Seagate Revises Earnings Forecast Down

 

With each year, the decline of hard drives continues on its inexorable course, bringing down the fortunes of the companies that manufacture them. In light of this, both Seagate and Western Digital have sought to diversify their portfolio to include NAND and other flash storage technologies. For Seagate though, the transition appears to have hit them heavily.The firm has cut their revenue projections for the quarter by $100 million.

In addition to the reduced revenue, the more important margins have also shrunk by 4%, though they are still respectable at 23%. Revenue has been dropping steadily over time as well, down 22% year over year. Much of the decline comes from the weakening PC market but some of it also comes from Seagate own market position. In order to boost margins, Seagate has chosen to leave the low capacity HDD market, read 500GB and below, as they aren’t cost competitive against SSDs. This is because it is nigh impossible for a HDD to drop below $40 due to part cost, making low capacity HDDs a bad bargain against SSDs of the same capacity.

The big holdout for HDDs remains high-capacity drives which offer untouchable GB/$. Still, Seagate can’t rely on those forever so the hope is that their own SSDs gain a foot hold in the market. Another consideration is when will their SandForce purchase finally pay off with new SSD controllers. I love SMI, Phison and Marvell as much as the next guy, but give me some SandForce compression magic!

Seagate NAS 8TB (ST8000VN0002) Hard Disk Drive Review

Introduction


Just as you wouldn’t use a low-end graphics card for high-end usage, you shouldn’t use the wrong hard disk drive in your storage system either. There is a reason for every product and you should always pick the one suited for the task at hand, especially when you deal with your storage. Today I’m taking a closer look at Seagate’s impressive 8TB NAS HDD and we will take a look at how well it performs.

As said, when you pick your storage, you need to pick the right one for the task and not just grab anything you can find. This is particularly important when we talk about systems that have to run continuously and in environments with a lot of drives closely packed together. The Seagate NAS HDD goes beyond the standard desktop drives in this regards as it is built exactly for these scenarios.

Vibrations can damage your drives and the can also have a direct impact on your drives speed, and the more drives you install close to each other, the more vibrations you’ll get. The Seagate NAS HDDs are rated for usage in systems with up to 8 bays which gives you an impressive raw capacity of 64TB. The Dual-plane balance system enhances drive performance in aggressive NAS workloads for better vibration tolerance.

The Seagate NAS 8TB drive comes packed with 256MB cache, which is double that of the 6TB model. It uses the default SATA3 6GB/s interface that makes it compatible with pretty much any NAS system. The performance isn’t without either as it comes with a rating of 150 IOPS and above and a sustained sequential read performance up to 230MB/s, an exceptional performance for a mechanical drive. The pure capacity is pretty nice too considering the default 3.5-inch form factor and it has an areal density of 1333Gb per square inch. The average seek read and write latencies are rated to be 8.5ms and 9.5ms, or lower. The whole thing is rounded off with an 180TB per year workload rating, a 1 million hour mean time before failure, and a 3-year warranty.

The great performance comes from Seagate’s years of experience that the put into the hardware and also the firmware that controls the drive. NASWorks is optimized for use as storage drives and it has been tuned to deliver higher performance, a better reliability and interoperability with popular NAS enclosures, and it has the RAID Recovery feature that prevents the NAS from a full RAID rebuild if the RAID degrades. Extended error recovery controls correct data without the need for full drive rebuilds.

Performance isn’t everything, but as we’ve seen above, that part is well covered. There are two further factors that need to be considered before you decide which drives to use: Acoustics and power consumption. A drive that consumes a lot of power can quickly drive up the total cost of ownership and it’s also bad for the environment. The Seagate NAS 8TB drive has an average power consumption of 9W during active operations and an idle power consumption of 7.2W. When in sleep or standby mode, the drives will consume as little as 0.6W. The 8TB NAS HDD doesn’t make much noise either and is rated for just 2.6 bels during operation and 2.5 bels when idle.

Seagate also offers the optional +Rescue Data Recovery Services for extra peace of mind. With this extra service, Seagate has your back and can recover the data from a possible failed drive. Whether the error is due to mechanical failure or accidental damage, most data can be recovered when done right. It is a fast and easy recovery process where your data can be restored in 15 days or less. This is also a field that Seagate is very successful in with an approximately 90% success rate in data recovery.

So if you need drives for backup and disaster recovery, multimedia server and storage, file and print server sharing, archival, remote access, virtualization, or a private cloud storage, then this might be just the right drive for you.

Feature Highlights

  • 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1TB capacity options
  • Seagate NAS HDDs are built and tested to provide industry-leading performance for small NAS systems.
  • NASWorks technology supports customised error recovery controls, power management and vibration tolerance for optimal performance and reliability with workloads up to 180TB/year workload rate limit (WRL).
  • NAS error recovery controls optimise drive health by helping to ensure drives are not dropped from the NAS and sent into a RAID rebuild.
  • Improved vibration tolerance and emission in multi-drive systems with dual plane balance.
  • Advanced power management supports multiple power profiles for lowpower, 24×7 performance.
  • Quiet drive operation enhances the customer experience in living room or office environments.
  • Optional 3-year Rescue recovery service plan protects against data loss from viruses, software issues, or mechanical and electrical breakdowns in a NAS or RAID environment.

Specifications

Package and Accessories

Seagate Reveals 10GBps NVMe SSD

Even though they are one of the Big 2 HDD manufacturers, Seagate has not neglected the growing importance of NAND and flash storage. Starting off with their Seagate 600 series of SSDs, the company has focused on bringing their brand to the enterprise flash storage segment. In line with that, Seagate has just revealed what is most likely the fastest SSD made yet. With up to 10GBps of throughput, the new Nytro SSDs will be fastest yet.

Using the NVMe storage protocol, the top model uses PCIe 3.0 x16 for peak performance. This gives the drive 15.75GBps of bandwidth though peak performance is limited to 10Gbps. This is well beyond what other NVMe SSDs, even those utilizing PCIe 3.0 use. In fact, the Nytro will likely be twice as fast as it’s competitors, most of whom can’t even saturate PCIe 3.0 x4, let alone PCIe 3.0 x8.

For the more power and price sensitive customers, Seagate will be introducing a toned down version using PCIe 3.0 x8, with 7.88GBps of bandwidth and 6.7Gbps of peak sequential throughput. Despite being the second tier of performance, this model should still give most of Seagate’s competitors a run for their money, with few drives being capable of even theoretically matching it.

For now, there is no word on pricing but given the performance and enterprise segment, expect a hefty price tag. There is no word yet on the controller or NAND used nor random performance, a more important metric for SSDs than sequential performance.

