easy information in this article. Without TRIM or garbage collection, the SSD doesn’t know what files have been marked as deleted and aren’t no longer needed. Those deleted data might still be moved around on the drive itself when it is optimizing and that will result in a lot of extra writes. There are many ways this is implemented in drives and it comes down to the drive itself, the controller, and manufacturer how exactly it works.


Wear Leveling

There are two types of wear leveling, dynamic and static. Static is also sometimes referred to as global wear leveling and it is this type that we usually find in solid state drives. Dynamic wear leveling, on the other hand, is mostly found on flash drives. Both types will attempt to use all physical flash equally so one chip doesn’t burn out before the rest and render the drive useless. Where the static will do this on the entire drive, the dynamic will only do this with memory blocks that get replacement data. The static wear leveling is a little slower but gives the drive a longer life expectancy. It doesn’t just help to prolong the life of the drives, it also helps with a more even performance.


DevSleep

DevSleep, DevSlp, or Device Sleep are all words for the same thing and it is the newest and most effective way for drives to enter a low-power sleep mode. In traditional low-power modes, the SATA link still needed to remain powered on to allow the device to receive a wake-up signal again. With DevSlp, the rarely used 3.3 V power connection is used instead to send the signal, allowing the drive to enter an even deeper sleep state by turning off more functions. The return is an even faster response time when it wakes up again and less power consumption. This is particularly useful for notebook users.


PFM+, IPS, and more

These are all synonyms for basically the same function, so I’ll stick with one that is present in one of the drives that we’ve recently reviewed: Power failure management plus (PFM+) that is present in OCZ’s Vector 180 series. With different names, they all perform the same function: get as much data safely to the storage drive in case of a power failure. There are extra capacitors in the drive that store currency in order to flush more data to the flash cells before all the power is gone. The capacitors also ensure that all metadata is safe and that the drive will continue to operate normally after a power loss, i.e. the NAND mapping table won’t be lost, which can brick the drive or at least slow down the next boot up as the drive has to go through a recovery process. This used to be a feature reserved to enterprise class drives, but we see it enter more and more enthusiast drives too.


ECC

ECC or Error Correction Code is present in a lot of devices and it is no different for solid state drives. It is an extra code that allows the drive to correct minor errors in sector reads and to recover data from sectors that have gone bad while storing that data in the spare sectors. It is basically what it says it is. It corrects errors.

Low-density parity-check (LDPC) is the go-to standard today for multiple reasons that I won’t go to much into here. In the past, it was rather BCH that was used, but that isn’t an effective method for modern SSDs. To say it short, LPDC allows you to correct more errors for the same ratio of user data to ECC parity. With ECC, fewer actions have to be repeated in case something goes wrong which in return gives a better overall performance.

Toshiba HG6 THNSNJ512GCSU 512GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


Toshiba’s drives are mostly sold as OEM models and built into other products such as workstations and laptops, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t deserve to get a good spin on my test bench. Today I’m taking a closer look at the Toshiba HG6 series of solid state drives, more specific the Non-SED model with 512GB capacity (THNSNJ512GCSU).

The HG6 is a series of mainstream SATA Solid State Drives that combine high performance with power efficiency to satisfy a wide range of applications from notebook PCs to servers in the data centers. Toshiba is the inventor of NAND flash memory technology, so we know that we have some of the best on our hands when dealing with these drives.

Toshiba leverages its NAND flash memory expertise to optimize the performance and data integrity, integrating enterprise-class technology such as the Toshiba Quadruple Swing-By Code (QSBC) for improved error correction and reliability. It is the 2.5-inch drive that I’m taking a look at today, but the drive is available in a wide variety of form factors such as mSATA and M.2 2280 and with capacities between 60GB and up to 512GB.

Toshiba’s Quadruple Swing-By Code (QSBC) technology is in improved error correction code (ECC) that is said to be far superior to the otherwise used technologies and as such should provide you with far better data security. It also features End-to-End Data Protection, S.M.A.R.T., TRIM and Garbage collection. The drives support Read-only mode for emergency and serial ATA DIPM (Device Initiated Power Management), HIPM (Host Initiated Power Management) and Device Sleep for reduced power consumption.

