G.Skill Announces Ripjaws DDR4-3000MHz 16GB 1.2V SO-DIMMs

DDR4 memory has come a long way since its introduction, but notebook and compact-system users haven’t been able to find as many choices when it comes to SO-DIMMs as the more traditional DIMM form factor. G.Skill is changing that and they’ve released yet another impressive module in this series. The new Ripjaws DDR4 modules can achieve 3000MHz at CL16 timings and they do so at a lower power consumption than other modules.

While DDR4 modules consume less power than DDR3 did, running them at such high speeds as 3000MHz usually requires modules to require 1.35V to perform at these speeds. But not these new Ripjaws modules, these modules will perform these speeds at just 1.2V and support the latest XMP 2.0 standard designed for 6th Gen Intel Core processors.

The new modules will be available in four different kits with either 8GB or 16GB modules and in packs with either one or two modules. Having SO-DIMMs that run with CL 16-18-18-43 timings at 3000MHz is already nice, but having them do so at just 1.2V is even more impressive. Adding that extra power and up to 32GB memory to compact systems is suddenly looking a lot easier.

Should your interest have been woken now, then there is some good news. You don’t have to wait very long to get the new G.Skill Ripjaws DDR4-3000MHz SO-DIMM modules as they will be available this month, April 20166, at authorized distributing partners. G.Skill did not reveal any pricing at this point, but we can assume that we’ll need to pay a fair price for such impressive and tiny memory modules.

Do you have any systems that would benefit from SO-DIMMs in this capacity, and if, would you upgrade to get that extra memory performance or are you happy with the more default 2133 to 2400MHz DDR4 memory speeds? Let us know in the comments.

Panasonic Develops New Solution for Full 8K Video Transmission

While the consumer world is starting to adjust and get up to date and 4K resolution monitors and TVs are starting to enter more and more homes around the world, Panasonic is already working on the next generation of 8K monitors. We have already seen a few large-screen monitors on display that could handle this high resolution, but it wasn’t really real. The 8K image was composed out of two 4K 60Hz images spliced into one.

The reason for this was the bandwidth limitation by the current cables and connectors, but Panasonic found the solution for this and presented the first single cable and connector solution for transmission of full-spec 8K video signals. For reference purpose, I can share that the official full-spec 8K resolution features 33 million pixels in a 7,680 by 4,320 pixel setup at 120 frames per second.

The new cable is a hybrid cable made of metal wire and plastic optical fiber and it overcomes the previous trouble of alignment. With detachable connectors like this on a cable, it is difficult to precisely align optical axes at the connection, which leads to poor connectivity and other defects. That has hampered the deployment of optical fiber cables in video transmission cables with detachable connectors, but that’s about to change.

Panasonic developed the new cable and connector type together with KAI Photonics Co., Ltd., a venture from Japan’s Keio University. The plastic optical fiber and its connection technology are using ballpoint-pen type interconnects and Panasonic further added their know-how on multi-level modulation of broadband signals to achieve a transmission bandwidth that exceeds 100 Gbps with a single cable. That should be plenty even for 8K 120Hz setups.

Professor Yasuhiro Koike of the Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, commented: “I am delighted that Panasonic successfully developed a prototype cable for transmitting 8K images based on ‘plastic optical fiber and its connection technology using ballpoint-pen type interconnect,’ which was developed by Keio University. We would like to further cooperate with Panasonic to respond to the variety of needs for audiovisual transmission.”

Naturally this is intended for corporate usage for now, but what starts in the corporate world usually makes it to the consumer market sooner or later. For now, we need the 4K format to take off with more available content.

Plague Inc. To Receive Multiplayer In Update

You lean back, the leather chair supporting you as you spin and maliciously stroke your cat with a sinister laugh that would make Dr Evil proud. We’ve all imagined our life as the hero of the story, James Bond or countless others, but some of us (myself included) will admit that we’ve also imagined what it would be like sitting in the chair and plotting to take over the world. Plague Inc works with that feeling, what if you were the bad guy, or in this game’s case it’s all about the diseases that you are trying to spread. Soon though you could see yourself racing against your friends to see who can wipe out humanity first.

On December 1st Plague Inc: Evolved will enable Vs. mode, in which not only do you have to develop a disease to take over the world, constantly battling and creating new ways to prevent being cured but you will have to watch out, your friends will also be looking to wipe you out.

Of course, what’s a new update without new abilities? Why not send an unscheduled plane full of infected to your friends country, or how about using genetic exposure to help what’s survivors try to fight off your opponents disease?

Sometimes being bad is just too good.