Seagate Sends Employees’ Payroll Information After Phishing Scam

Seagate is known for many things, but most of all they are known for their hard drives. I would recommend you look elsewhere if you are looking for something a little more secure I would say avoid them for now as it’s been revealed that employees’ payroll information was sent out after a phishing scam.

Phishing is the act of pretending to be someone else, asking for details (normally bank details or contact information) in order to gain access to information you normally couldn’t. From Nigerian Princes to Sergeant in the Army, they use anyone to obtain information. This time, the email claimed to be from Seagate’s CEO Stephen Luczo requesting data about current and former Seagate employees.

Believing the email to be genuine, the employee responded with the W-2 (Wage and Tax statement) documents. With the scope currently set at “several thousand” employees, the company has been working with federal law enforcement agencies since the incident on the 1st March. To help support their employees, two years of credit protection has been provided on the off chance that their data is used.

With most details of this nature being used in returning fraudulent tax returns with the IRS (something which is made all that much easier by being hacked recently), it could cost the government thousands if they don’t catch the culprits involved.

Seagate Targeted by Ridiculous Class-Action Lawsuit

It is always great to wake up to some news that makes one laugh and today is one of those days as Seagate is targeted with a ridiculous lawsuit. The Plaintiff Cristopher A. Nelson claims that Seagate has an inability to deliver non-defective hard drives that conform to their express and implied warranties, its breach of consumer protection, unfair competition and false advertising laws as well as its unjust enrichment. So far all sounds good in the sense of the lawsuit and not so good for consumers that might have been misled. However, the plaintiff solely bases his accusations on the misleading Backblaze reports that no one in the industry with respect for themselves take seriously as well as his own failed drive.

BackBlaze is a large-scale data hosting company, but it is one that takes alternate routes in order to provide their customers with cheap storage and that is where the problem lies. They will use any kind of hard disk drive in their large scale servers as long as it’s cheap, but it is far from every drive that suited for this kind of usage. A desktop drive is rated for 6-8 hours usage a day in systems with 1-4 drives installed, yet BackBlaze is using desktop drives in large scale servers that hold up to and above 50 drives while they run 24/7. Not only this, they also purchase the drives from any place they can find, including supermarkets where they most likely haven’t been handled properly before being sold.

So it isn’t really any surprise that BackBlaze is experiencing a lot of failures with these drives. As a farmer you wouldn’t go out and purchase an Opel Corsa or similar car to plow your fields with just because it is cheaper than a tractor. A good farmer knows that and a good hoster should also know what drives to pick. Yet they still use Seagate as they still provide them with cheaper storage than competition despite the failure rate.

Now you might ask yourself, why is it only Seagate that is affected by this and not the other companies that make hard disk drives used by BackBlaze? That is actually a very simple, BackBlaze only seems to purchase consumer drives from Seagate. WD drives in use by BackBlaze, for example, are WD RED drives and while they only are certified for 1-4 drive bays, they are manufactured for 24/7 usage and thereby will hold up better than equivalent desktop drives. In return, this means that the Seagate drives will look worse on their yearly reports.

But let us get back to the class-action lawsuit in question. The plaintiff apparently purchased a Seagate Backup Plus 3TB drive at BestBuy, an external storage drive, which then failed 2 years later. He then got a replacement on warranty which apparently failed about a year after receiving it. This is where the first red flag should pop up, actual multiple ones. But the main one is that he’s basing his lawsuit on two different products, internal and external storage, where the one even is being used wide outside their intended region of operation. I’d also like to question just how he handled that external drive, most people don’t treat external HDDs with as much care as they should.

I don’t expect this lawsuit to make it past any judge with just a little bit of respect for themselves and that it will be thrown out as soon as the judge finished reading the transcript. The lesson here is, buy products suited for the operation you need them for and treat them properly. Nothing more, nothing less.

Seagate Launches Their Own Helium HDD

Even as rival HGST started shipping helium based drives several years back, Seagate had managed to keep up in terms of capacity with less exotic technology. That’s all set to change as Seagate has finally launched their own helium based 10TB HDD. The new drive will do battle with the PMR based HGST Ultrastar He10 which just started shipping two months ago while the slower SMR based Ultrastar Archive Ha10 launched 7 months ago.

Just like the HGST drive, the Seagate® Enterprise 3.5 Capacity HDD features seven platters and 14 heads to read and write from them. With a helium fill, Seagate is probably running the drive at 7200rpm unlike normal drives which generally have to slow down when the platter count reaches 6. As an enterprise drive, it comes with a choice of either the standard SATA 3 port as well as the 12Gb/s SAS connector.

Reported reliability is the same as its chief competitor with 2.5 million hours MTBF, a nice bump over the usual 2 million. Due to the helium fill reducing turbulence nad allowing more platters, Seagate has stuck with PMR (perpendicular magnetic recording) and not with the performance crippling SMR (shingled magnetic recording). HAMR also isn’t used since that will probably be done with air-filled drives first. While HGST/WD has beaten Seagate to the punch with Helium, Seagate may bring HAMR out first given they’ve been talking about it a lot more.

Seagate Enterprise NAS 6TB HDD Four Disk RAID Review

Introduction


We’ve already had the pleasure of a single drive review of Seagate’s Enterprise NAS 6TB HDDs and today it has become time for the RAID review. Thecus provided me with five of these drives, but I’ll only be using four in this review today. Four is a magic number when it comes to RAID and the fifth drive would most likely be set as global spare in most systems anyway, so no point in added it. Four drives also give us a great consistency with other RAID reviews done in the past.

Seagate’s Enterprise NAS drives come in capacities ranging from 1TB and all the way up to 8TB, but I only got the 6TB models in today. The Enterprise NAS series is designed for cloud-based systems and NAS application. They offer support for the use in systems with up to 16 drive bays which is a double up compared to what consumer NAS drives offer. It is very important to use a drive that is properly suited for your area of operation and not just pick any random cheap drive from the shelve. A farmer wouldn’t use an SUV to plow his fields either, it’s just not built for the task. So forget all about misleading Backblaze reports as the figures, features, and warranties speak for themselves here.

The 6TB Seagate Enterprise NAS HDD comes with 128MB cache and a spindle speed of 7200RPM. This is quite a bit more than the variable speeded drives that come with a maximum speed of 5400RPM. This makes the drives a little louder, but the Enterprise NAS HDD is surprisingly silent compared to other 7200RPM drives and only generates 2.5 bels during idle and 2.7 bels maximum during seek operations.

The average seek times are set to 8.5ms reading and 9.5ms writing. The performance is rated with up to 216MB/s sustained data rate and an average read/write rate of 154MB/s. You can run the drive in harsher environments as the Enterprise NAS HDD will work from zero to 70 degrees and can withstand up to 70Gs shocks at 2ms read and 40Gs at 2ms write. This 6TB version is built with 12 heads total for the 6 1TB disks it houses.