The reduced power consumption from the above-mentioned features is great for use in laptops and so it the drives weight of just 53 grams. The HG6 is using Toshiba’s own A19nm Toggle 2.0 MLC NAND Flash memory as well as the in-house created Toshiba T635879BXBG SSD controller. It comes with a normal mean time to failure for this market segment of 1.5 million hours and an expected product life of 5 years. Since this is an OEM product, the warranty is based on whatever product you’ve purchased with it built-in.

The drive doesn’t use a RAM buffer like most SSDs on the market, but rather relies on the Adaptive Size SLC Write Cache technology that assumes a similar function as Samsung’s TurboWrite feature. It is treating a portion of the NAND as SLC for write operations to improve performance before flushing the writes to the MLC when idle. It’s also to be noted that Toshiba used thermal pads on all chips, providing the most efficient heat dissipation for high-performance systems such as servers.

Silicon Power Slim S80 240GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


Silicon Power has been in the storage business for a long time and I’m glad to finally be able to put one of their drives on the bench and take it for a test run. Today I’m taking a closer look at the SP Slim S80 solid state drive that comes with promises impressive performance and is available with capacities up to 960GB. It is however, the 240GB model that I’m taking a look at today.

The Slim S80 is equipped with a Phison PS3108-S8 SATA-to-Flash micro-controller to deliver sequential transfer rates up to 550MB/s reads 500MB/s writes while offering impressive 4K random speeds of up to 80,000 IOPS. With such a performances, the Slim S80 can significantly reduce both boot times and quickly load applications as well as provide a higher reliability than traditional hard disk drives and provide higher reliability over traditional hard drive.

Silicon Power’s Slim S80 is carrying its name thanks to the 7mm height for use in ultrabooks, ultra slim notebooks, and similar narrow spaced usage areas; on top of that it only weighs 63 grams. Solid state drives are perfect to use in mobile devices thanks to the lack of mechanical parts so they aren’t affected by shocks and vibrations in the same way.

Built with both S.M.A.R.T., Wear Leveling techniques, and Error Correction Code, the Slim S80 should guarantee data safety on top of the great performance and a long lifespan. The used Phison controller also supports AES encryption to keep your data safe and DevSleep for a low power consumption in mobile devices.

Specifications

  • Capacity: 32GB/60GB/120GB/240GB/480GB/960GB
  • Dimensions: 100mm x 69.85mm x 7mm
  • Weight: 79g
  • Vibration Resistance Test: 20G
  • Shock Resistance Test: 1500G Max
  • Read up to 550MB/s、Write up to 500MB/s
  • 7mm slim design suitable for Ultrabooks and Ultra-slim notebooks
  • SATA III 6Gbps backward compatible with SATA II 3Gbps
  • Supports TRIM command and Garbage Collection technology
  • NCQ and RAID ready
  • Implemented with ECC technology to guarantee data transmission reliability
  • Built-in with SMART monitoring system
  • 3-year warranty

Besides the Phison controller, the S80 has 16 of Toshiba’s 19nm flash chips and a 256MB Nanya RAM chip.

ASUSTOR Announces the Launch of ADM 2.4

After almost 2 months in beta state, ASUSTOR officially released the new ADM 2.4 update. After updating their NAS with the new operating system, users will be able to enjoy improved performance on encrypted shares as well as a proper release of storage space previously occupied by already deleted files. The use of SSDs has also been optimized with full TRIM support to keep up the transfer speeds of the drives. The SNMP network management protocol was added and the Network Defender got enhanced with more flexibility. With the use of VLC, the NAS devices now also support multimedia browsing for the File Explorer with generated thumbnails of your videos.

The new update that also includes bugfixes is available for all ASUSTOR’s devices now, all you need to do is update your NAS. If you aren’t sure if you want to upgrade your system, you can take a test drive of the new system with the Live Demo on the ADM site.

