Microsoft Translator Can Now Translate Text From Images

Isn’t it just annoying when you go away on Holiday or spot something and sit there for five minutes wondering what the text even says? Microsoft is looking to make it a little easier on us with a Translator that won’t just do text but can also translate text from images.

While it was available on the Windows Phone since 2010 and managed to provide quick and accurate translations from just looking at a menu. Now the feature is coming to Android (with iOS getting the feature back in February), giving you the ability to quickly load and understand any of the 21 languages the app supports.

The Android app is getting a few other boosters alongside the new feature, with inline translations giving you the ability to hover over text and translate to any of the 50+ online libraries while an additional 30 libraries bring the offline language count to 43 in total.

While Google’s translate app has had the feature since 2012, the fact that even more apps are getting translators built it, for both text and Skype getting to translate calls via its universal translator, it could be only a matter of time before languages online mean nothing but a setting on your PC.

Man Pleads Guilty To Leaking US Military Aircraft Blueprints

When it comes to security and privacy, there is little more protected than military details. As a result, the information is often protected by several layers of protection, and even if these are breached the chances of it going unnoticed are even slimmer than being able to gain access in the first place. Something Su Bin found out the hard way when he pleaded guilty to leaking US military aircraft blueprints. Su Bin, a Chinese national, has pleaded guilty to illegally accessing sensitive military data and distributing this material to China for financial gain. Bin’s role in the scheme was to obtain access to Boeing and other companies servers, in the process retrieving information about their military aircraft

Su Bin, a Chinese national, has pleaded guilty to illegally accessing sensitive military data and distributing this material to China for financial gain. Bin’s role in the scheme was to obtain access to Boeing and other companies servers, in the process retrieving information about their military aircraft such as the C-17 and even fighter jets. Once he obtained access, he told two associates, un-named in his plea deal, which servers to hack and what information was useful on the projects. He even provided a translating service, converting the documentation from English to Chinese before sending it back to China, all at a cost.Sending both server details and names of US executives (and their emails)

After being caught in Canada in 2014 and then extradited to the US last month, Bin will now be charged with stealing data listed on the US Munitions List contained in the International Traffic in Arms Regulations.

With countries becoming more and more aware of the risks and dangers regarding the digital world, catching anybody is a stark warning that just because you can do something, doesn’t mean that you will get away with it.

Baidu Show Speech Recognition at GTC 2015

NVIDIA GTC 15: Baidu gave a keynote based around the speech recognition technology that they are working on and showed us some examples of how successful their process is, especially in comparison to a third party API that is currently available from other sources.

Below is a video showing exactly how they have developed their algorithm to not only focus on speech recognition, but also how the process can cope when extra noise is added, which is a real stumbling block for most speec recognition services on the market.

It is worth noting that the presentation examples were being operated real-time through the use of a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 graphics card.

Father and Son Develop Service Which Offers Multiple Language Support in a Single Video

Sometimes it is frustrating to watch a foreign film, especially when you have to read between the lines and make sense of a minimally translated dialog. A father and son thought about it and came to the same conclusion, so they went on developing a piece of software which will change all this.

The software resulted is called Alugha, which translated from Swahili means ‘one language’, having the software currently be in beta. Bern and Nikolas Korz, the people behind the software, are working to achieve native-language translation of movies, available within the original file, helping viewers concentrate more on the movie’s action. The idea behind Alugha was born when Bern was doing videos on YouTube and his own Channel, at which point he was asked to translate them in English. He later found out that the process was hard and time-consuming, therefore another alternative needed to be found. While searching for some piece of software to translate his movies, he found out that there was nothing of the sort available.

Bernd and his son Nikolas then set out to solve the problem at hand and came up with the current software, Alugha, concentrating at first on YouTube. The piece of software comes under the shape of an extension for all browsers. Furthermore, with the help of their HTML5 player, users can embed their own videos without the need of using the YouTube service. Producers can create and upload audio files in any language to the Alugha servers, having them connect to the same video on the back-end. Also, description and titles are translated to help viewers read them in their own language without the need of third-party software.

Alugha accepts audio files limited to 20 MB, having users restricted to upload them under the MP3 or WebM format. The audio file specs have been set to 160 Kbit/s or 190 Kbit/s rates for MP3 or full HD rates for WebM formats. Users can choose to switch languages in real-time, even when the video is playing, and Korz seen the piece of software a benefit to motion pictures, games, trailers, speeches and product demos. Having support only for YouTube at the moment, it is said that popular platforms such as Facebook and Vimeo are considered in the future, as well as support for iOS, Android and Windows Phone applications.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vGrkpTVLsg[/youtube]

In terms of language support, Alugha features most registered ISO-638-3 languages, focusing on the 50 most popular ones. Korz adds his opinion towards Alugha, stating it is a ‘massive energy saving’ piece of software when producing a movie, giving the option to attach different language tracks and increasing traffic to a single video while adding additional benefits to those using AdSense and Advertisements in their videos.

Alugha is said to come out of beta in August, bearing various extensions and a download section on the product’s website with links to different platforms and browsers. The software will have a free scheme for producers, providing the most basic support, with additional charges for those who want more features.

Thank you TheNextWeb for providing us with this information
Images and video courtesy of TheNextWeb

Live Voice Translation in Skype Might Come to Windows 8 Devices This Year

The language barrier is one of the most common problems encountered even today. Most modern and free translation programs, whether text-to-text, speech-to-speech or even speech-to-text give users a basic tool to understand and slide through the language barrier a bit, from text translation to webpage translations.

Microsoft apparently has been working on a feature for Skype to break through this issue with the help of the Skype Translator application. The company has just released the first beta version of the application, which was also demoed at the Code Conference. A preview of its potential can be viewed in the video below.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eu9kMIeS0wQ[/youtube]

Another interesting aspect of this application at hand is its ability to not only translate the language, but also relay it grammatically and syntactically correct, something not quite easy to achieve. The demo displays only its translation powers between English and German, but Microsoft stated it will add more language support later on.

The application might also not be free, given the amount of work and complexity required to achieve such results. What is known about the application is that Microsoft plans to release it by the end of the year and that it will first arrive to Windows 8 devices. Android and Macintosh devices including iOS should receive the application as well, but at a later date.

Thank you Android Police for providing us with this information
Image and video courtesy of Android Police