Kingston HyperX Savage 240GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


There have been a lot of PCIe, M.2 and new generation NVMe drives in the news lately and we’ve also tested some of them already, but the go-to standard for most people will still be the default SATA III connection for a while. Today I’m taking a closer look at such a drive and it’s a beauty at the same time, the brand new Kingston HyperX Savage SSD with 240GB capacity.

HyperX is Kingston’s gaming and high-end division and there is no doubt about that when opening up for this drive. It is presented in all its glory right away. The design looks great with the overall design resembling the X in HyperX. The red and white theme will also make it fit great with most gaming equipment as a lot of that carries the same

The design looks great with the overall design resembling the X in HyperX. The red and white theme will also make it fit great with most gaming equipment as a lot of that carries the same colour scheme.

The HyperX Savage SSD is built around the Phison PS3110-S10 SSD controller and paired with Toshiba’s A19nm MLC flash for great performance. It’s nice to see that Kingston also moves away from the SandForce controller in this drive series as they’re heavily outdated by now. This is without a doubt a great successor to the 3K drive and the Phison controller is probably the most powerful one available in the consumer market right now.

This is without a doubt a great successor to the 3K drive and the Phison controller is probably the most powerful one available in the consumer market right now.

The default 2.5-inch form factor with 7mm height makes the drive perfect for both desktop and laptop use. As always with Kingston drives you can get it either as just the drive or as an upgrade kit with external USB enclosure for easy migration from the old drive to the brand new HyperX Savage.

The speed rating on the HyperX Savage depends on the capacity it comes with and it is available from 120GB to 960GB. The 240GB model that I’m taking a look at today can perform up to 560MB/s read and 530MB/s at sequential compressible data, but its true strength lies with incompressible data and random performance.

The Savage can perform with up to 100K IOPS reading and 90K IOPS writing which is a difference that you’ll feel every day when working with your applications or playing your games.

 

The 240GB Savage SSD is rated for 306TB total bytes written (TBW) which equals to 1.19 drive writes per day (DWDP). The drive is backed by a 3-year warranty and has a life expectancy of 1 million hours (MTBF).

Kingston always has a great accessory bundle with their drives and you get both an internal 3.5-inch adapter and 9.5mm adapter brackets just as you get a copy of Acronis True Image HD cloning software and a cool HyperX sticker for your case.

Everything you need to make your upgrade as easy as possible and show off your HyperX pride at the same time.

Kingston HyperX Predator PCIe 480GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


HyperX is Kingston’s high-performance product division and it is logical that they released their new M.2 based SSD under this label. Today I’m taking the Kingston HyperX Predator PCIe 480GB Solid State Drive for a test ride on my test bench to find out just how great this new M.2 SATA-based drive can perform.

The Predator SSD offers a large capacity up to 480GB, but it is also available as a 240GB model for those that need less storage or just don’t want to spend as much on a storage drive as others. The drive is rated for speeds up to 1400MB/s reading and 1000MB/s writing and it is a perfect drive for ultra-responsive multitasking as well as just an overall faster system.

The drive is built around the PCIe Gen 2.0 x4 interface and comes as either just the M.2 drive or coupled with a half-height, half-length (HHHL) PCIe adapter like the one I’m having a look at today. The drive is a lot faster than the traditional SATA SSDs thanks to the increased bandwidth that the PCIe connection offers over the relative old SATA standard.

The drive is powered by a Marvell 88SS9293 controller and coupled with Toshiba A19 Toggle NAND to achieve this great performance. The drive further has 1GB of 1600MHz DDR3 memory in two 512MB packages for caching purposes and general operation. All in all, that is a lot of hardware packed onto this small 2280 gum stick shaped solid state drive.

Kingston’s HyperX Predator PCIe SSD has a mean time before failure of 1 million hours and this 480GB version is rated for 882TB total bytes written (TBW) which equals to 1.7 full drive writes per day (DWPD). The smaller 240GB model has an almost identical rating with 1.6 DWPD which equals to 415TB TBW over the drive’s lifetime.

Kingston opted for a fully black device and I like this. The black PCB is a nice touch and one that is followed through from M.2 SSD to PCIe adapter board. There is also an extra foam pad mounted next to the connector to stabilize the inserted M.2 drive and prevent accidental damage.

Kingston backs this drive with their great customer service and a three-year warranty. The package with the PCIe adapter also included a low-profile replacement bracket for mounting abilities in SSF chassis, a key for Acronis True Image disk cloning software, and a cool HyperX sticker for your case.

Time to dive into the tests and see how this drive performs, it sure sounds like an awesome one.