New functions featured in ADM 2.4 include:

  • All new shared folder encryption mechanism: The new encryption mechanism, effectively increases data encryption speeds, and properly releases storage space previously occupied by already deleted files. With regards to encrypted folders that were created using the previous encryption method, a conversion function is provided on the settings page for easy converting without any complicated steps.
  • Newly added support for the SSD Trim command: This function allows the SSDs installed on the NAS to maintain stable read/write performance while simultaneously controlling the frequency of overwriting to specific blocks, extending the life of SSDs.
  • Newly added SNMP Network Management Protocol: Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) provides a set of standards that allows managers on a single network management system (NMS) to collect information from all network equipment for convenient monitoring and maintenance. ADM 2.4.0 supports SNMP v1, v2c, v3 and also provides a trap setting that can actively notify the NMS of significant events.
  • Enhanced Network Defender: Users can now create a trusted list and also define black and white lists using the IP country of origin or area via the Geo IP expansion module, providing added configuration flexibility.
  • Optimized File Explorer: Users can now intuitively right-click and select the preview function to play videos, music and images when browsing through multimedia files with ADM File Explorer.

Thanks to ASUSTOR for providing us with this information

Angelbird SSDwrk Now Available as 1TB Version

Angelbird has announced that their great looking SSD wrk and SSD wrk for Mac drives now are available as 1TB versions (SSDWRKM1TB). A couple of months ago when we tested the SSD wrk, we saw that there was plenty of physical room inside the robust aluminium chassis. Taking that and coupling it with the advanced in NAND flash technology and we get this 1TB beauty.

“We are happy to announce the extension of the successful SSD wrk-series with the two new 1 terabyte versions. This series now covers the entire consumer SSD spectrum, offering perfectly adapted models for every requirement,” said Roman Rabitsch, CEO of Angelbird.

The Angelbird SSD wrk is built with the SATA 3.1 interface and has the SMI2246EN controller and custom packed MLC NAND inside. It can reach maximum read and write speeds of  564 and 456 MB/s and the new 1TB version can reach 72K IOPS. The drive features over-voltage, overload, EMS and ESD protections. Mac users might love this drive even more, as it is one of the very few third party drives to support TRIM out of the box without need for drivers or tools, including OS X Yosemite.

The SSDwrk comes with a five-year warranty and an MSRP of €483.25 in Europe and $599.00 in the States, excluding VAT. As a bonus, you can take a tour behind the scenes at Angelbird’s facilities in Austria and get a glimpse into SSD manufacturing.

Thanks to Angelbird for providing us with this Information

Images and video courtesy of Angelbird

OS X Yosemite Kills Third-Party SSD Support

The new OS X 10.10 Yosemite was received pretty well upon release, sure it had a few minor hiccups, but overall it was an improvement. But not everything is visible right away, especially not when it’s done in secret.

Apple has silently and without any warning killed support for third-party SSDs in this new OS X version, leaving anyone who uses such as a boot drive and has TRIM enabled with a Mac that won’t start. The cause for this is the new Kext Signing security-feature that checks if the system has been altered and has parts approved by Apple. In itself, this is a great feature and one that won’t effect the average Apple user, but professionals with customized high-end Mac’s might be left with a lot of trouble.

“Kext signing basically works by checking if all the drivers in the system are unaltered by a third party, or approved by Apple. If they have been modified, Yosemite will no longer load the driver. This is a means of enforcing security, but also a way for Apple to control what hardware that third-party developers can release OS X support for.”

The good news is that you can disable the Kext signing and the Trim Enabler tool has been updated to do just that. It however has the downside that none of your drives are protected by this feature as it’s a global setting and not per drive. The blog post about this issue by Cindori Software, the makers of Trim Enabler, also has a guide on how to get back into your system if the Yosemite update should have locked you out due to a 3rd party boot drive.

Thanks to Cindori for providing us with this information

Angelbird SSD2go Pocket USB 3.0 External Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


I recently had the pleasure to review the Angelbirds SSD wrk internal drive that did very well, so I was pretty excited when I got told about the new SSD2go Pocket. An external, On-The-Go Solid State Drive with the same power as an internal one while maintaining a tiny form factor and of course portability. With the native UASP support and connecting through the USB3 interface, it allows this drive to take full advantage of the 5GB/s bandwidth and should see it take off like a rocket in comparison to other external flash-based drives. The SSD2go pocket is available in three sizes; 128 GB, 256 GB and 512 GB, and comes bundled with software and music that further increases the overall value.

The SSD2go pocket is the first and only external USB drive to support both TRIM and SMART for Mac right out of the box. This is an important factor considering how popular the Angelbird drives are among musicians and other artists who have their preferred work area on Macs.