The Enterprise NAS drives have a long endurance and great workload ratings. The endurance is rated for 300TB a year and they have a 1.2 million hour mean time before failure rating. Seagate is also backing these drives with a 5-Year warranty and also offers optional 5-Year Rescue Data Recovery options.

The available Rescue Data Recovery Service options can save the day when the worst case scenario happens. It is an extra feature that you might want to consider when dealing with your important data. Any company is more or less lost when they lose their digital data. Seagate Recovery Services (SRS) can save the day in the following situations: RAID controller failure, Lost RAID configuration, accidental reconfiguration, accidental re-initialization of the RAID array, power surges that cause multiple drive failures simultaneously, missing RAID partitions, reformatted RAID partitions, virus damage, natural disaster, human error and drive failures. Most data can be recovered in-lab with a nearly 90% success rate.

The drives are built on customer proven technologies coupled with the newest density platters that allow for lower power consumptions, smaller overall footprint, and lower total cost of ownership over previous drive generations. The RV sensors provide strong reliable performance and the controller is flashed with NAS-optimized firmware for balanced reads and writes.

The drives naturally support ATA8 streaming commands, NCQ, and are performance tuned for RAID applications. On-the-fly ECC algorithms make sure that the data arrives as it should and S.M.A.R.T. allows you to check on the drives status and health.

The PCB of the Seagate Enterprise NAS 6TB HDDs is well protected and the HDD controller and motor controller both feature heat transfer pads to help them stay cool in hot environments. The 128MB cache on the HDD is provided by an SK Hynix chip.

Features:

  • Enterprise-class reliability and performance for cloud-based storage and NAS applications in 1- to 16-bay enclosures
  • 1.2 million hours MTBF for enterprise-class reliability
  • 300TB-per-year workload rating for mid-range NAS and cloud-based storage
  • Backed by the Seagate 5-Year Limited Warranty
  • 7200-RPM spindle speed performance
  • Double the cache size, 256MB multisegmented on 8TB capacity, 128MB on the other sizes
  • Dual-stage actuators to deliver precision seeks every time
  • SATA 6Gb/s interface for easy integration into NAS and RAID rackmount systems
  • RV sensor for sustained performance and reliability
  • Optional 5-year Rescue Data Recovery Service plan protects against data loss in NAS and RAID environments.

Specifications

The specifications are taken directly from the manufacturers homepage at the time of the review and might as such be subject to possible future changes.

Seagate Releases Largest Consumer NAS HDD Yet

Even with SSDs driving the news cycle more and more, HDDs are still around and kicking. One of two major HDD firms Seagate has just launched their highest capacity NAS HDD with a whopping 8TB of storage space. The drive is oriented towards NAS users with NAS-specific features and RAID and comes with a 3-year warranty.

With 8TB of capacity, the new drive will be perfect for the home NAS in creating a personal cloud or simply for mass multimedia storage. Another major market is the burgeoning SOHO segment as more and more people start running small business’s and working from home.

The drive operates at the standard 7200rpm without resorting any exotic methods like helium fill. Using standard PMR (parallel magnetic recording), it packs 1.33TB per platter with a total of 6 platters. This backed up by 256MB of DRAM cache and connected over an SATA 3 interface, not the SAS commonly used by enterprise. Peak transfer rate should be about 216MB/s though that is a best case scenario unlikely to be encountered in real life. The rest of the lineup includes 1TB, 2TB, 3TB, 4TB and 6TB drives for those that don’t need such a massive drive. the only problem for such a large drive is backing up and restoring in case of drive failure.

Seagate Revamps Hard Drive Line-up @ CES 2016

CES 2016: Seagate is one of the leading hard drive manufacturers and renowned for creating high-capacity products at very competitive prices. Their LaCie range targets customers who desire a more luxury finish and prepared to pay extra for a stylish design. During CES 2016, Seagate showcased their flagship LaCie Chrome lineup which features a 1TB SSD and 10GB USB 3.1 interface. Apparently, this drive can reach speeds, “up to 940MB/second for intensive applications.” As you might have guessed, this is an expensive proposition and going to retail for $1100.

If the 1TB capacity seems overly limiting, then the Porsche range might be a more suitable choice. Starting from $210, the Porsche drives utilize an aluminium body and traditional HDD mechanism. The mobile disks come in 1TB, 2TB and 4TB options while the larger desktop SKUs are available in 4TB, 5TB and 8TB configurations. Additionally, the mobile and desktop versions support fast USB 3.0 speeds via a USB 3.1 Type-C connector. Although, the larger models have the capability to charge a laptop’s battery which is a welcome addition. Sadly, Seagate didn’t provide any pricing information about the Porsche disk drives, but I’m sure this will be revealed very soon.

Seagate CFO Claims HDDs to Remain Relevant for 15-20 more years

With each passing day, SSDs are growing in capacity and speed while their cost/GB continues to go down. Not surprisingly, HDD shipments have been falling steadily over the last few years as SSDs encroach their territory in storage. Despite the gloomy outlook, Seagate CFO thinks that HDDs will be here to stay, at least over the next 2 decades. Speaking at the Nasdaq 33rd Investor Program Conference David Morton said that:

“I believe HDDs will be along around for at least 15 years to 20 years”

While we would expect an HDD maker to express confidence in their product, HDDs will likely remain relevant for the near future. Despite the huge drops in price, SSDs still remain much pricier than their spinning disk cousins. Another major factor is that HDDs still continue to offer larger capacities in a single drive. With the introduction of HAMR and other technologies, HDDs will likely keep their lead at least till the end of the decade if not longer.

Even if SSDs do surpass HDDs in terms of capacity, hard drives may remain cheaper and thus more widely used for bulk storage. For those with large media collection and services that require immense amounts of storage, hard drives will likely remain cheaper for quite a while. With such an advantage, it seems highly likely that hard drives will be with us for quite a while yet.

Seagate 6TB Enterprise NAS HDD Review

Introduction


When Thecus sent me the amazing N7770-10G NAS a little while ago, they also sent along five of Seagate’s Enterprise NAS 6TB hard disk drives. While they are intended for NAS usage as the drive name already suggests, they still deserve a review on their own.

Seagate’s Enterprise NAS drives come in capacities ranging from 1TB and all the way up to 8TB, but I only got the 6TB models in today. The Enterprise NAS series is designed for cloud-based systems and NAS application and support the use in systems with up to 16 drive bays, double that of the consumer NAS drives. It is very important to use a drive suited for your area of operation and not just pick any random cheap drive from the shelve. A farmer wouldn’t use an SUV to plow his fields either, it’s just not built for the task. So forget all about misleading Backblaze reports, the figures, features, and warranties speak for themselves here.

