Gmail Says Use of Encrypted Emails Has Risen 25%

We use email every day, be it sending them for work or personal reasons or getting a thousand and one emails advertising everything from something you are interested in helping a foreign prince distribute their wealth. One way that you can be protected when sending emails is to send encrypted emails, something which has risen in use by 25% for Gmail users.

What caused this spur of encrypted emails? Google stated last year that they would start flagging up emails which were unencrypted, warning users which providers and emails were being sent from services that supported TLS encryption. This change came into effect in February this year, the end result of which was the 25% increase in encrypted emails that Gmail has reported in the last month.

Google isn’t acting alone on this, with Comcast, Microsoft, Yahoo and other companies in the industry looking to create SMTP, a new standard that could be used to help protect emails from man-in-the-middle attacks.

Combining all these with their recent push on security updates in Chrome and Android, including their use of two-factor authentication encryption and warning people about state-sponsored attacks on accounts, it’s becoming more and more clear that even in the digital world, companies want your private information to remain private.

ASUSTOR NAS Adds Comprehensive Search App QuikFynd

ASUSTOR’s latest NAS feature could be one of the most useful features yet to be added, but it does come with a few things that you should pay attention to before you get too excited. The new feature is called QuikFynd and while it sounds like a frying pan from IKEA, it is an awesome search feature for your NAS.

The first thing that might come between you and the usage of QuikFynd is that it is limited to the x86 based models. This is however a logic limitation as it is a feature that requires some proper performance in order to deliver a workable experience. Also, most ASUSTOR NAS are X86 based, so users of ASUSTOR 2, 3, 6, 31, 50, 51,61, 62, 70 series devices combined with the latest ADM 2.5.2 version and onwards can now find the comprehensive search app QuikFynd in their App Central.

“With data become digitized in exponential amounts, businesses and individual users alike, all face the problematic task of accurately searching for items from amongst thousands of files and terabytes of data. QuikFynd provides a convenient search solution, allowing users to quickly search for target files stored on their NAS according to content, file name or tags.”

After installation, users can open the dedicated interface from the ADM desktop and begin searching or use one of the mobile apps that also should be available now. You have the full privacy of your files as everything is stored on your own server at home.

There is one more thing with ASUSTOR’s QuikFynd that you should pay attention to. There are two different versions of this feature, a Lite version that is free or a Pro version that you’ll need to pay for. Both versions offer search by names and meta-data tags, streaming over local networks, search history, recent items, access from a browser, and access from mobile apps. The Pro version also allows for full-text search, location details from GPS tags, search text within images, stream to remote devices, and result-highlighting.

ASUSTOR is letting you try the Pro version for 3-months without costs, but after that, you’ll have to pay either $20 for a year’s subscription or $60 for a lifetime subscription to the QuikFynd Pro features. As previously mentioned, the apps can be found through your App Central within the ADM and you can find all the details and subscribe on the official website.

Comodo Fixes Issue Which Resulted In Banned Certificates

Have you ever noticed that padlock symbol in your address bar when you go on a website, such as eBay or your emails? These symbols actually mean something, they mean that the website has been verified by an SSL certificate, these are provided by an external company and are designed to let you know that your websites are safe and secure. So can you imagine what that means when bad certificates are issued?

Comodo is one of the companies that provide online certificates and has had to fix just that problem when they released a fix for a bug which issued several certificates after the rules for providing those certificates changed. In a post on their forum, Rob Stradling, Comodo’s senior research and development scientist, posted that eight certificates were issued but didn’t end the post there.

Stradling then went on to state that Comodo may not be the only company to have this problem,

We found non-compliant certificates issused by quite a number of other CAs, but I’ll document these in another post.

With the fix released only two hours after they discovered the bug, the hope is that the padlock can stay a symbol of security and safety online.

New Firefox Testing Feature Warns Of Insecure Website Password Submission

Consumers are exposed to a myriad of cyber threats which are intent upon harvesting as much information as possible, from bogus emails offering state cash refunds to spoofed pages which purport to be from a genuine vendors, but are in fact aiming to collect sensitive consumer details. Well known and popular browser Mozilla Firefox have recognised the importance of alerting consumers to the security of password submission by offering a simple yet important safeguard within the latest Firefox Nightly build.

