BBC Micro Bit Shipping Date Revealed

BBC’s Micro Bit pocket-sized and programmable computer is an amazing little piece of technology, but the best of all is that one million of them will be given free to any year 7 pupils across the UK. Originally the BBC Micro Bit should have started shipping out October last year, but there were issues with the power and the project release got pushed back. At first, it was said that teachers should have the new units in December last year with students receiving them early this year. But that didn’t happen and it got pushed once again. Last month we got another minor delay as teachers already should have had their units ahead of the February half term, but that didn’t happen either.

Enough with the old bad news, time for the good news. The Micro Bit is ready and broadcaster has confirmed a countrywide roll-out of the one million devices for pupils will begin before easter. Naturally they won’t send out all at once, but they will start to ship officially on March the 22nd. So mark your calendars if you got children of that age, you might have new toys to play with soon.

Sinead Rocks, head of BBC learning, said: “It has been a joy to see these micro:bits make their way to educators across the country over the last couple of weeks. It feels like this adventure into the world of coding is really gaining pace. And so it’s with great excitement that we will be starting our delivery to pupils on March 22.”

The Micro bit (micro:bit) is a handheld and fully-programmable computer that encourages children to get creative with technology. The 4cm by 5cm device is the successor to the popular 1980s home computer, BBC Micro, and includes a Bluetooth antenna, USB plug and a processor, linked to a printed circuit board with 25 red LED lights which flash messages.

The BBC is yet to announce when the Micro Bit will be available for the public to buy and how much it will cost us ordinary mortals.

Parents Will Be Reported by Head Teachers If Their Children Play GTA or COD

British parents are now in danger of being reported to the police and social services if they let their children play videos games not suited for their age, specifically mentioned, were games like Call of Duty and Grand Theft Auto.

A letter sent by a group of schools in Cheshire raised concerns about the “levels of violence and sexual content” young people are being exposed to by playing games such as Call of Duty and Grand Theft Auto which have a PEGI 18 classification. If teachers are made aware of children playing these games then they will contact police and social services.

The fear is that the games violent content could lead to children being left more vulnerable to grooming and abuse. The letter goes further than video games and also recommends that children don’t use Facebook or Whatsapp, but rather other social platforms geared for their generation and not adults.

The letter is clearly a result of the pressure put on teachers and social workers by David Camerons announcement that they could face up to five years in prison if they don’t speak out about suspicions of children that are being neglected or abused. Headteacher Mary Hennessy Jones, who helped draft the letter, told the Sunday Times: “We are trying to help parents to keep their children as safe as possible in this digital era.”

The message from Nantwich Education Partnership has however been criticised by parents as going too far by threatening parents rather than helping them. Margaret Morrissey, of Parents Outloud, told the newspaper: “Accepting the huge concerns about these violent games and their effect on children, I think the schools are stepping outside the realm of what is probably acceptable.”

Thanks to DailyMail for providing us with this information