This drive doesn’t just promise us great performance and features, it is a little piece of art at the same time. The slightly curved design in combination with the magnificent finish on the coating turns this external drive into a stylish accessory rather than just a tech-gizmo. The rounded corners and shape in combination with the tiny pocket size of just 89×69.9×10.4mm allow this drive to slide right into your pocket, even when you’re wearing tight jeans.

It’s really hard to describe the feeling you’ll have when you unpack the SSD2go pocket and hold it in your hands for the first time. It has an almost magical attraction, you can’t stop looking at it, inspecting every millimetre to see if you can find the tiniest error in the finish. But you won’t, it is like it was made with magic. Those who have had the luck to hold one the SSD2go models in their own hands will know what I’m talking about.

The external finish isn’t just beautiful to feel and look at, the SSD2go Pocket is also an incredible durable drive. It is enclosed in a CNC machined aluminium housing that has been glass pearl blasted and hard anodized. Angelbird also used the far more robust type A USB connector on the drive instead of the more common used Type B-micro connector and retracted it further into the drive to protect it. The overall result is an almost indestructible drive.

While words may be just that to you, it’s worth checking out the video below. An uncut extreme-test of the SSD2go Pocket performed outside the Angelbird headquarters by Roman Rabitsch, the CEO of Angelbird. I would still like to challenge Angelbird to the tank test we’ve seen on performed on the G710+ keyboard.

When we couple all of the above with the great quality control Angelbird is running, we know we don’t have much to worry about. Each component is carefully inspected and pre-tested before assembly to ensure the production fulfils the highest standards. They’re also ISO certified to fulfil the fine production standards of medical technology. The drives pass through further quality controls such as automated optical inspection, in-circuit tests, bin-in inside a climate chamber, and of course a function test. The function tests will be repeated before the products are sent out to the customer to make sure that each and every device works.

Performance wise this 512 GB model promises us some impressive write speeds up to 390 MB/s and read speeds up to 450 MB/s. The IOPS are rated to 38.800 which is really good for an external drive and it has an access time of 0.9 ms. The power draw is only 0.8 watts in idle and 3.41 maximum, so this drive won’t suck your laptops battery dry nor need any external power supply. Backed by a 5-year limited warranty, the SSD2go Pocket has a mean time before failure (MTBF) rating of over 2 million hours and the total bytes written (TBF) are rated to 1048TB of data.

A further bonus is added to this drive by the pre-loaded content. You’ll get a full version of Parallels 10 (Mac) and Bitwig Studio 1.0 (Win, Mac, Linux) as well as the System Reflection Backup tool. It also includes PureMix Audio Production video tutorials as well as music provided by the artist themselves free for remixing. Artists featured at the time of release are Marshall Jefferson, CeCe Rogers and Trash, but the library will be expanded with new artists and content.

If you’d like to have a truly personal drive, you can add a personal touch to your Angelbird SSD2go pocket with a customized engraving. Of course, you will need to order the drive at Angelbirds’ own webshop for this as the retailers can’t predict your future engraving wishes.

Angelbird Introduces SSD wrk for Mac

Angelbird is a highly popular brand among artists and creators of all kings of art. It is also still a fact that many of those artists use Mac systems for their ease-of-use and the functionality they provide for music and image creations. So it’s no surprise that Angelbird is working hard on products to give those people the best experience they can get. As such they’ve just released the new SSD wrk for Mac. This is the first and only third-party drive that offers TRIM support for Mac out of the box, without the need of extra tools and utilities.

The SSD wrk for Mac is built upon the same quality components as the regular model that did very well in our review. It’s packed with custom NAND from Micron and powered by the SMI 2246EN controller. It connects via the SATA 3.1 interface and is fully backwards compatible to older Mac models. It can perform 72K IOPS and achieve speeds of up to 563 MB/s when reading and 450 MB/s when writing. The average access times are below 0.1 milliseconds.