The 6TB Seagate Enterprise NAS HDD comes with 128MB cache and a spindle speed of 7200RPM. This is also quite a bit more than the variable speeded drives that have a maximum speed of 5400RPM. This makes the drives a little louder, but the Enterprise NAS HDD is surprisingly silent compared to other 7200RPM drives and only generates 2.5 bels during idle and 2.7 bels maximum during seek operations.

The average seek times are set to 8.5ms reading and 9.5ms writing. The performance is rated with up to 216MB/s sustained data rate and an average read/write rate of 154MB/s. You can run the drive in harsher environments as the Enterprise NAS HDD will work from zero to 70 degrees and can withstand up to 70Gs shocks at 2ms read and 40Gs at 2ms write. This 6TB version is built with 12 heads total for the 6 1TB disks it houses.

The Enterprise NAS drives have a long endurance and great workload ratings. The endurance is rated for 300TB a year and they have a 1.2 million hour mean time before failure rating. Seagate is also backing these drives with a 5-Year warranty and also offers optional 5-Year Rescue Data Recovery options.

The available Rescue Data Recovery Service options can save the day when the worst case scenario happens. It is an extra feature that you might want to consider when dealing with your important data. Any company is more or less lost when they lose their digital data. Seagate Recovery Services (SRS) can save the day in the following situations: RAID controller failure, Lost RAID configuration, accidental reconfiguration, accidental re-initialization of the RAID array, power surges that cause multiple drive failures simultaneously, missing RAID partitions, reformatted RAID partitions, virus damage, natural disaster, human error and drive failures. Most data can be recovered in-lab with a nearly 90% success rate.

The drives are built on customer proven technologies coupled with the newest density platters that allow for lower power consumptions, smaller overall footprint, and lower total cost of ownership over previous drive generations. The RV sensors provide strong reliable performance and the controller is flashed with NAS-optimized firmware for balanced reads and writes.

The drives naturally support ATA8 streaming commands, NCQ, and are performance tuned for RAID applications. On-the-fly ECC algorithms make sure that the data arrives as it should and S.M.A.R.T. allows you to check on the drives status and health.

The PCB of the Seagate Enterprise NAS 6TB HDDs is well protected and the HDD controller and motor controller both feature heat transfer pads to help them stay cool in hot environments. The 128MB cache on the HDD is provided by an SK Hynix chip.

Features:

  • Enterprise-class reliability and performance for cloud-based storage and NAS applications in 1- to 16-bay enclosures
  • 1.2 million hours MTBF for enterprise-class reliability
  • 300TB-per-year workload rating for mid-range NAS and cloud-based storage
  • Backed by the Seagate 5-Year Limited Warranty
  • 7200-RPM spindle speed performance
  • Double the cache size, 256MB multisegmented on 8TB capacity, 128MB on the other sizes
  • Dual-stage actuators to deliver precision seeks every time
  • SATA 6Gb/s interface for easy integration into NAS and RAID rackmount systems
  • RV sensor for sustained performance and reliability
  • Optional 5-year Rescue Data Recovery Service plan protects against data loss in NAS and RAID environments.

Specifications

The specifications are taken directly from the manufacturers homepage at the time of the review and might as such be subject to possible future changes.

Thecus N7770-10G Elite-Class Business 7-Bay NAS Review

Introduction


Today’s review is a real pleasure for me as I get to take a closer look and test an elite class business NAS with built-in 10GbE and high availability function. I got Thecus’ N7770-10G 7-bay business NAS on the table and I’m going to give it thorough testing to show you just how amazing it is.

When I review consumer class NAS devices, I often talk about how they are suited for all sorts of media and streaming needs as that is the main focus for that group. The Thecus N7770-10G does all this too and it does it great, but it isn’t what it was designed for. This is a business class NAS and as such it needs a whole other set of features and functionality. You get a complete backup solution that includes the use of external devices, cloud backup, snapshots, and client backup as well as total security thanks to Intel Security Antivirus, AES 256-bit encryption, and VPN server functionality. The N7770-10G still provides all the mobile connectivity and media streaming capabilities as well as centralized authentication control.

The Thecus N7770-10G NAS isn’t built around a low-power ARM or Intel Celeron CPU, instead it’s built with a full Intel Core i3-2120 dual-core processor that has a base clock speed of 3.3GHz. To go with that CPU, you get 8GB DDR3 ECC memory that is expandable all the way to 32GB, dual Gigabit Ethernet, 10GbE card pre-installed, and 7 drive bays for a lot of raw storage.

It is my personal opinion that we have been stuck at 1Gbps ethernet connections for way too long. While we had the ability to link those together to achieve better connections, it is old by now and today’s needs also increase the need for better connectivity. In that regard, I’m glad to see Thecus having this model with an included 10GbE adapter, making it ready for the step into the next speed category. It still features two Intel 82574L Gigabit Ethernet connections too, which you naturally all can link aggregate and trunk. Further, you get a total of six USB 2.0 ports where two of them are on the front and two USB 3.0 ports on the rear. The HDMI port further allows you to turn your NAS into the ultimate multimedia hub by connecting the NAS directly to your TV or monitor.

The N7770-10G supports RAID 0, 1, 5, 6 10, 50 and JBOD modes besides single disk usage. You can create multiple RAID volumes with different modes, only limited by the amount of drives you have available for the pool. Should a hard drive malfunction occur, changing one is simple thanks to online RAID migration and expansion, hot spare, and auto rebuild. You can also pick which filesystem you prefer as the N7770-10G supports EXT3, EXT4, Btrfs and XFS for increased flexibility and ability to suit many different types of environments. Users can simultaneously use different file systems across multiple RAID volumes to get the best of each one.

iSCSI Thin-Provisioning is a thing that many people still read past as they don’t really know what it is, but it is well worth getting the handle on, as you can manage your storage better and get better speeds. Connect through iSCSI for the fastest data transfer speeds available and make wasted disk space a thing of the past with thin provisioning’s flexible storage functionality. Windows Server, NT, and XP users will need to download the iSCIC initiator from Microsoft, but Windows 7, 8, and 10 users, for example, have it built right into the OS. If in doubt, just search for iSCSI from your Windows start menu search.

Two awesome features in Thecus NAS’ that often are overlooked, are the Disk Clone and Disk Wipe functions. Both can be extremely useful for both business and home users. The Disk Clone features allows you to copy the entire contents of a disk to one or many other disks while the Disk Wipe function allows you to permanently destroy a volumes data.