The security measure in question is in the form of a faded crossed out padlock icon within the address bar of the browser, thankfully it’s more useful than simply a new icon. The aim of this new feature is to warn consumers if a password field is not submitted over HTTPS and thus regarded as insecure. If a consumer clicks on the icon it will provide further details as to why a particular site is considered insecure, below is an image to convey the change. This feature is currently “only in testing as part of Firefox 44 Nightly”.

This new yet simple feature is a good way of informing consumers as to the risks of submitting a password over an insecure method, cyber security is a hot topic and the more every individual knows the better. It will be interesting to note the rollout timescale of this feature once Firefox confirms it for its finished builds. On a side note, let’s hope consumers actually update their browsers in order to benefit from the latest security fixes, I bet many a reader knows someone who is running a version of Firefox that is at least 10 versions behind that of the currently available.

Image courtesy of technodyan

Giada Announces GT400 All-round MicroServer

Micro Servers are growing in popularity along with any other device that is shrinking in size while maintaining the performance power of the larger siblings, and it is no surprise. A great feature set, low power consumption, and a small footprint make them an optimal choice for enthusiasts as well as small and medium businesses. Giada announced their newest take on this market and it is called the GT400 MicroServer.

Giada’s GT400 MicroServer is a 4-bay storage system and it would be perfect for NAS systems as well as general Windows and Linux OS uses. It is built for low power consumption and 24/7 reliability and it supports RAID 0, 1, 5, and 10 modes for the installed drives.

 

The system is very power efficient thanks to the Intel Celeron 1037U dual-core processor with an operating frequency of up to 1.8GHz while it only consumes a mere 17W at max. And the Celeron is great at file tasks, quite a lot better than the Atom for example, making it a great choice. The built-in power supply can deliver up to 180 Watts, which should be more than sufficient no matter what drives you install. The chipset used is the Intel HM77

Connectivity is provided through dual Gigabit Ethernet, both Intel-powered. One is a 210AT and the other is an 82579LM. USB 3.0, USB 2.0, D-Sub VGA, and audio out connections are available on the rear while the front features a USB 3.0 port with hardware copy button.

 

The four drive bays are hot-swappable and lockable for security purposes and prevent accidental ejection. The system itself is cooled by a 75mm fan that is placed on the rear of the unit. The available LEDs include one for each drive, one for each LAN port, one for USB, one for Status and one for Power. A system buzzer is also included, making it a complete package for almost any scenario.

The GT400 is compatible with both Windows and Linux systems, allowing you to use the one that is best for your setup. Free NAS systems such as OpenMediaVault and FreeNAS would be the perfect choice for prosumers while SMB users most likely will go with a custom Linux or Windows Server version.

You can equip the Giada GT400 with up to two SO-DIMM DDR3 modules, but Giada didn’t specify a maximum amount. So, 16GB in two 8GB modules should work without trouble on this chipset and CPU. The GT400 also features an internal m-SATA SSD port for your system partition.

Giada also applied its own designed and patented JAHC technology in the GT400. JAHC, Active Hardware Control Technology, provides built-in capabilities for unattended operations such as auto power on when connected to power, or a scheduled power on/off.

The GT400 also has an optional enterprise-class wireless router function. With this feature, the server is equipped with an enterprise-class main control chip and 4 external detachable antennas. In addition to the 2.4GHz/5GHz dual-frequency technology, its maximum wireless transmission rate reaches up to 600Mbps. The professional and enhanced low-noise amplifier increase the wireless performance with better signal strength, penetration and stability performance.

Green Dispensing Malware to ATM Machines

A downside of technical innovation lies in the unfortunate ability to hack devices with the aim of stealing information and scamming consumers out of their savings. ATM’s are not immune to this threat and a new breed of malware has the ability to allow an attacker the option to drain the ATM’s cash vault before erasing the evidence.

The malware in question is coined “Green Dispenser” and it implements an out of service message on the ATM, but, all is not well as attackers with access to the correct pin codes can then drain the ATM’s cash vault and erase Green Dispenser using a deep delete process, leaving little if any trace of how the ATM was robbed. Let’s take a look at the deployment and operation process of this greedy piece of malware.

Deployment and Operation

The only way this malware can be installed is via physical access to the machine, therefore it is not possible to walk up to an ATM which is situated in a shop or sunk into a bank wall and attempt to install such code, therefore this raises the option of a compromised employee with access to said machines. Green Dispenser has the ability to target “ATM hardware from multiple vendors using the XFS standard. It achieves this by querying for peripheral names from the registry hive before defaulting to hardcoded peripheral names”.

