F.lux Coming To Android

There are certain pieces of software you just feel like you need. From using an email client like Outlook, or Office tools like Microsoft Office, there are some things you just have to install when you get a new PC. When it comes to the Office the same can be said, we’ve even written an article regarding the go-to software for remote team collaboration. One of the items on that list was F.lux, a piece of software that I have on a memory stick ready to install on any PC I own at a moments notice, it would seem that PC aren’t the only one to benefit though as it looks like the popular tool is coming to Android soon.

F.lux is simple in its premise. As you use a computer late into the night, the light in your house tends to get dimmer and you are left staring at a screen with no backing light up to the moment when you collapse in bed. F.lux runs in the background of your computer, adjusting your screen colours so that when you come to look away from your screen before sleep you are in “sleep mode”, where your brain is better suited to let you rest and sleep.

F.lux does this by altering information from your GPU, slowly removing blue from your screen, ultimately creating a more red “sunset” kinda appearance on your screen. I have been using f.lux for years now and can safely say that you don’t really notice the difference, except when you want to go to bed.

The problem is that we use so many devices these days, the creators behind f.lux have realised this and currently, if you head over to the forums, you can sign up to the beta program for the app on your phone. Say goodbye to the late nights because you’ve watched that “one more episode” on your phone before wanting to go to bed. Sadly though you will need a rooted device to take part in the beta, so maybe the app isn’t ready for everyone just yet.

This Is Why Strapping a Wi-Fi Connection to a Sniper Rifle Is a Bad Idea

We have come to a point where we embed a lot of technology to weapons, sometimes even too much technology. This is the case of TrackingPoint, a company that makes such smart weapons. One sniper rifle the company produces is so advanced that it would make anyone a pro-marksman when fired. But, as expected for something this advanced, the gun can be hacked.

A group of hackers found a way to hack the sniper rifle via Wi-Fi. Yes, the gun actually has a Wi-Fi antenna that lets you connect and stream its view to other devices. However, the Wi-Fi is off by default. Turning it on, the hackers proved that adjusting some variables can alter the target, so you might be aiming for something, but eventually hitting an entirely different target in the end.

The hack is also very advanced in a way, being able to tap into the ‘root’ permissions of the gun. This means that a hacker can be granted full access to the gun and even lock the user out of it. However, one truly relieving thing is that the gun cannot be fired remotely, requiring manual trigger fire at all times. Hackers can still remove the safety mechanism, so this is still a bit worrying.

From the looks of it, hacking the gun proves to be a challenge. First of all, the Wi-Fi needs to be on, but since most people use sniper rifles in the wilderness and not in their back yard, the likeliness of it being on is next to zero. Even so, the hacker needs to be next to the gun, so as previously mentioned, hiding in a bush with a laptop is also not practical. It might sound next to impossible to hack it, but the hackers tell that malware can be installed on it, so an attacker can somehow hack it at some point and have it targeting or altering stuff at a certain time and place.

All this makes you wonder, doesn’t it? We previously mentioned about machine guns that can target and decide when to shoot and those most likely have Wi-Fi connectivity as well. Once we get to that point where autonomous guns and military machines become more popular, what would happen if someone were to ‘accidentally’ place a malware on one of their networks? Scary, isn’t it? What are your thoughts? Let us know!

Thank you WIRED for providing us with this information

Android Malware Fakes Power-off to Spy on You

The security company AVG has discovered a particular devious little piece of malware in the Android ecosystem, one that seemingly can spy on you while your phone is turned off.

The malware digs into your phone and actually just fakes a power down. You’ll get the animation and the screen as well as LEDs will turn off – exactly the same as if you’d turn your phone off.

Now that you’re completely unaware that the phone is running, the malware can make phone calls, send messages, transfer your files as well as record you through the built-in cameras and microphone. That’s kinda creepy.

The good news is, this malware can only attack rooted phones, so the general public is safe. But even people with rooted phones can be safe from this attack, at least if they use AVG’s security solution. It can both detect and deal with this new threat dubbed the ‘Android/PowerOffHijack.A’ that can attack Android 5.0 and below.

The company spokesperson told that at least 10,000 devices were infected so far, but mostly in China where the malware was first introduced and offered through the local, official app stores.

Thanks to AVG for providing us with this information

Google Glass Hacked By Jay “Saurik” Freeman

What would you do if you were given the opportunity to test out Google Glass, or if you were a developer for Android based apps? Well it appears that developer Jay “Saurik” Freeman, a developer for both Android and iOS apps has decided that he would root his Google Glass. Though it doesn’t appear to be against the terms of use, and I feel that it should be well within the realm of testing for developers. Upon researching this matter I found that Google has implemented a “Kill Switch”. Google has reserved the right to brick/deactivate the device if have given your Google Glass to anyone else. I am not sure how this might work, since I haven’t had the opportunity to test out the product.

“It took me two hours while I was having dinner with friends at the time,” “The implementation from B1nary is for normal Android tablets and phones, I learned how it worked and then did the same thing on Glasswhich was quite simple.” Freeman informed Forbes

Many developers have already started to receive their glasses, and are being able to test them out, with this I have been hearing great things about Google Glass, but I haven’t heard much about rooting the device. The Explorer Edition is more for Beta testing the device, also being able to bring us some of the first apps. Beta testing is designed to get any bugs and kinks out of a system or program prior to public release.

It is unknown yet as to what benefits rooting Google Glass might be, if any at all. Unlike cell phones where rooting will allow you to remove unwanted manufacturers apps, and change other settings, Google Glass will likely have a standard Android Operating system, or we can hope.

 

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