Sky Mile Tower Aims To Reinvent The Skyscraper

The evolution of the humble skyscraper has been nothing short of amazing over the last half a century, from the US and its range of towering buildings that have included the “Trump international Tower” which stands at an eye- watering 423 metres tall (1,389ft) to the current king which is situated in Dubai and goes by the name the “Burj Khalifa“, this structure stands at an incredible 829.8 metres (2,722ft).

Surely this will not be beaten? Well, apparently it might well be after it was recently announced that a new structure is in the planning stage and goes by the name the “Sky Mile Tower”, below is a summary concerning this proposed building.

  • The Sky Mile Tower will have a hexagonal design.
  • The Sky Mile Tower building will be around 1 mile high
  • The Sky Mile Tower is expected to house 55,000 people
  • The Sky Mile Tower will be surrounded by a series of hexagonal designed man-made islands.

Below is the concept computer generated designs for this new building, as you can see, they are certainly exciting. The islands will also be used with the aim of both protecting the city from flooding and also acting as a foundation for homes with the potential to house 500,000 people, the building is also earmarked for the city of Tokyo.

There will also be various multilevel sky lobbies that will house among other things restaurants, gyms and various health clinics. This all sounds amazing, but, there is one slight caveat when you consider the estimated completion of construction is expected to be around 2045.

Below is the current world’s tallest building, in case you’re wondering, it is the one on the left.

It will be interesting to note if there will ever be a limit to how far a skyscraper can go, after all, there surely has to be a ceiling.

Images courtesy of burjkhalifa and metro

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Tokyo Police to Launch Anti-Drone Drone Squad

Many countries are beginning to come up with their own answer to drones being used dangerously or criminally. Now Japan has moved to restrict the usage of personal drones too, following an episode where a drone carrying a small amount of radioactive materials managed to land on the office of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s office in April. And while most nations have settled on simply placing legal restrictions on drones or requiring registration, Japan plans to do this and more, with the Tokyo Police Department planning to roll out a squad of anti-drone drones.

This week Japan amended its aviation act to include limitations on drones, with Paul Haswell, a partner at legal firm Pinsent Masons, telling the BBC, “In Japan, it is illegal to pilot drones over certain areas such as airports and power plants, over roads, or above a height of 150m.” Not only this, but some public places such as city parks also have restrictions in place that outlaw drone use in them, which is sure to annoy drone enthusiasts living in Japan’s crowded cities.

Police in Tokyo have demonstrated that their plan against nuisance drones in the city will be the deployment of their own drone craft, equipped with nets to catch the troublemaking drone. The strategy put in place will involve informing the operator via loudspeaker of their infraction, which if ignored will prompt the use of the police drones. And the Japanese police take drone incidents seriously since the April incident, believing that terrorist attacks using explosive carrying drones are a real threat and defending national functions is their top priority.

It is certainly interesting to see authorities taking to the sky with their own drones to deter potential menaces, but is it the best way? Only time will tell for the citizens of Tokyo.

See Famous Paintings as Raw Data

Now we all know how much effort can go into a painting by a person, but exactly how much goes into a painting by a computer? Japanese artist Yousuke Ozawa set out to demonstrate that by creating a series of artwork that showcases some of history’s most famous pieces in raw data.

Yes, what you’re seeing above is the legendary painting ‘The Scream’ converted into its raw data. The idea of the artwork is to showcase just how much code is behind an amazing painting such as that and how computers intricately replicate the work of the artist on our screens.

“Art is now seen through google images or wallpapers. However, we are actually looking at a series of numbers and letters instead of actual paint. Through a generator I retrieved the codes of each paintings I found on google images and printed them out, framed and showcased them at a galleries in Tokyo.” – Yousuke Ozawa

The pieces have been displayed in Tokyo, but we can all see them (not entirely in raw data thankfully) on Ozawa’s website.

Source: Data Visualization Via: Gizmodo

First Robot Olympics To be Hosted by Tokyo in 2020

Japan has high hopes of bringing a new type of Olympics in 2020, alongside the actual summer games. Shimzo Abe, Japan’s Prime Minister, said that he hopes to bring the world’s first Robot Olympics, having discussed the creation of ‘robotic revolution’. He apparently wants to gather all robots around the world and place them in an event where they could compete based on their technological skills. Abe states that this event could increase the value seen in the robotics industry, while also boosting the nation’s economy and encourage people to sign up for the robot factory workforce.

It is not currently clear on what to expect from the event just yet. The Prime Minister is said to be keen on showing off technical talents for robots, focusing on care and industrial use. It is said that there are more and more reports about robots taking over human jobs, with 47% of the US labor (702 humans) being threatened by the change. One example of a technologically advanced robot is Baxter, made by Rethink Robotics, who can already learn from human factory supervisors. Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk are also said to be working on a robot that can think like a person, with many more examples being out there. Therefore, it’s everybody’s guess on what to expect from the 2020 Robot Olympics.

Thank you comparemymobile.com for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of comparemymobile.com

Android News Casters Hitting the Scene in Japan

Japan recently facilitated the ‘Andriod: What is Human?’ exhibition which brought to the table some exciting new advancements in lifelike technology.