An operational functionality in the coded run date is “2015” with the month being earlier than September. This suggests to analysts that Green Dispenser was employed in a limited operation and designed to deactivate itself to avoid detection. A second layer which the attackers have implemented with the aim of hiding their activities lies in the authentication using a hardcoded pin which is then followed by a second pin which this time is dynamic.

It is believed the attacker in question derives this second PIN from a QR code which is displayed on the screen of the infected ATM, which is then read by an application that can be scanned onto a smart phone. Think of this as similar to logging into your favourite website, you input in a password before using a second two factor authentication method to unlock your account, by implementing this method it makes it more secure so that only the person in question can use the malware, provided they have the correct authentication.

Once the malware is run it attempts to verify if the month is earlier than September and the current year is 2015, if it finds the year to be say 2014, it simply shuts down. If the details are correct, Green Dispenser “creates a second desktop environment on the ATM called “dDispW” and creates a window in the second desktop called “Dispenser”. This is with the aim of overlaying an “Out Of Order” message within the ATM screen; it is worth noting that the message has appeared in Spanish as well as English.

Below is the QR code screenshot, “If the dispense cash option is selected, Green Dispenser attempts to query the registry location “HKEY_USERS\ .DEFAULT\XFS\LOGICAL_SERVICES\class=CDM” to find the peripheral name for the cash dispenser. If not found, it defaults to “CurrencyDispener1” which is the cash dispenser peripheral name on specific ATMs. It then makes a call to WFSExecute with the command set to “WFS_CMD_CDM_DISPENSE” and a timeout of 12000 to dispense cash”.

As you can see, it’s a complex piece of malware which aims to offer the option to take as much money as you would like, which is good, (Disclaimer – please don’t take as much money as you want, it may sound good but it is not) Manufactures and banks would need to work together to counteract these threats with updated modern security upgrades, if not, expect these methods to become a standard in attacks against machines.

Thank you proofpoint for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of hacer

Fallout’s Vaults Are Real!

Vivos luxury bunkers are just as awesome as they sound; they are the closest to the Fallout vaults you can get! The vaults are carved out of a mountain in Germany, measuring a whopping two-hundred and fifty thousand square feet. The mountain houses 80 apartments in total.

The Vivos project began in 2007 when Vicino decided to act upon a “message from above” that he received around 30 years ago. His theory is that the Atlantic will be struck by an asteroid on September the 23rd, so best get your name down quick!

The shelters are prepared for nuclear war, electromagnetic pulses and more, you will also be picked up in a private jet providing your application is successful. However, Vicino has only accepted the super wealthy into the vaults, people with royal heritage and on the Forbes rich list have already signed up. You do have a chance if you have a specific skill, mind. Vicino is offering discounts to people with medical, military and security skills.

They have enough food and supplies for three years and are seriously secure. The Doors are two foot thick, nuclear blast-proof, weigh 100 tonnes and take one hour to open by hydraulics and 24 hours to open by hand crank, so they’re certainly nice and safe!

I wonder if you have to take the G.O.A.T. test?

Thank you to PCGamesN for providing us with this information

SSL Bug Lets People Impersonate Anyone

So you’re browsing online, through Facebook, Ebay and even your bank and you notice that padlock at the start of your address bar. You see that symbol and you think, that means I’m secure. I’m safe and I can browse and send information without a worry. Seems like that might be a mistake according to a new bug report.

SSL is the system in which websites can be verified, this means you can be certain that the website you’re sending information to is actually the website you want and not someone pretending. It also means that you have to use a standard of encryption when communicating information across the web. OpenSSL is a standard used by a variety of websites in order to offer some security and reassurance to its users, and sadly is publicly available meaning that users are free to view and edit the code as they see fit.

From the log that’s available it appears that the code responsible for the problem was added all the way back in January, however, it was only released to the publicly used version last month. With this problem, it would be possible for fake websites to change and “appear” as if they were the legitimate version and due to how the system works, fake websites would also be able to provide “certificates” for other websites.

While it was in the public version it didn’t make its way into the mainstream versions used by a lot of people, meaning that it has since been removed and the damage limited (if there is any at all). This is in contrast to the Heartbleed virus that resided in OpenSSL for almost two whole years before being discovered.