Business data is sensitive data and sensitive data needs to be protected. Thecus N7770-10G offers AES 256-bit RAID volume encryption that allows you to fully encrypt the entire RAID volume. Sensitive data also has to be sent and received with the proper security, for this you can set up the VPN server. It allows users to remotely access a secure network with the equipment already at hand.

Data Guard backup solution is the ultimate software as it provides both local and remote parts. Currently, data is backed up across RAID volumes and external drives. In addition, Data Guard uses innovative technology to sync data across the network to other NAS and servers. It makes managing NAS user-friendly and convenient. But there are many ways to backup your data and the Thecus N7770-10G pretty much supports them all.

With BTRFS support, users can enjoy the simplicity of snapshot backups. Snapshots of data at various time points can be manually or automatically made and just as easily later restored to rollback files or folders to previous states. Rsync is probably the most common used technique and Thecus supports this too. It gives great flexibility with remote backup capability, a flexible scheduler, and the stability of Linux-based transfer.

You can easily create your own cloud solution with the Thecus N7770-10G, but that doesn’t mean that the existing cloud providers should be counted out. There can be many reasons to use these services and Thecus supportsDropBox, Amazon S3, and ElephantDrive cloud backup functionality. The best here is that it is as easy to use and setup as all the normal and local sharing functions.

Data Burn is another great feature that comes in line with the previous mentioned Disk Clone and Disk Wipe features. With Data Burn, you can connect a CD, DVD, or Blue-ray burner and create physical optical backups of your data. In addition, it also supports burning of ISO image files instead. You can of course also use a connected optical drive to easily backup the data to your NAS.

When you buy a Thecus NAS like this, you also get a few extra software pieces that are well worth having. The hardware in itself is solid quality while failovers and redundancies are available for almost all systems. But you also need to protect your files and an Antivirus software is perfect for this. Thecus partnered with McAfee and includes their award-winning software for free.

Acronis True Image is also included for free and it is one of the easiest ways to manage your backups, I use it quite often on both a personal level and for my reviews setups. It is one of the easiest pieces of backup software available with a long set of functions and One-click protection setups.

Keeping an eye on the NAS while you’re on the go isn’t a problem either thanks to iOS and Android connectivity. With T-OnTheGo and the T-Dashboard, you can manage your NAS, and upload to and download/stream from your NAS using an iOS or Android device on the go.

Feature Highlights

  • Intel Core i3-2120 (3.3.GHz Dual Core) processor
  • 8 GB DDR3 ECC Memory (Expandable to 32 GB)
  • 10GbE card included
  • 1 x HDMI port
  • Hot-swappable hard drives
  • RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and JBOD

Packaging and Accessories

The front and the back of the box look the same, and it looks stunning. There is no doubt looking at the package that we’re dealing with a premium NAS. The feature highlights as well as the NAS itself are shown clearly and easy to spot.

The side of the box goes more into detail on the specifications and package content. This is also where it will be marked what market it is intended for, which really only comes down to what power cable is included.

The other side shows the feature highlights and how it can be useful in pretty much any scenario. As the box says, A NAS for every need.

Inside the box we find a power cable for our region, a single RJ45 ethernet cable, four keys for the drive trays, screws for seven 3.5-inch drives and screws for seven 2.5-inch drives as well as a utilities disk, warranty card, and quick installation guide.

Seagate SSHD 2TB Solid State Hybrid Drive Review

Introduction


When we think storage, we usually think in one of two directions. Either we think of the traditional mechanical hard disk drives with large capacities for a low-cost or solid state drives with the higher speeds but smaller capacity. There is a third group of drives that shouldn’t be forgotten in all of this and it is placed right in between the HDD and SSDs, taking a little of both worlds in order to create a hybrid drive. Today I’m taking the look at just such a drive, the Seagate Solid State Hybrid Drive (SSHD) with 2 TB capacity.

Solid State Hybrid Drives deliver speed and capacity for gaming and high-performance desktop applications in an intelligent way, by combining a small amount of NAND flash to keep the hot files with a large portion of mechanical storage for everything else. That is also where the simple term Hybrid Drive comes from. The Seagate SSHD is able to boot Windows 8 in less than 10 seconds and perform up to five times better than a 7200 RPM desktop hard drive, measure in PCMark Vantage. It can also improve the overall system responsiveness by 30% over a traditional hard disk drive. It is a drive that will give you the best of both worlds.

The smart algorithm used is Seagate’s Adaptive Memory technology that effectively identifies the most frequently used data and stores it in the NAND flash. The self-learning software algorithms make laptop hardware, firmware, and high-speed NAND flash work together to create a perfect balance. The software technology monitors data usage dynamically and determines what data should be copied to the flash. The result, you get boot times that are greatly increased and very close to SSD levels. The same goes for your frequent used application loading times and overall system responsiveness.

The Seagate SSHD 2TB has 8GB MLC NAND for the intelligent caching mechanism and 64MB DRAM Cache for the normal HDD part. The drive has a spindle speed of 7200RPM and an average seek time of less than 9.5ms. The drive is composed of 4 heads and 2 disks with a load/unload cycle rating of 300,000. With a power consumption of 6.7W during typical operation and 0.75W in sleep and standby modes, it is also an efficient drive.

The great thing with an SSHD drive is that you don’t need any extra configurations, software, or setups. You just plug it in like any other drive, connect data and power cables and it is ready to increase your system’s performance over a standard hard disk drive. Just how much of an improvement will be seen in the benchmarks on the following pages

Specifications

The specifications are taken directly from the manufacturers homepage and might be subject to change in possible future revisions of the drives.

Packaging and Accessories

The Seagate SSHD comes as a kit version and as a bare drive like I got for this review. Below is a shot of how the retail package looks and there isn’t much else in the box beside the drive itself. You do get an installation manual in the kit version, but it is more of a secure sales box for the drives that are sold in the retail market.

Thecus Adds Seagate 8TB Enterprise HDDs to Official Compatibility List

Thecus announced the addition of Seagate’s impressive 8TB Enterprise 3.5-inch hard disk drives to its official compatibility list. By incorporating Seagate’s 8TB HDD, Thecus NAS users will be able to maximize storage capacity while experiencing enhanced performance and reliability.

Hard drives aren’t just hard drives and there is a lot of difference in them and it’s quite important to pick one that is suited for your task, especially when your dealing with mission critical data. The Seagate 8TB Enterprise HDDs boast the industry’s best response times and are on their own over 100% faster than their own previous generation. These drives are naturally designed to support 24/7 performance and can stand up to a workload of 550TB per year. Other advanced technologies including PowerBalance, PowerChoice, and Raid Rebuilt enables users to customize their big data requirements and optimize TCO.

