Samsung Start Shipping 15.36TB SSD Drives

Samsung is one of the key companies when it comes to providing memory to everything from your phone to your PC. With their latest revelation being the creation of a 256GB flash memory chip, it was only a matter of time before they made the news again. Today they’ve done just that by releasing to the public the 15.36TB SSD.

Stored within a 2.5-inch enclosure, the latest evolution of the SSD means all that more trouble for traditional hard drives which have slowly been losing out to the SSD’s, winning only on cost per GB (something that solid state technology has been catching up on quickly).

While it would be amazing to plug this drive into your computer or laptop, it may be a while before your everyday device can deal with this drive as it requires a 12Gbps SAS interface, with sequential read and write speeds going up to 1,200 MBps.

While it is currently being released with memory choices going from 960GB to the 15.36TB version, a 480GB version is expected to be released later in the year for those needing a little less storage.

Do you use an SSD? What would you store on an SSD of this size? With no price detailed yet, what do you expect this monster will set you back?

Image courtesy of Gordan Mah Ung.

Energy-Friendly Chip Could Boost Neural Networks

The quest to gain a greater insight into artificial Intelligence has been exciting and has also opened up a range of possibilities that have included “convolutional neural networks”, these are large visual networks of simple information-processing units which are loosely modelled on the anatomy of the human brain.

These networks are typically implemented using the more familiar graphics processing units (GPUs). A mobile GPU might have as many as 200 cores or processing units, this means that it is suited to “simulating a network of distributed processors”. Now, a further development in this area could lead to the potential for a specifically designed chip that has a sole purpose of implementing a neural network.

MIT researchers have presented the aforementioned chip at the “International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco”. The advantages of this chip include the notion that it is 10 times more efficient than an average mobile GPU, this could lead, in theory, to mobile devices being able to run powerful artificial intelligence algorithms locally, rather than relying on the cloud to process data.

The new chip, coined “Eyeriss” could, lead to the expansion of capabilities that includes the Internet of things, or put simply, where everything from a car to a cow, (yes apparently) would have sensors that are able to submit real-time data to networked servers. This would then open up horizons for artificial intelligence algorithms to make those important decisions.

Before I sign off I wanted to further delve into the workings of a neural network, the workings are that it is typically organised into layers, each of these layers contains a processing node. Data is then divided up among these nodes within the bottom layer, each node then manipulates the data it receives before passing it on to nodes within the next layer. This process is then repeated until “the output of the final layer yields the solution to a computational problem.” It is certainly fascinating and opens up a world of interesting avenues with which to explore, when you combine science and tech, the outcome is at the very least educational with the potential for it to be life changing.         .

Intel 750 Series SSD Firmware Update Improves Boot Times

Intel’s 750 series SSD incorporates astonishingly high read/write speeds but encountered slow boot times compared to traditional SATA storage devices. Thankfully, Intel has released a firmware update today which addresses the prolonged boot problems. To upgrade your SSD to the latest version, all you have to is download the Intel Solid-State Drive Data Center Tool. Once downloaded, launch the installer and you should encounter much more consistent boot speeds.

However, PCIe drives require a longer period to initialize and it’s highly doubtful if the boot speeds will match SATA SSDs. Despite this, the drive’s extra few seconds on boot isn’t going to be a major issue as NVME SSDs are mainly used for professional situations and these machines are on for days at a time. I’m also pleased to see Intel addressing this and PCIe SSDs offer such an enormous performance boost that they could replace SATA drives in the future. Although, the average end-user isn’t going to notice a distinct difference in consumer tasks like games.

If you’re interested in a 750 series SSD, feel free to check out our comprehensive review here

What size of SSD do you currently have and is it M.2, SATA or PCIe?

Thank you The Tech Report for providing us with this information.

Solid State Batteries “Could” last a Lifetime

Among the many annoyances of a tech lovers life which includes, overheating, constant patching, hacking and dropped connections, there is the term battery or lack of considering your average smartphone is dead by the end of each day. Don’t get me started on your run of the mill double A battery, it was fine for a Gameboy, until you had to unreel a long wire with a plug on the end to continue playing, but not for today’s hi-tech toys.

Hopefully, an evolution is on the horizon after researchers at MIT and Samsung have developed a new approach to one of the three basic components of batteries, which in this case is the electrolyte. The premise involves developing a solid electrolyte instead of the current liquid used in today’s most common rechargeables. Current batteries use a liquid organic solvent whose function is to transport charged particles from one of a battery’s two electrodes to the other during charging and discharging, this process has been responsible for the overheating and fires which have caused high-profile disruption.

Another advantage of a solid state electrolyte is the ability to limit degradation to near 0; therefore such batteries could last for “hundreds of thousands of cycles.” Researchers also state these batteries provide a 20 to 30 percent improvement in power density. This means the amount of power that can be stored in a given amount of space can be increased.

By reducing these factors, researchers are hopeful this technique will improve efficiency and waste of the common battery, which in turn will benefit consumers. On a side note, it will be interesting to note how you would put this into practice with the aim of analysing if these batteries would really last for hundreds of thousands of cycles. Indefinite lifetimes in theory, let’s see what a Galaxy S6 makes of that.

Thank you MIT for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of computerworld

A Next-Gen Battery for Mobile Devices Is in the Works at Google X Labs

Reports have indicated that a four person team inside Google X labs have switched from testing batteries back in 2013 to actually looking into technology for creating a new and improved version.

The group is said to be led by former Apple battery expert, Dr. Ramesh Bhardwaj, and formed back in 2012. One concept the group is said to be looking into is solid-state batteries, which are made by replacing the liquid chemicals with a solid current-inducing alternative. This is said to lead to smaller and safer batteries which can be produced in thin layers.

While the batteries are being designed for powering mobile devices, Google is said to also be looking into using the battery concept to power human body implants. Google is also not the only company to be working on futuristic batteries, but whoever comes up with the long-lasting, affordable, safer and smaller alternative to the current ones will be able to dominate the consumer market.

Thank you Phonearena for providing us with this information

Intel Announces Its Enterprise PCIe 2TB SSD Line Featuring 2800 MB/s Read Speeds

A new enterprise SSD line has been announced by Intel, using PCIe and NVM Express (or NVMe) in favour of the traditional SATA in order to gain significant performance boost.

The Intel SSD Data Center lineup contains three of the company’s series, the Intel SSD DC P3700 dedicated to write-intensive applications, the Intel SSD DC P3600 solution for mixed workloads and the Intel SSD DC P3500 with support for read-intensive operations. All series previously mention are said to be dedicated towards data centre operations.

In terms of specifications, the Intel SSD Data Center lineup boasts the latest PCIe 3.0 specification, having a high-performance PCIe interface controller architecture with NVMe and an average time between failures of 2,000,000 hours. The PCIe technology is also said to drastically reduce latency currently seen in HDD-based interfaces. More details on the SSD lineup can be viewed below.

Intel is said to deliver its Enterprise SSD lineup in two form factors, having one based on a hot-swappable 2.5-inch front panel architecture and the second based as an widely compatible add-in card, dedicated towards PCIe systems.

The company also guarantees 10 drive writes/day over the lifetime of the drive for the P3700 Series, 3 drive writes/day for the less-demanding P3600 Series and 0.3 drive writes/day for the read-intensive dedicated P3500 Series.

The Enterprise SSD lineup is said to be offered in 400 GB, 800 GB, 1.2 TB, 1.6 TB and 2 TB forms, having the lineup start at a price tag of $599.

Thank you Electronista and Tech Report for providing us with this information
Images courtesy of Tech Report