In the future, it is quite possible we’ll be read the news by Android robots closely resembling those pictured above. Not only do these ‘robots’ provide a pretty face, they can interact with humans, read news headlines, tell jokes and read out Tweets – basically anything a regular news presenter is tasked to do.

The two Androids shown on Tuesday are called Kodomoroid and Otonaroid, they’re designed to mimic gestures and movements of humans whilst upkeeping a lifelike appearance.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGaBQZ195tA[/youtube]

To show off the full capabilities of their creations, the scientists interacted with the androids and displayed their news reading functionality. Kodomoroid was heard making fun of Hiroshi Ishiguro stating “You’re starting to look like a robot!” after she had delivered her news piece to the audience as seen in the video above. Otonariod unfortunately caught stage fright, and after a quick reboot said “I’m a little bit nervous” – which is understandable in such a large crowd of stunned journalists.

These Androids will be held at Tokyo’s National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in a bid to interact with visitors and help Ishiguro collect research information on human reactions to his creations.

Ishiguro also proudly stated:

“You can take my androids on planes. The torso in the suitcase and the head in carry-on” Breitbart

Will we see these more in the future? The answer is likely yes. Should we be worried about losing all of our jobs to ‘the machine’? That is for you to decide!

Image courtesy of Breitbart

Levitating Objects With The Help Of Sound Waves

Researchers in Tokyo have put a new twist on the use of sound to suspend objects in air. They’ve used ultrasonic standing waves to trap pieces of wood, metal, and water – and even move them around. They have used sound to levitate objects in previous experiments, dating back decades. But that work has largely relied on speakers that were set up in a line to bounce sound waves off a hard surface.

The new experiment uses four speakers to surround an open square area that’s about 21 inches wide. Four phased arrays use standing waves to create an ultrasonic focal point in that space, as the researchers explain in a video about their work. That means that they generate a suspending force — which can then trap particles and objects in mid-air. The objects can be moved around by manipulating the waves. The device uses sound at the frequency of 40 kHz — beyond the upper limits of human hearing at 20 kHz.

The University of Tokyo researchers’ video, called Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation [Acoustic Levitation], expands on a research article they submitted to arXiv, a science publishing site maintained by Cornell University, last month. They have described their work as following:

“Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its center is also utilized. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localized standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays.”

The Japanese researchers, namely Yoichi Ochiai, Takayuki Hoshi, and Jun Rekimoto, say they’re looking at ways to manipulate larger objects. And it seems they also see their device as a potential option for moving items around in low-gravity environments, such as in space or orbit.

“It has not escaped our notice that our developed method for levitation under gravity suggests the possibility of developing a technology for handling objects under microgravity,” they write.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odJxJRAxdFU[/youtube]

Thank you NPR for providing us with this information
Image and video courtesy of NPR

Microsoft Returning To Tokyo Game Show For 2013

Microsoft are set to make a return to Tokyo in a big way, after skipping out on events for 2012 in Japanese games market they’re set to take their new toys to battle it out with Sony on yet another battle ground.

Microsoft has historically had no luck in Japanese marks with their Xbox products, the general gaming community has little time for a western developed and focused console from a company that they have little love for in general, especially when Sony are Japanese and have local developers catering to the desires of the population, especially a large selection of JRPG titles for the Sony console.

Yet Microsoft don’t often back down from a fight, most often because they can financially afford to take the risk more than most companies and this year should be an exciting one for Japanese audiences who have been showing interest in the new Xbox One more than they have previous Xbox consoles, which is interesting given that many retailers don’t even stock the Xbox 360 in the country due to lack of popularity!

Microsoft have to make some big changes if they want to succeed in this market, JRPG is a tough market to crack and NFL titles are of little use there so Microsoft will need to have some new development deals under its belt to cater to that audience in a big way, especially if they want to compete with Sony on their home turf.

Thank you Fudzilla for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of TGS.

Sony-backed ISP launches fastest internet connection for a home user with 2Gbps speed


So-net Entertainment, Japanese internet service provider backed by Sony, has launched their ‘Nuro’ fiber-based 2Gbps Internet surface, most likely the fastest internet connection in the world for home use. The company uses a service called Gigabit-capable Optics network (GPON) which allows 2.488 Gbps downstream.

The connection started on Monday, and it will provided to homes, apartments and even small businesses in Tokyo and six prefectures. The connection will cost U.S. $51 per month with a 2 year contract, followed by Approx. U.S. $535 as Installation fee which is currently waived off those who apply for the connection via online, which will include optical network unit which is designed to handle high speeds.
The user will be getting an upload speed of 1 Gbps.

The Japanese government has been strongly promoting fiber connections for residences, therefore making them as one of the world leaders for fiber connections. About 25% of the residences in the country use the fiber, which makes it second highest rate in the world to adopt this connection type. UAE starts at #1 spot with over 70%. Most of the population in Tokyo reside in very small apartments, therefore making it easier for the companies to install fiber services. As of now, providing 1Gbps connection is very common.

ONU are used in homes and small business to convert fiber to broadband internet as the speed exceeds the bandwidth throughput of most consumer-grade network adapters, therefore the end users are unlikely to see 2Gbps speeds.

Source: PC World