Thank you ArsTechnica for the information.

Image courtesy of the BBC.

Logjam Can Hijack Your HTTPS Connections

There are a lot of techniques involving malware, trojans or other sort of attacks, but this one seems to affect the common and widely used HTTPS protocol, making it more ‘nasty’ than the rest. Logjam is a cryptographic attack that targets the Diffie-Hellman key exchange in HTTPS, SSH, SMTPS and other sort of negotiation protocols used by the server and browser.

So why is it so important for us to know about? It’s simple. The technique uses a man-in-the-middle approach to break the 512-bit encryption and make it readable. An academic team said that it was even able to beat a 768-bit encryption, but word is that even a 1024-bit encryption can be taken down with enough effort. What this means is that hackers using the latter technique can easily spy on the top 1 million HTTPS domains and even 66% of VPN servers.

Security specialists say that users should upgrade their browsers to the latest version and server owners should disable support for external cypher suites that generate 2048-bit Diffie-Hellman group along with updating to the latest OpenSSH. They say that the technique at hand can even be used by government agencies to easily spy on your web traffic, so hackers aren’t your only concern.

So, are you keeping everything up to date?

Thank you macnn for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of PSDGraphics

Windows 10 Will Make Secure Boot Optional

Microsoft launched the secure boot function together with Windows 8, a thing the open source software association and many users weren’t happy about. Manufacturers had to enable this mandatory in order to get the “Designed for Windows 8” certification and logo. This looks set to change now as the Windows 10 requirements were released during the WinHEC conference held in Shenzhen. It is now optional whether manufacturers want to enable it for Windows 10 desktops, changing from the previous mandatory state.

Secure boot in itself is a great feature, preventing rootkits and rogue boot loaders to get hold of your system. But the drawback is that you can’t dual-boot Windows 8 and Linux, the mechanism prevents this.

There is still some time until Windows 10 is launched, so this might change again. But if it sticks, it could mean a lot less hassle to get dual-booting systems to run and also fits with Microsofts current scheme for more openness and cross-platform functionality.

Thanks to CNbeta for providing us with this information

Google Working on New VPN Service for Open WiFi Networks

Android 5.1 appears to come with a new network security feature, as reported by Pocketables. They have found a new VPN feature on Google’s latest Android build called Google Connectivity Services, which can be found in Settings > Apps > All and by scrolling down, users can see it under the latter mentioned name.

It seems to be a bit tricky to launch the app, having to launch it as an activity rather than a fully fledged Android app. The activity is named “com.google.android.apps.gcs/com.google.android.apps.gcs.WifiAssistantOptInActivity” and can be launched with the help of QuickShorcutMaker, an app which can be downloaded for free from the Google Play Store.

Once you place the Google Connectivity Service on the screen and launch it, users are greeted by popup message stating the following: “To help protect you on open Wi-Fi networks, your data will be transmitted securely through a Google VPN.”

The “Learn More” button will take users to the Google support page, also accessible from here, while the “Got It” button takes the users to the standard VPN connection request screen.

However, the test was not successful, having attempted to connect through open WiFi networks, secure WiFi networks and even LTE with no avail. It is still unclear if and when Google will launch this feature, whether it will be open for everyone or will it be discontinued. What we do know is that Google is at least making an effort to bring some VPN services to its latest Android OS.

Thank you Pocketables for providing us with this information

Self-Cleaning & Self-Powered Smart Keyboard Identifies Its User

Passwords are an easy and convenient way to prevent unauthorised access to our data, but it might not be the best as many recent stories have shown us. Researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and Beijing University of Technology have now created a new smart keyboard to improve on this flaw.

The smart keyboard can be used as any other keyboard, but it does a lot more. It is self-powered simply by collecting the energy used by the user when pressing the buttons to type and it also repels dust and dirt through the generation of a micro-current.

The really awesome feature is that it can detect who is typing and lock out unauthorized access. By measuring not only the typing speed, but also the pressure applied and typing pattern, it knows if you’re authorized. Even knowing a password to login won’t help you anymore as the keyboard will lock you out of the system. It will even store the data entered by the unauthorized user for you to evaluate when he’s running for the hills.