“Providing compatibility to new, cutting-edge technologies is essential to Thecus and allows users to utilize the best the industry has to offer with their Thecus NAS,” said Florence Shih, CEO at Thecus Technology Corp. “Pairing the 8TB Seagate Enterprise 3.5 Hard Drives with Thecus NAS empower organizations using big data with a reliable, high-capacity storage solution.”

The drives are available as both SAS 12Gbps, SAS 6Gbps, and SATA 6Gbps versions, allowing you to make the right choice depending on what Thecus NAS you might be running. You can check out the full compatibility list for your Thecus model on the official website.

Seagate Announces Three New 8TB Hard Disk Drives

Seagate announced that not one but three new 8TB hard disk drives have been added to their portfolio. The three new drives are from the Seagate Enterprise Capacity, Seagate Enterprise NAS, and Seagate Kinetic HDD series and all got the 8TB upgrade. While these aren’t the first 8TB drives, they are worth a closer look as they’re a force in themselves.

The first new 8TB drive comes from the Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD series and this is where reliability meets high-capacity. The drive is aimed at the cloud markets where I’m sure that it will be welcome with open arms. The drive performs with a 100 percent increase in random read and write performance compared to its previous generation. That is quite an accomplishment and impressive.

Moving on to the small and medium-sized business oriented drives and we find the new Seagate Enterprise NAS HDD. There isn’t the big performance improvement here like there was in the Capacity line, but the new 8TB drives do allow companies to reduce the amount of drives they need and thereby the server sizes as well power consumption. An overall saving on the running costs and less hardware to worry about, that sounds like a good deal.

The Seagate Kinetic HDD series is the most interesting of the new 8TB options, but it is also the one that isn’t for home users at all, at least not yet. The Seagate Kinetic HDDs take a new approach on storage infrastructure as it is based on the Kinetic Open Storage Platform. The open source object storage protocol combined with Ethernet connectivity allows the Kinetic HDD to eliminate multiple layers of legacy hardware and software infrastructure with a simple Key/Value interface. This in return dramatically reduces the need for traditional storage servers. The reduction in equipment, power consumption, and human expenses results in a total cost of ownership saving of up to 70 percent. The LHC in Cern is one of the places where the Kinetic HDDs are being used to store and analyze the many petabytes of data collected.

Seagate Creates Highest Capacity 2.5″ 7mm HDD

The mechanical hard drive is far from dead despite the face solid state and hybrids drives march forward and intend to conquer the market. There are still a lot of improvements that can be done on the mechanical siblings and Seagate proved that again by creating the highest density 2.5-inch HDD in a slim 7mm package.

As an SSD user, you might be used to the 7mm drives, but most HDDs come in the larger form factors with a height of 9.5mm to 15mm. Seagate has achieved an impressive 1TB per 2.5-inch platter which in return allows them to release a new 2.5-inch 7mm HDD with 2TB capacity. That is quite impressive and will surely lead to higher versions with more capacity as well.

“In an industry first, our engineers have been able to boost areal density to 1 TB per platter in a 2.5-inch form factor, which will give OEMs the flexibility to design and build virtually any kind of mobile device they can envision, with plenty of storage to boot,” said Mark Re, Seagate’s chief technology officer. “Combining new mechanical firmware architectures, with state of the art heads, media and electronic design, this technology is a real game changer- providing four times more capacity than a 0.25 TB SSD at a substantially lower cost.”

The new drive technology is the first to incorporate recording-subsystem components-head, media, preamp, channel-to achieve even greater areal densities, well ahead of competitive offerings. Its advanced high-spatial efficiency mechanics delivers a lightweight drive, low acoustics, and strong mechanical robustness capable of new levels of drive stability even when subject to intense shock and vibrations.

The drive is also 25 percent lighter than the previous generation Seagate mobile hard drive products, smaller, and more efficient. Seagate is already working on an SSHD version of the drive as well. Both the HDD and the SSHD drives are surely something to look forward too.

Seagate Backup Plus Portable Drive 2TB USB 3.0 Review

Introduction


Seagate released their Backup Plus Slim Portable Drive a while ago, but it is still a very valid product and one that shouldn’t be missed. Today I’m taking a closer look at the blue colored version of the Backup Plus Slim Portable Drive with a capacity of 2TB and a USB 3.0 connection.

The thin and light drive is easy to carry everywhere and is perfect to keep all those files that wouldn’t fit on a normal thumbs drive. The thumbs drives might get bigger, but they haven’t reached the 2TB capacity yet and certainly not at a price point that this USB 3.0 hard disk can be had for. It certainly is a lot of storage in a small size and for a good price, and that is something that we like.

The Seagate Backup Plus Slim Portable Drive isn’t just small and light, it’s also sleek and tough thanks to the metal design. The drive measurements are tiny, it is just 113.5mm long, 76mm wide, and typically weighs 159 grams.

The use of a micro connector is obvious here as we couldn’t have this small a drive without. The USB 3.0 connection provides a lot more bandwidth than USB 2.0 as well as major access improvements when dealing with UASP enabled ports.

Seagate’s Dashboard software also works with this drive and it is a great piece of software. All your photos, movies and videos can be backed up using the Seagate Dashboard, including the ones you’ve shared on Facebook, Flickr, and YouTube. Use the Seagate Mobile Backup app to create backups directly from your mobile devices and easily share your content between PCs and Macs. The Seagate Backup Plus Slim Portable Drive is also compatible with Lyve, so all of your photos and videos can be easily shared.

Not only do you get a 2-year warranty with this drive, Seagate also threw in a bonus in the form of a 2-year access to OneDrive with 200GB online storage valued at $95. That makes the drive kind of free if you had planned to purchase that service anyway.

Packaging and Accessories

The drive packaging is simple but provides all the necessary details right off. Brand, drive series, capacity, and the bonus is all mentioned on the front of the box.

The rear side features a little more information about OneDrive and the activation details as well as a little information on Lyve.

Inside the box, you’ll find a USB 3.0 cable as well as the quick start guide to get going in case you shouldn’t know how. The drive is pre-formatted, so all you need to do is plug it in and start using it.

Seagate Increases The External Seven Drive’s Capacity by 50%

Seagate celebrated their 35th Birthday with the beautiful Seven drive back in January at CES in Las Vegas and they’ve now released a new version that adds 50% more capacity to the drive. The first version came with 500GB capacity, but now the gorgeous 7mm thick portable USB 3.0 Seven drive can be had with 750GB capacity too.

Seagate has made some progress in their 2.5-inch drives which has allowed them to increase the size of normal 2.5-inch drives up to 3TB by using 750GB platters inside the drive. Using the same technology has allowed them to increase the capacity of the Seven.

