Scientists Use Fibre Optic Cable to Transmit 57Gbps

How fast is your internet? 1Mbps? 10Mbps? Are you lucky enough to get a 1Gbps? With governments all over the world now racing to deliver the best internet to everyone, the speed of your internet is quickly becoming a topic of hot debate. For those with speed hate, I am sorry. It would now seem that it is possible to transmit 57Gbps down a fibre optic cable. Sorry.

I apologise because like many I am someone who has been promised great speeds, but more often than not you find those speeds don’t seem to exist and you can almost hear that digital bleeping from dial-up coming to haunt you as you call it a night, letting your movie buff or your game download.

Researchers from the University of Illinois have pushed fibre optic technology to a new level by transmitting 57 gigabytes of data per second through a fibre optic cable, a whole 17 Gbps extra compared to those reported last year. What’s better about this you ask? The speed was achieved with no errors and then to prove the point they went and send 50Gbps while at temperatures of 85 degrees celsius.

The reason the temperature is important is because electrical components get warm over time (like the bottom of the laptop you’ve had resting on your lap while watching Netflix in bed), which can lead to reduced performance and damaged components. The team behind the idea hope that by showing that these speeds are available from room temperature to 85 degrees, companies will have no reason to push these systems out to the public.

You can read the paper that’s been published on the experiments here and begin to imagine how many games you could delete and download at 50 Gbps. So many games.

Amazon Passwords Could Have Been Leaked

It’s that time of the year again, when everyone goes crazy and starts buying ready for all the events and gift giving that is come over the next few months (some even preparing so much as to get some ordered for next year). Black Friday, one of the busiest shopping days of the year is upon us and with it a lot of people are looking and watching online stores waiting for that juicy one time deal they could quickly scope up before it all goes. To no surprise, Amazon is one of these online stores, so what does it mean when people started receiving emails asking them to change their passwords? That’s right another potential breach.

As reported by ZDNet, a selection of their readers received emails asking them to reset their password (the email was also sent via Amazons message centre, confirming that it came from a legitimate source). The reason given was that your password could have been stored on your device or transmitted in a way that exposed it to third parties.

Amazon continued to state they had corrected the issue, but that temporary passwords were being issued as a sign of caution.

Given recent hacks and breaches, it’s not surprising that Amazon is airing on the side of caution when it comes to people’s accounts, especially around this time of year.

Scientsits Find a Way to Wirelessly Transmit Energy across 55 Meters

Japanese scientists from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency have announced that they have been successful in transmitting energy wirelessly and with high accuracy, being able to microwave 1.8 kilowatts (just enough to heat a kettle) over a distance of 55 meters.

“This was the first time anyone has managed to send a high output of nearly two kilowatts of electric power via microwaves to a small target, using a delicate directivity control device,” a spokesperson for JAXA stated.

Before getting too excited, there is still a long way to go from here. The scientists’ ultimate goal is to set up solar satellites around 36,000 km of Earth’s surface in order to harness the Sun’s power and beam it back to the Earth’s surface via antennae. This means that, if proven successful, we could be looking at an unlimited energy solution. However, there is still a matter of taking everything from the planning stage to the actual application phase… and that takes time.

“But it could take decades before we see practical application of the technology – maybe in the 2040s or later,” the spokesperson stated. “There are a number of challenges to overcome, such as how to send huge structures into space, how to construct them and how to maintain them.”

Even so, given that the experiment will eventually take place and be successful, we are looking at one of the most important technological breakthroughs in human history.

Thank you Science Alert for providing us with this information