Thanks to cnBeta for providing us with this information

PNY Announces New SPYRUS Co-Branded Encrypting and Bootable Windows To Go Drives

PNY announced its entry into the high assurance encrypting USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 data storage and bootable drives market with new PNY cobranded Secured By SPYRUS drives. The PocketVault P-3X and PocketVault P-384 encrypting USB drives are resistant to the BadUSB attacks that otherwise is an unpatched problem.

“PNY is proud to partner with SPYRUS to manufacture and distribute the SPYRUS USB product lines specifically engineered to meet the security needs of the Enterprise and Government marketplace,” said Bob Stone, SVP of Operations for PNY. “Our extensive USA manufacturing and support facilities for flashbased products in Parsippany, New Jersey, can meet the global demand forecasted for high security USB 2.0 and 3.0 devices.”

PocketVault P-3X combines USB 3.0 performance and SSD NAND for ultra-fast performance. Designed to meet FIPS 140-2 Level 2 and Level 3 specifications, the P-3X features a ruggedized extruded aluminum case and a unique embedded hardware security module to support digital signature applications. PocketVault P-384 is a USB 2.0 drive that stores your data in an encrypted partition on its internal microSD card. Both drives use the latest XTS-AES 256-bit full disk encryption instead of the older AES-CBC encryption.

PNY is also entering the Hardware-encrypted Secure Portable Workplace and Bitlocker encrypted Portable Workplace family from SPYRUS. These are Microsoft-certified Windows-To-Go drives that securely boot your custom Windows 8 or 8.1 securely even when booted from untrusted computers.

Thanks to PNY for providing us with this information

BlackBerry Working With Boeing on ‘Black Phone’ That Runs Android

BlackBerry has said that it is supporting Boeing with the development of its Boeing Black Phone – a highly secure smartphone intended to be used by government and security service officials.

BlackBerry CEO John Chen said that the company would be working with Boeing during their Friday earnings call, saying that “Boeing is collaborating with BlackBerry to provide a secure mobile solution for Android devices utilizing our BES 12 platform.” He added “That, by the way, is all they allow me to say” alluding to the device’s intended high securty.

Details concerning the device are limited, with Boeing’s website offering only that it runs on Android and a number of encryption features.

  • Android Operating System: Convenient smartphone for Android usage

  • Disk Encryption: Encrypted storage for sensitive data

  • Hardware Root of Trust: Ensures software authenticity

  • Hardware Crypto Engine: Protects stored and transmitted data

  • Embedded Secure Components: Enables trusted operations

  • Trusted Platform Modules: Provides secure key storage

  • Secure Boot: Maintains device image integrity

  • Hardware Modularity: Endless modularity capabilities

Source: Gizmodo

Facebook Facial Recognition Software Proven to be More Accurate than FBI Counterpart

There has been a lot of debating when it comes to facial recognition, having the FBI scare people off with its Next Generation Identification project and its intention to gather millions of photos in a federal database.

However, the FBI’s system has been proven to be inaccurate despite the EFF’s concern regarding people’s privacy and pointing out the fact that innocent people might end up in the ‘pool’ of photos. It is said that the NGI returns a ranked list of 50 possibilities, giving only a 85 percent chance of returning the suspect’s name in the list. This means that one in several suspects might slip away from the analysis and nobody can do anything about it.

Comparing the FBI’s project to Facebook’s DeepFace system revealed at the IEEE Computer Vision conference could make the law enforcement agency look like little kids playing with toy blocks. It is said that DeepFace can return a match in two pictures with a 97 percent accuracy, similar to having a human witnessing a suspect. Nonetheless, both the social media giant and the authorities are still far away from true facial-recognition capabilities.

Shahar Belkin, CTO of FST Biometrics, describes that for a facial recognition software to work, it currently needs a person to stare into a camera at an offset of 15 degrees at most off the center axis. Even so, the actual camera or photograph needs to present a high density of pixels and resolution, namely to be a high-quality picture. This is why Belkin states that we are still far away from actual face-recognition software that works. Street cameras and even surveillance cameras are not made for facial-recognition technology due to their poor image quality and angle.

This does not mean that your privacy is secure though. Facebook may win in facial recognition, but it does however present an opportunity which the FBI could take advantage of. While the law enforcement agency cannot provide a fully working facial recognition system just yet, it can still drag the social media giant into court orders to gain access to its database. It is just a matter of time until a fully working facial recognition system will emerge.