The Seven is the world’s slimmest portable hard drive and only measures 7mm in thickness. This was achieved by using the actual drive housing as hard disk housing as well instead of just putting a normal 2.5-inch drive into an enclosure with a USB adapter board. The deep draw process used allows for the all-steel enclosure to be shaped in a method that the material could not be any thinner and still hold the structural integrity. The steel encasing also provides a rigidity, which allows for the incredibly thin design to be functional, while the low profile motor technologies used are designed to include extreme Gyro handling capabilities.

Seagate did not disclose any price on the new version. The 500Gb model holds its $99.99 MSRP till this day, so we can expect the 750GB version to cost around $130. A premium price for the capacity, but you also get a unique drive that looks amazing.

First Prototype Seagate HAMR HDDs limited to 4TB

Even as we transition more and more to speedy SSDs, developments are still occurring in HDD land. Having explored the limits of what is practical with Helium filled Shingled Magnetic Recording drives, Seagate is moving onto HAMR or Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording which will allow HDDs to  scale beyond 16TB. Initial prototypes drives set to ship in late 2016 will be coming in a much more pedestrian 4TB though.

As HAMR is still in the early stages, the laser which provides the heat is too large, requiring more room between platters. This limits what Seagate can do until their refine the technology to ship 100TB HDDs in 2025.  Both Western Digital and subsidiary HGST are working on HAMR as well and even third wheel Toshiba is planning 128TB HDDs.

HAMR changes the bit density paradigm of HDDs which currently use a strong magnetic field to flip a bit permanently on a platter. Bit density is getting harder to achieve as it gets more and more difficult to shrink the  magnetic field. A magnetic field that is too large can risk flipping nearby bits and corrupting data. What HAMR does is to allow a change in platter material. Using a laser, a certain small area is heated up and a strong magnetic field applied to flip the bit. This field does not have to be small as before as the platter material won’t flip unless it hits a certain temperature. This means the bits can be as dense as the width of the laser, eliminating the issue of the magnetic field inadvertently flipping nearby bits.

For the first prototype, Seagate is starting off with an 810 nm wavelength and 20 mW power laser. This will heat up the target bit to 450c and then allow it to cool, all within 20ns. Seagate hopes to initially hit a target of 1.5 Tbits(Terabits) per square inch over the current 1 Tbits per square inch. No word yet has been released about the rpm of the prototype HAMR drive. Don’t get your hopes up about getting an HAMR drive in later 2016 as probably only certain partners will receive it.

Thank you heise for providing us with this information

Seagate CEO – No One Uses SSDs for Storage

Seagate CEO Stephen J. Luczo has had some interesting choice words to say about how SSDs are used. In an earnings call to investors, Luczo noted that “no one uses SSDs for storage”. Coming from a hard drive sector that is on the decline as SSDs are ascending, those are pretty strong words.

There is truth to those words for both data centres and consumers at large. Due to the still prohibitive cost of SSDs, most consumers who have SSDs tend to only keep their OS and applications on their SSDs and store their multimedia and backups on their HDDs. The same goes for data centres where only hot data is cached to SSDs and most things are still stored to spinners.

However, hard drive shipments are on the decline as SSDs drop both in price and increase in capacity. Even Luczo, to his credit, is forced to admit a few % of users use SSDs all the way. Seagate has also tried to respond by pushing hybrid drives, their own SSDs and even buying the once great SSD controller firm Sandforce. Even if the continuing growth of cloud services might help boost hard drive use in the short term, Seagate, WD and Toshiba must either continue to grow value and capacity ahead of SSDs or face obsolescence.

Seagate Wireless 500GB Mobile Storage Review

Introduction


Portable storage isn’t just portable storage anymore. There are many different connectors, ports and protocols that can be used and it can all be a little bit confusing at times. Especially if you want to use your storage on multiple different devices at once. Seagate has created the Wireless 500GB Mobile Storage drive for this and it comes with both USB and WiFi capabilities.

With 500GB of storage at your disposal, the Seagate Wireless Mobile Storage allows you to bring along hundreds of movies or thousands of songs, photos, and other files. You can simply stream them via WiFi to your smartphone, tablet or even Smart TV.

There is no need for wires or internet connections, the Seagate Wireless Mobile Storage has a built in hotspot that allows you to connect directly to it – but you can also connect it with the included USB 2.0 cable and microUSB port on the drive.

With 500GB of capacity and a battery that lasts up to 6 hours, the Wireless is as mobile as you are and should last just as long as any mobile device playing movies. Don’t worry about maxing out device capacity or your data usage plan when it’s all in your pocket.

Up to three people can connect to the Seagate Wireless at once and it is compatible with almost any device: Android, Windows 8, iOS, AirPlay, LG Smart TVs, Chromecast, Roku and Kindle fire among others.

The Seagate Wireless even has the ability to automatic backup new files on your device so you always have a safe copy and you can also connect it to the Seagate services.

Pick the colour of your choice, the Seagate Wireless doesn’t just come in a boring black or white scheme, although those are available as well. You can get the drive in black, white, blue, red and green – or get them all to match whatever outfit you might be wearing that day.

Specifications

  • Capacity: 500GB
  • Interface: WiFi, USB 2.0
  • Dimensions:  125.36mm / 125.36mm / 24.5mm (W/H/D)
  • Weight: 281g
  • Warranty: 2-year limited warranty

Seagate Collaborates With CERN Openlab To Develop Kinetic Storage Platform

The European Organization for Nuclear Reasearch, CERN, produces a massive amount of data to be analyzed, but also stored, a thing that’s becoming an increasing problem with the 2-3 petabytes of information it produces on a monthly basis. The Large Hadron Collider has generated over 100 petabytes of data to date, and all of it has to be kept safe and secure.

Seagate and CERN Openlab have now entered a 3-year partnership on the development of Seagate’s Kinetic Open Storage platform. The new platform restructures the traditional storage server architectures from the bottom up by connecting object-oriented applications directly to the storage device. This cuts out the many layers of hardware and software traditionally used and is something that is said to not only improve performance but also cut costs by 15-40%. It’s kind of a System in a Disk, to say it in the simplest of words.

“This is a thrilling opportunity for Seagate to collaborate with CERN to more efficiently operate one of the most extreme and demanding storage environments in the world,” said Scott Horn, vice president of marketing at Seagate. “We believe our partnership will not only deliver extensive benefits to CERN’s large-scale storage system, but also help us further enhance the Seagate Kinetic Open Storage platform by testing it in an unparalleled data creation environment.”

A second and future research project between Seagate and CERN is also planned where they will look at CERN’s EOS storage system to determine whether there are opportunities to enhance and improve the system.