The quality work is backed by a 5-year warranty and the drive has a MTBF of at least 2 million hours. Please note how Angelbird use the words “at least” instead of the term “up to” that we usually see here. Angelbird knows that they’ve built a quality product here. The durability is further improved by the integrated EDC and ECC error correction capabilities. Besides being a fast drive it’s also a power saving drive. The 128GB model only requires 0.25 watts in idle mode and 1.97 watts under load. The largest 512 GB model uses a maximum of 2.98 watts under full load, a perfect drive for a Mac Book. On top of the drive, customers also get access to the Personal Support Portal where they can register their product and view warranty periods as well as download free and full versions of software. A place worth checking out for any one who owns an Angelbird product.

The SSD wrk for Mac can be purchased in capacities of 128 GB (99.99 USD / 59,99 GBP), 256 GB (159.99 USD / 99,99 GBP) and 512 GB (299.99 USD / 191,99 GBP). All prices ex. VAT.

Thank you Angelbird for providing us with these information

Images courtesy of Angelbird

NASA’s Mars Rover to Be Reset and Wiped

NASA is preparing to reset and wipe the flash memory in their Mars rover Opportunity. Opportunity is the older of the two rovers cruising around on Mars’ surface and has done so since 2004. With it’s general age and the harsh environment it operates in, but also the older technology in use, it is starting to show more and more problems. NASA’s engineers had to reset the rover with increasing frequency and during August they had to do it over a dozen of times alone.

Now they’ve had enough, and the flash has to be wiped. The rover uses the same type of flash as we do here on earth. But 10 years ago the automatic garbage collection functions, like TRIM, weren’t well developed yet and a lot of the flash has burned out. NASA’s engineers expect this to be the root of the trouble they’re having.

NASA will make a backup of everything stored on the flash, remotely to earth, and then wipe it clean. Then all the worn out cells in the flash memory will be marked as defective so they don’t get used any more. When that is done, all the data back will be flashed back to the rover before it gets another reset and reboot. While this sounds like a pretty serious memory surgery to some, all the rovers critical software is stored outside of the flash and won’t be affected. And looking at the technical point of it, a pretty ordinary task.

Still, I can’t help to think of the increased pulse and heart rate I get every time I have to re-flash an expensive piece of hardware, so I can only imagine that some of the NASA engineers are exited and nervous about the impending wipe. It’s still a pretty normal task for system admins, if you take away the part where they are located about 125 million miles away from the rover.

Opportunity has already set the record for most distance driven off-earth, and it looks like NASA hasn’t given up on it yet. There is still a lot of clay and shadows to be discovered on Mars.

Thank you cnet for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of cnet.

Transcend Announces its Latest M.2 Solid State Disk Series

Transcend has just announced its latest M.2 Solid State Disk lineup featuring a next generation SATA III 6 GB/s MTS, up to 512 GB and ultra compact dimensions.

The company states that the latest M.2 SSD lineup comes in three M.2 form factors, namely Type 2242 for the MTS400, Type 2260 for the MTS 600 and Type 2280 for the MTS800 respectively. While all three variations have the same width and thickness, the height can be deduced from the SSD’s type. Therefore, the MTS400, MTS600 and MTS800 measure in at 42/60/80 mm x 22 mm x 3.5 mm.

In terms of specifications, the MTS400 offers up to 256 GB, while the MTS600 and MTS800 offer up to 512 GB respectively. The storage solutions feature a powerful Transcend TS6500 controller, a DDR3 DRAM cache, as well as read speeds of up to 560 MB/s and write speeds of up to 310 MB/s.

Transcend has also stated that the M.2 SSD lineup comes with full support for the SATA Device Sleep Mode, or DevSleep, in addition to Intel’s Smart Response Technology (ISRT). Having both technologies present, Transcend is looking to provide a battery saving and fast booting hard disk solution. This is achievable by completely powering off the SATA interface when it is no longer required, while also having an outstanding response time of 20 ms, offering instant-on capabilities.

Other features present in the M.2 SSD lineup consist of TRIM and NCQ support, built-in EEC, wear levelling and intelligent block management, as well as enhanced S.M.A.R.T. commands, power shield mechanism and excellent shock resistance.

The company is said to offer a three-year warranty for all M.2 SSDs, while the price range varies depending on capacity. Therefore, the 32 GB version is said to have been priced at $39, the 64 GB version at $59, the 128 GB at $99 and the 256 GB at $169. As stated previously, the MTS600/800 also comes in the 512 GB version, which the company associated a price of $319.