Thank you The Verge for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of The Verge

SanDisk Extreme PRO 128GB USB3.0 Flash Drive Review

Introduction


Since their launch, USB3.0 flash drives have been one of those items that any avid enthusiast has had to have in their portfolio of tech gadgets, but when we get down to the simple facts of what they have to offer over any other USB based flash drive, 99% of the time I would guarantee that it’s the higher capacity and read speeds that make them attractive. When we look at the bigger picture, it is easy to see why these two details make these flash drives desirable. With the amount of data that we are wanting to move around growing exponentially, being able to move large volumes of data in one hit and being able to transfer content to and from the drive quickly is key. There is though one problem that the vast majority of these drives have in common and that is all-round read performance. Being able to say you’ve got fast sequential speeds is one thing, but when we move down the ladder to the smaller file sizes, we soon start to see things not looking so great – especially when compared to the read performance figures that are available.

True to form there is always one manufacturer that sees this weakness in the market and ventures on to resolve the problem with a new class of drive and this is exactly what SanDisk has aimed to do with the Extreme PRO USB3.0 flash drive. Although we don’t know exactly which NAND in particular has been used, going by the specs we could make a fair bet that its of a synchronous variety and guaging by the sixe of the drive there could easily be two NAND packages alongside the drives controller. That said though, all of this is packed into an aluminium and black plastic body and with read and write speeds of 260MB/s and 240MB/s respectively on offer, we are touching on the performance that SATAII SSDs have to give. Sounds good doesn’t it? Boasting up to 60x the performance of USB2.0 flash drives is a big thing to shout about so it’s all down to those all important performance results to make or break SanDisk’s claims that this is truly an Extreme performing drive.


On the front of the matte black box we find a typical SanDisk layout with the drive on full view the model name and some key performance figures on display alongside the capacity. SanDisk have no need to use flashy graphics all over their packaging, instead preferring to use a top the point design with a small amount of flare with the product name printed in a gold like colour.

Kingston DataTraveller Locker+ G3 & HyperX 1TB Flash Drive On Show At Post-CES Event

Whilst we have seen a lot from Kingston at this years Consumer Electronics Show, but this is not to say that they have shown us everything that they have to offer. Part of the reason why we see one or two things crop up just after CES comes down to development. If Kingston were to put everything together and launch it all at the same time, then there is a high chance that something will get missed out or not given as much exposure as something that is a little more revolutionary or performance pushing. This is the reason why only a few weeks after one of the years biggest tech shows Kingston are holding a smaller, more select event where they can focus their attention one a small group of products that they want to give a small push into the market and with the number of products more concentrated, the exposure that they will get from these is more defined as opposed to being lost in a stand or suite overview for example.

One of the few products that they have got on show, and the one that this mini-event is mainly pushing out is the all new DataTraveller Locker+ G3. Now whilst we have seen a wide range of drives come on to the market under both the DataTraveller name and also having the G3 tag, the Locker+ is a drive that is a little more unique with a feature that not too many drives tend to have on the market; namely encrypted storage.

Now when we think about data encryption and storage, people tend to think about the internet and systems that hold personal information about ourselves, but on the consumer end of the market, there is still the demand for secure storage to ensure that data and information cannot fall into the wrong hands. Flash drives are one of the more common pieces of consumer hardware that we tend to misplace or lose entirely and if this drive holds valuable data, either personal or in relation to a business, there is the slight potential that the damages could be far greater than expected. As a result this is the whole reason why we are seeing encrypted drives come onto the market.

To join this growing market of secure flash drives, Kingston are unveiling the new and improved DataTraveler Locker+ Generation 3 drive. With capacities ranging from 8GB through to 64GB and offering read and write speeds of up to 135MB/s and 40MB/s respectively, the thrid generation drives offer better capacities and faster speeds over the generation two secure drives that fall under the DataTraveler range. With faster speeds on offer, the new drive boasts a USB3.0 port and a sleek, rugged feeling all-metal housing with a massive 5-year warranty. Data encryption is made possible through an installation-free interface that runs directly from the drive, meaning wherever you go, you’ll always have access to your data when you need it and the security when you need it the most.

The Locker+ G3 is available now and with prices starting at around £10 for the 8GB model, ranging up to around £45 for the 64GB drive, the drives are not only desirable, but also affordable as well. Watch closely on eTeknix as will have a review of this drive coming up very soon.

