Sensible Soccer Reboot Launched on Kickstarter

Sensible Soccer’s arcade physics and frantic pace proved to be a magnificent formula which holds up remarkably well today. The game’s laughably unrealistic speed made each multiplayer match an action-packed encounter and released on the Atari ST, Amiga and PC. In the modern gaming industry, realism is at the heart of yearly football titles. However, the spiritual successor to Sensible Soccer has just been pitched on Kickstarter under the name, Sociable Soccer . Here’s a brief snippet about the project in the developer’s own words:

“An instantly playable football game for football fans all over the world, designed and directed by Jon Hare, the man behind Sensible World of Soccer, the best-selling football game of the 1990s.”

“The game will feature over 500 National, Club and Custom teams with over 10,000 researched player names. Team names, player names and kits used in game will be similar to the majority of popular titles on the market and fully editable.”

“Compete for over 30 single player trophies, and create DIY competitions for up to 8 players on a single machine. The game will be completed by the end of 2016 on PC, Steam, XBox One and Playstation 4.”

Please note, the current graphics are from a very early build and should be vastly improved as development progresses. The project requires £300,000 which is fairly reasonable and attainable given the huge popularity of Sensible Soccer. Although, it’s difficult to know if the golden era of arcade sports games have passed, and people just want to experience an authentic simulation.

Electronic Arts Might Have a Woman on the Cover of FIFA 16 This Year

Electronic Arts is working on the latest FIFA 16 title, as it is every year, but this year should be different. EA has looked into adding female players in the FIFA titles, but this year the company will finally do it. But this comes with another question, which is who will be featured on the regional covers of FIFA 16?

The timing for the big change couldn’t be perfect too. The recent success of the World Cup in Canada and the US team’s victory has fans hyped up for the title. Also, to choose the regional top players, EA has devised a voting system. We see a lot of candidates being proposed in France, Latin America, Mexico and the UK. However, surprisingly, we see only women candidates being proposed for the Australian cover. The only options chosen for Australian are Kyah Simon, Steph Catley and Katrina Gorry.

Last year, FIFA’s cover consisted of two players from the specific region, alongside all-star Lionel Messi. However, this year might be extremely different, given that women’s teams will also be featured. Will we see regional covers consisting of top male and female players appearing alongside? That would be the best option to consider, however EA is said to reveal their plans in the near future. Until then, what do you think? How should EA display this year’s cover?

Thank you Polygon for providing us with this information

Vanishing Spray Draws Attention During World Cup Free Kicks


If you’re watching the 2014 World Cup from Brazil, you’ve probably seen referees spray a white line on the field before free kicks.  The high-tech vanishing spray is being used to encircle the ball and a second line is placed ten yards away, to prevent players in the defensive wall from encroaching on the free kick.  The kicker also is unable to roll the ball forward a little bit before taking the kick.

The custom 9:15 Fairplay spray has received praise from players, and referees are still trying to sort out how to accurately spray it on the field.

Spraying the field has only been somewhat successful so far – defenders will initially line up behind the temporary spray, but will still move ahead of the line as the ball is kicked.  The mystery 9:15 Fairplay spray disappears after about one minute, and helps further legitimize free kicks.

Here is what Paul Rejer, Professional Referees Organization training and development manager said:

“We find the vanishing spray to be extremely useful and very effective in ensuring the defenders are 10 yards from the ball.  The spray makes it clear whether the ball is to be placed and where the defenders have to stand.  Since the use of spray we experience very few problems in achieving the… [minimum] distance.”

The spray is already used in Major League Soccer and in South American soccer tournaments.  FIFA has tested it during the Club World Cup and Under-20 World Cup – and it will be used in the Champions League starting next season.

Thank you CNN for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of Business Insider