Mushkin Redline and Blackline Ridgeback DDR4 Memory Now Available

Mushkin originally unveiled their DDR4 Ridgeback memory modules in the Blackline and Redline versions back at CES 2015 and now they’ve finally been released to the market and are available. The new modules are optimized for both the Intel X99 platform as well as the just released Skylake.

The Ridgeback heatsink is cut from aircraft-grade anodized aluminium that improves the heat dissipation that can give the user that extra bit of headroom or stability. The DDR4 modules are loaded with XMP 2.0 profiles for easy setup and reliable overclocking.

Muskin’s memory modules are built with hand-screened DRAM and undergo rigorous testing in the US-based facilities before leaving on route to shops and distributors before finally arriving in your home.

The new modules are currently available as single modules, dual kits, and four-piece kits with 8GB modules. The speed ranges from 2133MHz to 2400MHz with 12-12-12-35 and 15-15-15-35 timings. More versions with different capacities, module amount, and speeds are bound to come later on.

Both the red and black heat spreaders look so great that it’s almost a shame that Mushkin didn’t go for a black PCB on these modules. It could have given them that little bit of extra wow effect, but on the other hand, you won’t see much of it once they are plugged into your motherboard.

Games Prices In Europe Set To Be Unified

Europe is looking towards a more technological environment, where companies and countries can operate knowing that there is a standard across the board for everything that may impact that their work. This could soon be the same for games as well thanks to the European Commission.

The Digital Single Market outlines a proposal for a fairer system when it comes to game pricing in the EU. Game prices fluctuate depending on where you buy them from, with companies like GoG trying to level this through their credit system.

Please note that this only applies to digital copies of games, but would be across the board. This means that be it from Xbox Live, PSN, Steam or another digital distributor, you would be asked to pay the same price throughout all EU territories.

The digital single market was first introduced in May 2015 and looks to bring about uniform pricing in 2016. This is alongside a broadband standard that would see 30MBPS internet standard for all citizens, with 50% of European households having 100MBPS internet by 2020.

With all these measures to help not only gamers but everyone in the European union, we could shortly see better internet connections and fairer prices for digital content. How can that be a bad thing?

Thank you European Commission for the information.

Image courtesy of Wikipedia.

AMD’s Official Roadmaps Reveals the Company’s Plans for the next 5 Years

AMD has revealed what the company plans to do with its GPUs and CPUs in the next 5 years at the PC Cluster Consortium event in Osaka Japan, where AMD’s Junji Hayashi revealed the company’s roadmap.

During the event, AMD has focused on its graphics IP and the products that involved it, including discrete Radeon graphics cards and Radeon powered Accelerated Processing Units. There have been talks about AMD’s upcoming K12 ARM as well as the x86 Zen CPU core, including a strategy of how the company plans to introduce both x86 and ARM powered SOCs to the market in a pin for pin compatible platform code-named SkyBridge.

It is said that both CPUs are 64-bit capable parts coming in a 14nm FinFET ‘shell’, but one is based on the ARMv8 architecture while the other is based on the more traditional x86 AMD64 architecture, having them target the server, embedded, semi-custom and client markets.

AMD has also talked about “many threads” revealing that the K12 will come with Simultaneous Multi-Threading (SMT) technology in contrast to the company’s Clustered Multi-Thread (CMT) technology we are able to see in the Bulldozer family. SMT essentially takes advantage of the various resources in the core which are underutilized and dedicate to an additional, slower, execution thread for added throughput. In contrast, CMT is looking for opportunities to share resources between two different CPU cores, instead of doing it inside a single CPU core.

Hayashi also revealed AMD’s GPU roadmap, which reveals that the company is employing a two-year cadence to updating its GPU architecture inside APUs. It looks like the company will add Accelerated Processing Units with updated GPU architectures once every two years. The roadmap also reveals that AMD plans to introduce what it described as a High Performance Computing APU which carries a 200 – 300 watts TDP, having the company stating that the APU in question will excel in HPC applications.

AMD apparently did not attempt to go with newer APUs in the future because it was not viable in terms of memory bandwidth. Instead, the company’s stacked High Bandwidth Memory will be used as an alternative, making the design extremely effective. The second generation of HBM is said to be 9 times faster than GDDR5 memory and 128 times faster than DDR3 memory.

The company has not revealed any code names for the GPU architectures, but a previous leak pointed out that the architecture will debut on 16nm FinFET and will be code-named Arctic Islands. More specific details about AMD’s products will be revealed in May at the Financial Analyst Day event.

Thank you WCCF for providing us with this information