Whilst the Locker+ G3 was the the key product to see, there is one drive that Kingston have been bragging about for a number of months now and one that has dropped the jaws of many enthusiasts and pro-sumers around the world. This is of course the massive 1TB capacity that is packed into the HyperX Predator USB3.0 flash drive. We are no strangers to this drive, in-fact I was the first person that was able to get my hands on this drive for review and I have to give it to Kingston, the mind boggling capacity in such a small frame is one of last years greatest innovations and since its release, Kingston have seen a strong response from the community with a fair number of drives beings sold.

If you want to read more about the HyperX Predator 1TB, take a look at our full review where we have specs and performance benchmarks of this mega drive.

Images courtesy of eTeknix.com

Lexar JumpDrive M10 Secure 64GB Flash Drive Review

Introduction


Recently I’ve been taking a look at some of the newest flash drives on the market, including those from Lexar and whilst they may be either the fastest, best looking, or offer the best value for money, there is one area where they all fail. This is security. We hear about security all the time, and in the home or work place, security is key, after all we don’t want to let our data get out into the wrong hands. Typically this generally entails users locking their computers with a password and in the case of networks, securing the wireless with an encryption key for example. We also lock our buildings, filing cabinets, doors and vehicles, but for the most part, there is one everyday item that we tend to forget about; the humble USB flash drive.

When we look at the world of flash drives, they’re inexpensive to buy and their extremely convenient for moving and sharing data between point A and B with ease. This is all and well, but what happens when we lose then – let’s be honest we’ve all misplaced our flash drives at some point, be it on the home or office, or more worryingly when we are out and about. For the most part, the concern is not so much on having to replace the drive as they are easy to get hold of, the factor of getting the data back or someone else getting hold of the data if they find it is the real worry. Whilst some files are more mundane and harmless, from time to time there may be sensitive data on them such as personal details that is at risk of getting spread.

Take my personal circumstances, as a reviewer, I often have confidential files sent to me on unreleased products and when you hear us mention that we can’t disclose too much information due to an NDA (Non-Disclosure Agreement), we have to sign paperwork to declare that we will not reveal certain pieces of information. Loosing a flash drive with the sensitive information on for example is something that we would rather not do. Take graphics card launches as another example; in the run up to the launch date we always hear rumours and snippets of information being leaked out, but should we lose a flash drive and the wrong person get hold of the data then everything could be out in the open. This is what we try to avoid and thus brings us round to the item that I’ll be looking at today.

You may have recently read my review on Lexar’s JumpDrive P10 – one of their fastest and one of the fastest USB3.0 flash drives on the market with an astonishing price point but in the JumpDrive range there is another product that offers up something else of interest to many of us as opposed to speed – security. The JumpDrive M10 Secure offers up the piece of mind that your files are secure with industry leading 256-bit AES encryption through Lexars own EncryptStick Lite software, whilst offering up to 4x the speed of an equivalent USB2.0 drive and an always-on capacity meter. Available in capacities ranging from 16GB through to 128GB, the M10 is PC and Mac compatible, giving secure storage backed by a three-year warranty.

How Do You Pick A Proper Password? Google Is Here To Help

We all have at least one password, but how secure is your password? Do you really think about it? If your password is under 8 characters, or a dictionary word then now is probably the time to get it changed before it causes you issues.

We all use passwords, every day for most of us, wether it is to access our ATM, or to clock in at work, checking our email, or banking online. You probably type at least one password in per day. And if you are like the majority of people out there, you likely have a simple password consisting of the minimum amount of characters allotted on the website.

Loads of users use Google products every day, and Google is interested in your security, as much as you might think that they are not for your security. Why are they interested in your security? Well for one, you are their customer, they make money from you, even if you think that they don’t. You see those ads on the site you read, ooop, money. No matter where you go someone is making money off of you. Therefore, they are likely to be interested in you keeping your valuable information as secure as possible.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RCsHJfHL_4[/youtube]

Google produced this video to help you, the user to build a secure password, there are many different algorithms out there to build you the perfect password, all you need to do is look.

Yes, companies are bringing out two-factor authentication, such as log in with your phone, etc. If you don’t use it, you can’t make yourself secure, and if you refuse to make a secure password, you are doing just the same! Keep yourself safe by updating your password regularly, and making your password as secure as you possibly can.