Amazon Payments Global Partner Program to Take on Paypal

Amazon is a popular platform for many things, with their websites offering everything from the kindle to mass ordering your pets favourite type of food. With recent steps in the video game market, courtesy of Lumberyard and even sharing educational materials for schools, the company look like it will stop anytime soon with the revelation of the new Payments Global Partner Program.

If this sounds familiar it’s because you probably already use PayPal or something similar, but Amazon’s Payments Global Partner Program looks to go head to head by offering you the same security you get with your amazon account when paying for products on hundreds of other sites.

Amazon states that all the merchants using the new system will be using the same fraud detection technology that Amazon already uses, meaning if you trusted Amazon you can trust them. If this wasn’t enough the temptation, companies are helped by its quick integration and inline basket, meaning no more tedious programming or changing sites to add in your bank details.

It should be noted though that sites using the new system will have access to customers “name and email addresses so you can personalise their on-site experience”, while not a huge issue some people would want reassurances that an easy to opt-in program had some security regarding their details.

GreenManGaming Hit With Battlefront Launch Day Supply Issues

GreenManGaming’s reputation has been under fire of late as recent reports suggested the company acquired game codes from unauthorized sources. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean the keys are stolen, it’s just they don’t have direct support from Activision and Ubisoft. The huge amount of CD key sites and staggeringly low pre-order discounts are an enticing proposition. Furthermore, in most cases, consumers receive their keys on launch and download games in a swift manner via Steam, Origin or UPlay.

However, it appears a large number of customers haven’t received Star Wars: Battlefront after pre-ordering from GreenManGaming some time ago. Below is just a brief snippet of the user complaints on the site’s official Facebook page:

It’s difficult to deduce how many customers actually received their Battlefront code, but initial reports don’t look promising. GreenManGaming has decided to offer a 30% off voucher for those affected but I doubt this will be enough to keep people happy. Consumers often pre-order to become involved in launch day discussions and sense the excitement. Unfortunately, many people saved up their hard-earned cash to get the game on day one.

This entire situation applies further pressure on GreenManGaming and raises questions about their suppliers. The company’s customer service is usually quite good, so I’m surprised to see reports of customers being told their order couldn’t be fulfiled due to a stock shortage. Surely, GreenManGaming knew about the stock shortages and should have informed customers about the problem in advance. Perhaps, they hoped to receive a last minute shipment. Whatever the case, this isn’t going to help GreenManGaming’s reputation and if negative publicly continues, people will no longer be prepared to pay the extra compared to grey key resellers.

Amazon is Suing 1114 ‘Fake Reviewers’

Amazon has filed a lawsuit in Seattle, Washington to tackle a number of “false, misleading and inauthentic” reviews. The reviews in question are paid for by sellers to make their products look more appetizing. According to Amazon, the 1,114 defendants, referred to as “John Does” provides a false review service for as little as $5 (£3.24) on the website Fiverr.com, Once payment has been made, products will receive fake 5 star ratings.

Clearly, this skews the genuine reception of each product and hurts the consumer. As a result, Amazon has made this their top priority and said:

“While small in number, these reviews can significantly undermine the trust that consumers and the vast majority of sellers and manufacturers place in Amazon, which in turn tarnishes Amazon’s brand,”

“Amazon is bringing this action to protect its customers from this misconduct, by stopping defendants and uprooting the ecosystem in which they participate,”

This kind of fraudulent activity could increase the sales of poor value products, and deceive customers. Therefore, once the item arrives and is of a disappointing quality, Amazon has to deal with the returns process. This can be a costly endeavor and also discourages people from purchasing items in the near future.

Have you encountered any problems when buying products from Amazon sellers?

30 Days Returns Now Law In The UK

We’ve all had it before, you’ve gone out and brought something new, something nice and shiny and you get it home, open the package like a child at Christmas and when you go to use it, you find it won’t work. Sometimes it takes a little longer, like that MP3 player you had which worked for about a week and then one day just stopped turning on. How about that phone screen which turned black after two weeks and yet still rings? We have even come across that with video games, when you buy that bit of software and then suddenly half way through the first level you find that it’s taken up all your RAM and your computer is slower than your calculator? Now you don’t have to worry about that, at least not for the first 30 days.

In the UK, on the 1st of October 2015, the Consumer Rights Act came into effect. This is the first time that your rights, or at least those outlining digital content, have been set in law. Previously the best you had was that you were entitled to a refund within a “reasonable time”, if it takes you a week to get around to playing a game and they said you should have played it on the first day, you were in trouble. Now you have one month to claim, and if a repair or replacement is impossible you are entitled to a refund. The refund must, I repeat MUST, arrive within 14 days of the acknowledgement of the claim by the retailer.

What about that game you download only to find it has come with a bunch of hidden bonus features, and not of the good kind. Well if their software has infected your PC with viruses, you could be liable for compensation (cue the automated phone calls).

Have you ever had to request a refund for a fault game? How about a piece of technology that broke just before/after the warrenty period ended?

Thank you Independent for the information.

Thank you Pc Gamer for the image.

A 4Chan Post Sold For $90,900 on eBay… Wait, What?

Everyone can sell literally anything on eBay nowadays. For example, this eBay seller has auctioned a simple 4Chan post and expected to get a lot of money for it.

The really interesting part is that the user actually made a fortune off the post. It is said that Artnet originally caught the post, a vendor known as “Artwork by Anonymous”, who turned the simple Chan post into a $90,900 masterpiece.

The post originally started at $500, which is still a lot of money for a common thing you find on the internet, only to end at the above mentioned bid price. Also, the lucky bidder is said to enjoy free expedite shipping for the product at hand.

Re/Code mentions that the bid reached the five digit count in just 36 hours, confirming that the auction is fake since it is pretty easy to inflate an eBay listing. Even so, people can just bid and not pay for it, a common practice found on the site.

Anyone who has missed the first auction can now enjoy a second listing of the Chan post, which seems to have a starting price of $500 as well. As for the eBay seller, it seems that art doesn’t have to be unique in order to get a heap of money out of it.

Thank you Gizmodo for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Gizmodo