OCZ Vector 180 480GB in Four-Disk RAID Review

Introduction


We’ve recently taken a look at how two OCZ Vector 180 960GB drives would perform in a RAID setup and to no one’s surprise, they were amazing. So how can we kick this up a notch? Easy, we take four of these amazing OCZ Vector 180 drives and try a RAID setup on them; now this is what I call fun and I love being able to test this setup.

Okay, I have to admit right away that this setup is halfway cheated, yet it shouldn’t have any performance impact. I only have two 480GB drives, but I also have two 960GB drives that use the exact same components. This means that I’ll just treat the 960GB drives as 480 ones and it won’t have any impact on our tests except that it will have a slightly different total space displayed. It’s really rare that I have four disks of the same brand for such a test, and I just didn’t want to let this chance slip away – and I’m sure more than a few of our readers will appreciate to find out how four of these drives will handle themselves in a RAID environment.

The new OCZ Vector 180 is the follow-up drive to the already successful Vector 150 series and on the base it’s still the same drive. It has however gotten a refresh in both parts, performance, and features, and it’s a drive well worth the attention that it’s getting here. With four drives at my disposal, I also got all the RAID modes available that the Intel RST has to offer: RAID 0, 1, 5, and 10, and I’ll be testing the drives in each available setup. The only place where I’ll only be using the two 480GB drives is the RAID 1 setup and this is a natural limitation based on the setup. Two disks are just max here.

The Vector 180 drive is based on the well-known, and in my opinion amazing, Indilinx Barefoot 3 M00 controller and it’s coupled with Toshiba’s A19nm NAND that we’ve seen perform great in any drive that it’s been used in. The drive is categorized as an enthusiast drive and that with good reason, the performance is great with a rated sequential speed of 550MB/s while reading and 510-530MB/s at writing. The random performance gets close to the 100K on 4K benchmarks, which isn’t bad either, not at all.

All the basic features like SMART, TRIM, and Garbage collection that is a must in every SSD these days are covered, but OCZ didn’t stop there. They also took something that’s usually reserved for enterprise-class drives and added it to their consumer drive and it’s called PFM+. PFM+ stands for Power Failure Management Plus and it helps to prevent data loss in the event of a sudden power loss. The drive has built-in capacitors that can provide enough power to flush the data from the cache to the NAND in the case that the power to the system should fail. Critical data can be saved with addition and it’s a great feature to have in any system.

OCZ’s Vector 180 comes with an official endurance rating of 50GB/day which is quite impressive for both desktop and server-grade disks. It also carries the amazing 5-year ShieldPlus warranty if the worst case situation should happen, where you can get around the hassle and troubles of normal RMAs and just get a new drive instead of the failed. I can not stress enough how amazing this is and you should give this warranty an extra look before you purchase your next SSD. It might be enough to change your mind on what to get, I know it did for me.

When it comes to what is bundled, then we find the usual great content inside the OCZ packaging. We get both a 3.5-inch adapter for those cases that aren’t suited for 2.5-inch drives natively as well as a key for the Acronis True Image disk cloning software so we easily can clone our old and slow drive onto our new and fast SSD. Other available capacities besides the 480GB are 120GB, 240GB, and 960GB.

OCZ Vector 180 480GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


We have had a look at the 960GB capacity of the new Vector 180 series already and today it’s time to take a closer look at the smaller sibling with 480GB capacity. The new mainstream and entry-level server SSD is packed full of great features and performance, and the 480GB capacity will probably hit the sweet spot for most people interested in this drive.

The drive is aimed at the mainstream market but still delivers more performance than most do in this segment and it lands right in the middle of features and performance. OCZ’s Vector 180 is built around the in-house created Indilinx Barefoot 3 M00 controller that has been coupled with the latest generation of Toshiba’s A19 MLC NAND flash for great sequential speeds up to 550MB/s and a random performance up to 100k IOPS. This is surely a drive that will wake the interest of enthusiast.

The drive doesn’t just come with great speeds, it also has a great endurance with an official rating of 50GB/day. OCZ’s Power failure management plus (PFM+) is a great new feature that prevents partial data loss and corrupting in case of power failure. There are capacitors that ensure the data at rest is safe but all user data in the DRAM buffer will still be lost in the case of sudden power loss. The capacitors ensure that all metadata is safe and that the drive will continue to operate normally after a power loss, i.e. the NAND mapping table won’t be lost, which can brick the drive or at least slow down the next boot up as the drive has to go through recovery process. While not perfect, it’s a really great feature and extra security to have.

