Google Announces Cloud Source Repositories

Working on a project is difficult, working on a project with multiple people is difficult, working on a project with multiple people, in multiple locations and with multiple devices is difficult. What I’m saying is working on something is difficult, anyone that’s ever programmed can attest to this. People often use things like Github, Microsoft’s Azura cloud or Amazons web service to keep your work up to date, this means that if you (or a friend) made a change to your work everyone would have access to the newly created work without any difficulty.

Google is going to try become a part of this market, with the announcement of its latest service, Cloud Source Repositories. The service is currently in beta and hopes to become a go-to for group projects and people who enjoy coding. In its description Google has stated that it will have a private Git repository, which will not only integrate and work with a majority of the existing tools but will also feature a high level of encryption, making sure that your files are secure and for your eyes only. With access to the Google Cloud Platform, and later in the year a new API launcher and a new cloud debugger, the system looks to provide you with all the tools you take for granted while guaranteeing you access to Google’s knowledge and support for your projects.

Do you use a cloud repository for your work? If so would you be tempted to try out Google’s new service or are you happy with your current one?

Thank you TechSpot for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Google.

Saving Rhino’s By 3D Printing Their Horns

The problem is an old and well-known one. Poaching. Rhino’s are hunted for the belief that their horns possess qualities such as being able to treat fevers or making skin look more beautiful. With these beliefs come a demand for the horns, with a price of roughly 40,000 per kilogram of rhino horn. The demand has grown so bad, and the poachers so desperate, that the last northern white rhino is under permanent armed guards to help protect it from poachers.

BioTech startup Pembient hopes to have come up with the solution by taking the rhino horn back to its core, and by that I mean what its made out of. Rhino horns are made of keratin, a fibre everyone knows about because it’s contained within your fingernails and hair. That’s right, the same thing you have growing from your hands is made out of exactly the same thing a rhino’s horn is made out of.

Pembient hopes that by using this protein, with a little help from a 3D printer and some rhino DNA, to print out rhino horns which will be nearly indistinguishable from the ones taken from a living rhino. The benefit of this, not only will the horns be quite easy to make and easy to sell, they will available at 1/8th of the price that the removed horns go for. With such a price difference and ease of supply, Pembient hopes to be able to print the poachers out of business by flooding the market, effectively making the job a waste of time for poachers. Another bonus is that because the horn is available created from pure keratin (and rhino DNA) it will be free from the effects of pollutants.

I dislike poachers, even more so those which target creatures that are extinct or near extinction just for an easy pay-day. With this solution in mind, the fight against illegal rhino poaching may finally come to an end as the clients get what they want and the poachers get nothing for the crimes they’ve committed.

Thank you IFLScience for the information.

Image courtesy of Save The Rhino.

Microsoft “Office Lens” Document Scanner App for Android Beta Released

Microsoft just released the Android beta app for “Office Lens”, an app that allows you to capture notes, business cards, receipts, and other printed material to be saved as a digital file. The app can also capture things like whiteboards and save them as a digital file, a useful tool for capturing meeting notes in the office.

The written text will be recognized with OCR, transforming what was written into text that you can edit. Using the app is very simple, and to start you just open the app and use the camera to capture your image.  The app takes care of the rest by framing, cropping, and enhancing the image. The resulting file can be saved to your gallery, Word, PowerPoint, OneDrive, OneNote, or as a PDF. To get started with the app you will need to join the beta community on Google+ and sign up to test the app.

Source: Android Police

Facebook Introduces “Save” Feature for Links, Music and Places

It is getting harder and harder to keep up with all the content we read on the web, our Facebook news feeds are already having to be curated heavily just to deal with the massive influx of posts that would otherwise stream faster than we could catch up, much like Twitter does when we follow a few hundred people.

Now Facebook have one solution, adding a featured called “Save”, which is fairly self-explanatory, clicking it will move all the links, places, music, TV shows or anything else you’ve flagged into a special section on both your desktop and mobile. So if you don’t have time to read that eTeknix article because you’re at work, save it, pick it up later on the train home the end of the day.

Once accessed or read, you can the share with friends or archive the content you had saved. Facebook can also send you push notifications about items you’ve saved from the news feed, but that you haven’t click yet.

Will this be enough to help Facebook compete with other “Save” style apps such as Pocket? That remains to be seen, especially since Facebook are no stranger to trying to move into the news curating market, although so far they’ve not had a great deal of success. I mean, how many of you still (or have ever) used Facebook Paper?

Thank you VentureBeat for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of VentureBeat.