DJI Have Created A Social Network For Drone Users

Enjoy your food or a video game? There’s a social network for that, all designed around bringing you together with like-minded people who all enjoy what you enjoy. If you are a fan of drones, then why not try DJI+Discover, the social network for drone users.

Create a profile and ask all those questions you’ve wondered about new parts, how to build your personalised drone or the best drone on the market with like-minded people. If you just like the idea of drones you can also use the app to search for professional drone pilots or even drone photographers (that is people who take photos and videos with drones).

With options to filter a map of your surrounding area between all, social and professional, you can quickly filter out the people you want to connect with. As an added bonus why not check out its recommended flying spots and the user-submitted photos, seeing the area around you from a drone’s point of view.

With options and choices galore, why not check out the app if you are interested in, want to hire or just curious about drones and their users. With the ability to quickly organise and share materials, drone users should check out the app and share their photos for the world to see with aspiring and experienced drone users.

Google Rolling Out An App For Live Video Lessons From Experts Named Helpouts

Google is launching a new product it’s calling “Helpouts.” It’s a new website that allows users to get in touch with experts and pay them for “services” over video chat. Google is imagining that it will be used for things like cooking tips, home repair, guitar lessons, and even healthcare. The service is now live with a small set of partners, including Weight Watchers, Sephora, and One Medical. Google is vetting anybody that wants to offer Helpout services with a full background check and keeping the categories of services offered relatively short.

The video-chat services will be offered in a wide range of prices, from free with volunteers up to $20 per hour or more. Google says it has no intention of allowing “adult” content on Helpouts. Users will be able to rate the experts they work with and said experts will have a few tools to block users, should it come to that. For all of it, Google gets a 20 percent cut and is offering a money-back guarantee if things don’t work out.

The website for Hangouts looks very much like a one-off custom version of Google+, and even shares some of the same Hangouts on Air features that have been baked into that product. Each expert has a landing page where users can schedule a future Helpout or start one immediately. Users are identified with their public Google+ profiles, so each party knows who is calling, but nothing is posted publicly to Google+. If both parties agree, a Helpout chat can be saved for later review.

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Some of those policies don’t apply to the health section of Helpouts, however, where Google says it applies slightly stricter rules surrounding a user’s identity and privacy. It also claims that any health-related Helpout will be HIPAA compliant.

Although it’s a small launch, Google VP of Engineering Udi Manber was bullish on Helpouts’ future. Likening current skepticism about Helpouts to how some felt about online shopping in the early days of the internet, Manber repeated over and over at a press event today that “in the end, convenience and efficiency always win.”

Thank you The Verge for providing us with this information
Image and video courtesy of The Verge