The 480GB model is using a total of 16 Toshiba A19nm NAND and two Micron RAM chips just like the 960GB model does, but they’re half the capacity, of course.

You can easily relax for the next five years as OCZ’ ShieldPlus warranty covers your drive, even without receipt or proof of purchase. This is absolutely one of the best warranty services around. Vector 180 comes with a full bundle including 3.5-inch adapter and Acronis True Image disk cloning software. Other available capacities are 120GB, 240GB, and 960GB

Silicon Power Slim S80 240GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


Silicon Power has been in the storage business for a long time and I’m glad to finally be able to put one of their drives on the bench and take it for a test run. Today I’m taking a closer look at the SP Slim S80 solid state drive that comes with promises impressive performance and is available with capacities up to 960GB. It is however, the 240GB model that I’m taking a look at today.

The Slim S80 is equipped with a Phison PS3108-S8 SATA-to-Flash micro-controller to deliver sequential transfer rates up to 550MB/s reads 500MB/s writes while offering impressive 4K random speeds of up to 80,000 IOPS. With such a performances, the Slim S80 can significantly reduce both boot times and quickly load applications as well as provide a higher reliability than traditional hard disk drives and provide higher reliability over traditional hard drive.

Silicon Power’s Slim S80 is carrying its name thanks to the 7mm height for use in ultrabooks, ultra slim notebooks, and similar narrow spaced usage areas; on top of that it only weighs 63 grams. Solid state drives are perfect to use in mobile devices thanks to the lack of mechanical parts so they aren’t affected by shocks and vibrations in the same way.

Built with both S.M.A.R.T., Wear Leveling techniques, and Error Correction Code, the Slim S80 should guarantee data safety on top of the great performance and a long lifespan. The used Phison controller also supports AES encryption to keep your data safe and DevSleep for a low power consumption in mobile devices.

Specifications

  • Capacity: 32GB/60GB/120GB/240GB/480GB/960GB
  • Dimensions: 100mm x 69.85mm x 7mm
  • Weight: 79g
  • Vibration Resistance Test: 20G
  • Shock Resistance Test: 1500G Max
  • Read up to 550MB/s、Write up to 500MB/s
  • 7mm slim design suitable for Ultrabooks and Ultra-slim notebooks
  • SATA III 6Gbps backward compatible with SATA II 3Gbps
  • Supports TRIM command and Garbage Collection technology
  • NCQ and RAID ready
  • Implemented with ECC technology to guarantee data transmission reliability
  • Built-in with SMART monitoring system
  • 3-year warranty

Besides the Phison controller, the S80 has 16 of Toshiba’s 19nm flash chips and a 256MB Nanya RAM chip.

OCZ Announced Intrepid 3700 Series SSDs up to 2TB

OCZ announced a new series of SATA SSDs to their Intrepid 3000 enterprise portfolio, the new Intrepid 3700 SSD Series. The new drives are said to deliver superior performance and I/O latency responses to dramatically improve application performance and I/O efficiencies, but best of all is the increased capacity to 2TB, OCZ’s largest capacity enterprise SATA SSDs to date.

The new drive isn’t just available as 2TB though, the three common and smaller capacities 240GB, 480GB, and 960GB will be available too. The drives are built with the well-known Toshiba A19nm NAND and controlled by OCZ’s Everest 2 controller with optimized firmware architecture and advanced flash management.

The Intrepid 3700 series has a performance rating of 540MB/s for sequential reads and 470MB/s for sequential writes. The random 4k performance for 4KB blocks is 91k IOPS for reads and 13K for writes. Feature wise the drives include the basics such as TRIM, SMART, and Garbage collection, but also Error correction coding, end-to-end data path protection, power loss protection and internal SSD RAID that duplicates all data stored so if there are flash errors a backup exists to provide additional data safeguards.

OCZ guarantees up to one complete Drive Write Per Day for 5 years for the Intrepid 37000 series (half for the 2TB model) and it is ideally suited for such read-intensive applications as online archiving, media streaming, video on demand (VOD), virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) and web browsing applications.

Thanks to OCZ for providing us with this information

OCZ Vector 180 960GB SSDs in RAID Review

Introduction


I often read the comment ‘that would be awesome with two 1TB SSDs’ or ‘I would love two of these new SSDs for a RAID setup’ in our comment sections, both here on the page and on Facebook. So what would be more obvious than testing the brand new OCZ Vector 180 960GB Solid State Drive in the available RAID setups.

With two disks at my disposal, my options are limited to just RAID 1, RAID 0, Recovery and the normal single disk modes. Each mode has its ups and downs and there really isn’t one that is better than the others, it comes down to your personal needs. Whether you need capacity, redundancy, speed or a just the baseline, that is your choice.