ASUS ROG “RAIDR Express” PCIe SSD Officially Launched

We’ve seen the ASUS RAIDR Express SSD as long ago as CES 2013 but it is now finally ready for a consumer release. ASUS’ RAIDR Express has taken so long to get to market because ASUS have had to work really hard on trying to develop a PCIe SSD that is compatible with the widest variety of motherboards. The ASUS RAIDR Express comes with “DuoMode” which allows it to work with both a legacy BIOS and a modern UEFI BIOS. The DuoMode is changed by a hardware level switch.

The RAIDR Express has a 240GB capacity with sequential reads of 830 MB/s and writes of 810 MB/s. IOPS are up to 100K for 4K read/write performance. The flash used is 19nm Toshiba MLC sync-NAND chips. Additionally ASUS have also bundled a RAMDisk utility with the RAIDR Express to allow up to 12,000 MB/s and reduce the number of write cycles on the RAIDR Express SSD thus extending its life span.

ASUS have developed ROG HybriDisk technology which allows the RAIDR Express to be an SSD Cache for a traditional hard drive up to 4TB in capacity. The ASUS RAIDR Express has TRIM support and a MTBF of 620,000 hours.

Specification

  • PCI Express 2.0 x2
  • 240 GB capacity
  • Dual LSI SandForce SF-2281 controllers
  • Toshiba 19 nm 16K page size MLC Sync-NAND Flash
  • Sequential read/write speed: 830/810 MB/s
  • Up to 100,000 4K read/write IOPS (Input/Output operations Per Second)
  • Legacy and UEFI BIOS support
  • Driver-free with TRIM support
  • Windows 7 / Windows 8 compatible
  • Windows 8 Secure Boot compatible
  • 157 x 120 x 20 mm
 Images courtesy of ASUS

Computex: ADATA Demonstrate Their XPG S920 Consumer SSDs

ADATA have been exhibiting a lot of SSDs at Computex 2013, we’ve already seen the SX1000 and SX2000 series but now its time to have a quick look at their XPG S920 series SSDs that they also showed us. These will be based off a Marvell made controller and hence there is no over-provisioning of capacity like on many Sandforce controllers. This means there are capacities of 128GB, 256GB and 512GB.  The drives uses a SATA III 6Gbps interface giving speeds of 530MB/s read and 480MB/s write with up to 80,000K IOPS on 4K random writes.

The XPG S920 series of SSDs pack 19nm MLC NAND flash and use a very slim profile 7mm design in the usual 2.5 inch SSD form factor. ADATA is backing these consumer SSDs with a 3 year warranty and they feature SMART, TRIM and NCQ support.

Stay tuned to eTeknix for more Computex coverage in our Computex section.

Image(s) courtesy of eTeknix at Computex

Computex: ADATA Reveals 1600GB SSD With SX2000 Enterprise Series

At Computex ADATA revealed an SSD that’d make most PC enthusiasts pretty darn jealous. Their new SX2000 SSD series revealed an absolute gem with a 1600GB model – yes that is 1600GB of SSD storage. This device is certainly no slouch on speeds either as ADATA have opted for a PCI Express Generation 2 4X interface that supports a mammoth 1800-2000 MB per second, meaning you can essentially read or write your entire capacity in 800 seconds – not bad at all. The controller that supports this is the Sandforce SFF-8639 and that is capable of 200,000 random read IOPS.

ADATA also showed off the rest of the series which included 800, 400, 200 and 100GB capacities. These all use the same specifications and have TRIM support, DEVSLP support and SMART support. The PCI express interface works by running a cable to a PCI Express riser card from the SSD drive itself. ADATA didn’t announce pricing or availability but expect these to cost a small fortune, though being aimed at the enterprise market this is hardly unexpected.

ADATA also displayed the SX1000 series alongside the SX2000 series but these are slightly more “normal” with a SATA III 6Gbps interface, a Sandforce SF-2500 or SF-2600 controller and read/write speeds of 550/500MB/s. 75,000 random read IOPS are delivered and the drive is available in 100, 200 and 400GB capacities. ADATA didn’t specify the NAND used in either drives but high-endurance MLC is likely give then 5 year warranties.

Stay tuned to eTeknix for more Computex coverage in our Computex section.

Image(s) courtesy of eTeknix at Computex