Intel Launches Braswell Entry-level SoCs

Intel has launched the brand new Braswell SoCs that will take the place of the current Bay Trail-D SoCs. The four new SoCs are built on the same 14nm process as Broadwell CPUs, with two dual-core and two quad-core models.

The two new dual-core Braswell parts that are in the Celeron line, the N3000 and the N3050. They both have GPUs with a base frequency of 320MHz and boost to 600MHz and 1MB of L2 cache. The Celeron N3000 has a base clock of 1.04GHz and boosts to 2.08GHz. The N3050 is clocked higher with a base clock of 1.60GHz and a boost of 2.16GHz.

The quad-core Braswell parts both have 2MB of L2 cache with a 640MHz GPU that will boost to 700MHz. The Celeron N3150 comes in with a base clock of 1.6GHz and boosts up to 2.08GHz.  The Pentium N3700 has the same base of 1.6GHz but boosts higher, up to 2.4GHz.

All Braswell SoCs support up to DDR3-1600 memory and have a TDP of 6W, all except the N3000 which comes in with a TDP of 4W.

Source: TechSpot

Leaked CPU-Z Images Reveal AMD Carrizo APU A10-8890K Specs

A CPU-Z image which appears to detail AMD’s next-generation APU, the A10-8890K, has apparently been leaked. WCCFTech has found the image via Guru3D, but at this point it should be taken as a rumour, since nothing has been officially announced.

The CPU-Z image appears to show that AMD is still keeping the current APU name, having it part of the A10 series, possibly the A-10 Elite. The K suffix at the end shows that the APU in question has an unlocked multiplier and the ‘Elite Hexa-Core’ present in the AMD logo indicates that the APU comes with 6 cores. Also, the 95W TDP and 4.4 Ghz core clock makes it an impressive piece.

The latest AMD APU appears to be based on the FM3 socket, which has been stated to come in 2016, which leads to two possibilities here. The first is that the report from AMD was inconclusive and the APU might come early than reported, or the leaked CPU-Z image does not display an actual Carrizo APU.

The CPU is said to boast Excavator cores, the latest revision of the Bulldozer architecture. This might be the case in the leaked image, having it show a high core clock and number of cores. However, the L2 cache appears to show 3 x 1024 KB, which is said to be very low for a 6-core CPU. AMD might have something up its sleeve with some stacked DRAM lifting the L2 Cache, but nothing is sure at the moment.

Thank you WCCFTech for providing us with this information
Images courtesy of WCCFTech

GIGABYTE GeForce GTX Enabled BRIX Gaming PC in the Wild

Since the launch of the Intel NUC platform, there has been a lot of discussions about its small form factor and how more power could be harnessed from it and GIGABYTE managed to give a solution to this in the shape of the BRIX.

Though its evolution, the BRIX has been transformed plenty of times and has since overtaken the Intel NUC on the higher-end platform. Fast forward to the present day, and we can see that the range of BRIX products has been expanded upon with the latest GeForce GTX 760 creation with Haswell Core i5 processor.

The latest iteration includes a 47W TDP Intel Core i5-4200H processor clocked to 2.8GHz (3.4Ghz with Turbo) and GTX 760 from the green team with a TDP of 170W which as we know in a device of this size, is vitally important due to cooling issues. Other features of the new NVIDIA powered BRIX is support for mSATA and 2.5″ SSD and HDD storage solutions, 802.11ac wireless, Bluetooth 4.0 and Gigabit Ethernet.

Connectivity wise, you’ll find dual HDMI ports and a single mini DisplayPort and a whopping four USB 3.0 ports (native thanks to the Haswell processor).

Availability is a bit scarce on dates right now, but end of May/June is looking likely with Computex right around the corner and with rumours of an i7 based processor possibly being added in, GIGABYTE have got a mammoth machine with this new model, and it’s still stupidly tiny too.

Three New Intel Xeon E5-4600 v2 CPUs In The Works

Intel is going to introduce Ivy Bridge-EP microprocessors in Q1 2014, branded as Xeon E5-4600 v2, for quad-socket servers. Along with the two Xeon E5-4600 v2 models, the E5-4610 v2 and E5-4657L v2, that were found in a CPU support list on the ASRock website, intel also added three new Xeon E5 microprocessors to the support list. The CPUs in question are the E5-4607 v2, E5-4627 v2 and E5-4650 v2.

CPU World detailed the specs of these new CPUs. First of all, the Xeon E5-4650 v2 processor will have a 2.4 GHz operating frequency and is rumored to have 10 cores judging by the 25 MB L3 cache. The CPU also matches M1 stepping, usually used by 8 and 10-core Xeon E5-xxxx v2 processors and works on a 95 Watt TDP.

The second CPU, the Xeon E5-4627 v2,has a 3.3 GHz frequency and again is only rumored to have 8 cores judging by the integrated 16 MB of level 3 cache. It also takes advantage of M1 core stepping and having a higher frequency, it will work at a much higher 130 Watt TDP.

Last but not least, the third CPU, the Xeon E5-4607 v2 is clocked at 2.6 GHz and is rumored to have 6 cored based on its 15 MB of cache. The processor has S1 core stepping, that was used by 4 and 6-core Ivy Bridge-EP microprocessors and it consumes as much as the Xeon E5-4650 v2, meaning 95 Watt TDP.

Other details or features about the three new Xeon E5-4600 CPUs is unknown at this time, but more details should be available in the near future.

Thank you CPU World for providing us with this information

Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 3GB Graphics Card Review

It’s that time of year again where NVIDIA have a new series of cards in the pipelines and as we have seen running up to today, the number of rumours and leaks that have been flying about are as profound as ever. For some this leads to pure confusion as to what is to be seen and what is complete rubbish, and for people like myself it leads to pure frustration as I know all the true facts and figures, meaning that when I see the rumours and false facts floating around I can do nothing but sit and wait until the NDA lifts to put a number of these claims to rest with the real specifications and performance figures behind the new cards.

So here we have it, the GTX 780 – the first in the new line of Kepler based 700 series cards and before we get too far into the nitty gritty of what’s new in the 700 series, I want to make the following fact clear and true – the GTX 780 CANNOT be flashed in any way to effectively turn it into Titan. There are a number of reasons for this; first off, whilst both cards share the same GK110 core, the 780 has far less CUDA cores, is a different revision of the core chip and has less texture units on-board. On top of this, there is also half the amount of video memory and a number of components in the power region of the PCB are missing as the 780 does not require these as opposed to Titan.

Point out of the way, NVIDIA’s new 700 series cards are here to replace the ever popular 600 series, although they are not a re-hash and re-brand of 6xx cards as some may presume. Whilst the GK110 cores may be featured on both 600 and 700 series cards, they will have subtle variances to them, mainly on the front of CUDA core count and texture filters and so forth.

So what is the 780 in relation to the 600 series cards. Whilst it may look like Titan, it is a slightly lower performing card. Titan is more geared towards users with multiple high resolution displays and thus the higher 6GB of GDDR5 memory that it encompasses. The 780 whilst still home to 3GB of GDDR5 is more aimed at users who are going to be gaming on a single screen at high resolutions with all the settings turned to 11. Over its predecessor, the GTX 680, the 780 has 50% more CUDA cores with a count of 2034, 50% more memory, up to 3GB from 2GB and overall a 34% increase in performance. Interestingly enough, GTX 580 users who upgrade to a 780 will see a whopping 70% gain in performance between the two cards and a 25-30% gain can also be found over AMD’s 7970.