Thanks to Seagate for providing us with this information

LaCie Announced Porsche Design Mobile Drive with USB-C Connector

Apple just announced their new MacBook and there is a lot of talk about the USB-C technology. Android smartphones will also feature the connector soon and Asus has already presented their full lineup of device. But a connector isn’t enough, we also need to attach something to it. For that, LaCie announced the addition of USB-C technology to its Porsche Design Mobile Drive that is available up to 2TB capacity.

For those who don’t know it, LaCie is the premium brand of Seagate and they make some truly beautiful drives for those who want something special. The Porsche Design Mobile Drive has been specially designed with its aluminium finish to match the MacBooks, but it will of course work with any system. It supports Time Machine backups and transfer speeds up to 100 MB/s.

The user-friendly USB-C connector makes it easier than ever to connect these new drives, we all know the three-turn USB connection move. For compatibility, the LaCie drive also comes with an included adapter for USB 3.0 or USB 2.0 ports.

The LaCie Mobile Drive enclosure is made from 3 mm thick solid aluminum and the drive comes backed by a two-year warranty. Availability is set for next quarter with a 500GB slim size model as well as 1TB and 2TB models. No word on pricing yet.

Thanks to LaCie for providing us with this information

Micron and Seagate Forge Strategic Alliance

February 12, 2015 saw the announcement of a new strategic alliance between these two storage giants; combining both innovation and expertise of both companies. The aim of this alliance is to produce ultra high end storage solutions that would give us the “next evolution” stage.

While initially focusing on next-gen SAS SSD’s and NAND supply, both anticipate this agreement will extend into the future to produce collaborative enterprise storage solutions featuring Micron NAND flash memory.

“As two of our key partners, we look forward to the benefits of this Micron and Seagate collaboration in future NAND flash-based storage technologies,” said Mike Kerouac, President of Global Product Operations for EMC Corporation.

“The strategic agreement between Micron and Seagate promises to deliver new and innovative flash-based storage solutions,” said Trevor Schick, Senior Vice President, EG Global Supply Chain, HP.

“This agreement enables Seagate to secure a strategic supply of NAND flash memory and enables collaboration on future products and technologies,” said Phil Brace, Executive Vice President, Electronics Solutions, Seagate. “Our companies are leaders in the storage industry, and in working together we build on that success.”

If you’ve been living under a rock for some time and are unaware of who Micron or Seagate are, please follow their respective links.

Thank you to Seagate and Micron for sharing this information with us

Seagate to Cease Thunderbolt Support

Seagate has announced that it is to cease mainstream support for the Thunderbolt interconnection standard. The Thunderbolt hardware interface was developed by Intel and Apple as a faster alternative to USB connectors. It is the de facto standard on Apple computers, such as the iMac, but adoption by other platforms has been slow to non-existent.

Now, HDD giant Seagate has dealt the system a significant blow by ending support for it, the company favouring the USB 3.0 standard, and planning ahead for the forthcoming USB 3.1. However, Seagate subsidiary LaCie is to continue Thunderbolt support. LaCie, bought by Seagate in 2012, produces external hard drives designed to fit the Apple aesthetic.

Source: BitTech

Seagate First to Support VMware Virtual SAN with 12Gb/S SAS HDDs and SSDs

Seagate announced that its Enterprise Performance 15K HDD and the 1200 SSD 12Gb/s SAS drives have been certified by VMware as interoperable storage tiers for VMware Virtual SAN. This is an industry first, the drives now support Virtual SAN for VMware vSphere, a new hypervisor-converged storage platform, delivering the benefits of faster, more reliable and cost-effective shared data for traditional data centers and emerging cloud infrastructures.

“We are pleased to partner with VMware to provide a path for the future with 12Gb/s support for VMware in data centers,” said Scott Horn, Seagate vice president of marketing. “The only VMware certified 12Gb/s solution in the industry, these drives coupled with the VMware vSphere platform deliver the optimum performance in terms of speed, scalability and efficiency— a winning combination that will enable us to provide unparalleled performance.”

The drives went through a rigorous certification process to ensure that the overall solution meets VMware Virtual SAN customer requirements, but both families of drives are now listed on the VMware Compatibility Guide.

The industry partners love the news, with Lenovo, Dell, and Supermicro, all are big players in the server market, expressing positive statements and are pleased to be part of it with their server solutions.

“At Dell, we take pride in our ability to introduce industry-leading solutions that increase storage performance while maintaining data integrity, system reliability and exceptional value,” said Brian Payne, executive director, Dell server solutions. “We’ve worked in lock-step with VMware and Seagate to ensure customers who want to deploy Virtual SAN can do so on the best platform in the industry. VMware’s certification of Seagate 12Gb/s SAS hard disk drives further exemplifies this point and complements Dell’s latest server and storage portfolios.”

“Supermicro offers the widest range of 12Gb/s SAS3 server and storage solutions on the market supporting Seagate’s new 12Gb/s SAS 15K HDD/1200 SSDs,” said Don Clegg, vice president of marketing and business development at Supermicro. “With our combined VMware certified FatTwin Virtual SAN solutions, enterprise and cloud providers can now accelerate deployment of cost-effective, virtualized infrastructure, delivering customers higher performance and greater efficiency with increased reliability.”

“Lenovo enterprise customers demand cutting-edge storage technology and Seagate’s 12Gb/s SAS delivers just that providing high-performance and robust enterprise reliability that they can trust,” said Darrel Ward, vice president, enterprise storage, enterprise business group, Lenovo. “VMware’s certification of this technology only reinforces our assertion that Seagate is a technology leader when it comes to storage solutions.”

Thanks to Seagate for providing us with this information

3TB Seagate Hard Drives Have 43% Failure Rate, According to Backblaze

Cloud storage provider Backblaze, in its 2014 ‘Hard Drive Annual Failure Rate’ graph, reports that the 3TB Seagate Barracuda drives it used for its storage service had a 43.1% failure rate over 2014. Other Seagate models also performed badly, with the 1.5TB Barracuda 7200.11 failing 23.8% of the time.

It must be noted that Backblaze exposed the drives to heavy stress, using them 24/7 to support user data. Seagate’s drives, designed purely to serve as home external storage devices, are not expected to handle more than eight hours use a day, nor be used as part of a massive vibrating enclosure, so it is baffling why Backblaze would continue to use Barracuda HHDs for a task they are so ill-suited to.

Not every hard drive manufacturer fared as badly as Seagate, though. HGST drives in particular proved to be very reliable under heavy use, with its 2 to 4TB drives boasting only a 2.3% rate of failure for the year, and the 2TB 7K2000 model leading the pack with a 1.1% failure rate.

Source: Ars Technica