The new enthusiast drives from OCZ are built on a solid principle of proven components. At the heart is the Indilinx Barefoot 3 M00 SSD controller and it is paired with Toshiba’s A19nm MLC NAND. This is a great combination that will give you top speeds on a reliable drive full of features. The basics are covered with SMART, TRIM, and Garbage collection, but the Vector 180 also features Power Failure management plus (PFM+) to prevent data loss in the event of a sudden power loss.

OCZ’s Vector 180 comes with an official endurance rating of 50GB/day, quite impressive. It also carries the amazing 5-year ShieldPlus warranty if the worst case situation should happen and comes bundled with both Acronis True Image disk cloning software and a 3.5-inch adapter bracket. Other available capacities are 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB

We saw sequential speeds up to 550MB/s while reading and 510MB/s while writing in our one disk review, but how well will the Vector 180 perform in the different RAID setups?

OCZ Vector 180 960GB Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


It has been a while since OCZ first introduced us to the Vector 180 series, actually almost a year. The company wasn’t fully happy with the drive back then and decided to keep working on it until they had the best possible product to release. Now it’s finally that time and the OCZ Vector 180 drives are ready and released.

The first drive I’ll be taking a look at in the new Vector 180 series is the 960GB model, the biggest. This is the first time OCZ is releasing a client-level SATA SSD in the 1TB category, and one I’m sure will be welcomed by many users. SSD prices have dropped and these large sizes are increasingly becoming a valid option for more and more people.

The OCZ Vector 180 is built around the in-house created Indilinx Barefoot 3 M00 controller and coupled with the latest generation of Toshiba A19 MLC NAND flash for great sequential speeds up to 550MB/s while reading and 510MB/s while writing while also performing up to 100k IOPS; this surely is a drive that will wake the interest of enthusiasts.

The drive is aimed at the mainstream but delivers more performance than most in this segment and it lands right in the middle between performance and features. Not only does the drive come with great speeds, it also has great endurance with an official rating of 50GB/day. Power failure management plus (PFM+) is another new feature that prevents partial data loss and corrupting in case of power failure.

There are capacitors that ensure the data at rest is safe but all user data in the DRAM buffer will still be lost in the case of sudden power loss. The capacitors ensure that all metadata is safe and that the drive will continue to operate normally after a power loss, i.e. the NAND mapping table won’t be lost, which can brick the drive or at least slow down the next boot up as the drive has to go through recovery process. While not perfect, it’s a really great feature and extra security to have and one that you mostly find in the enterprise class drives.

The Vector 180 SSD is using a total of 16 NAND chips with 8 on each side of the PCB to achieve the 960GB capacity. To ensure that the transfer rates stay up and you have a smooth operation, the Vector 180 960GB SSD has two Micron RAM chips which should be 512MB.

The drive carries OCZ’s 5-year ShieldPlus warranty where a purchase receipt isn’t required and all defective drives will be replaced with brand new units. It also comes with a bundle of accesories, including a 3.5-inch adapter and Acronis True Image disk cloning software. Other available capacities are 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB

Lite-On Introduced World’s First TLC NAND-Based SSD With Advanced LDPC Tech

During a press conference at CES, Lite-On Storage introduced its new CV2 family of solid-state drives packed with next-generation low-density parity-check (LDPC) technology that is said to extend the endurance by up to 33%. The new drives are powered by Marvell’s four-channel 88SS1074 controller with 256-bit AES encryption and DEVSLP and coupled with Toshiba’s A19 NAND.

The result is an SSD that is rated for 2,000 program-erase cycles, comes as 128GB, 256GB, and 512GB capacities, and is backed by a three-year warranty. Sequential read performance tops out at 500 MB/s over SATA 6Gb/s, while random 4KB throughput hits the 100,000 IOPS mark

“Advances in manufacturing technology are responsible for facilitating higher-capacity SSDs at lower prices. The challenge becomes keeping their ones and zeros straight as more bits are stored in each memory cell. Today’s BCH error-correcting codes do a fair job of maintaining reliability, even faced with modern TLC NAND. But LDPC is universally accepted as the future, and Lite-On is leading the charge forward with its CV2 SSD family. The CV2 is built on Marvell’s newest mainstream processor and outfitted with an advanced implementation of LDPC. So, even as you enjoy enthusiast-class responsiveness at value-oriented prices, you can be sure the most cutting-edge storage technology is keeping your data safe.”

No word on pricing or availability yet, but expect both to follow soon.

Thanks to Lite-On for providing us with this information