How to Rollback From Windows 10 in a few Clicks

Windows 10 has finally arrived and already accounts for an estimated market share of 0.375%. Microsoft’s figures suggest a staggering 14 million devices were activated within 24 hours of launch. However, Microsoft’s latest and probably last operating system has come under fire due to privacy concerns and users have reported some unnerving bugs. The procedure to revert from Windows 10 is relatively simple, but it must be done within 30 days of your initial upgrade date.

If you decided to perform an upgrade without transferring any files, make sure to back up any data on an external flash drive or optical media. Operating systems are prone to anomalies when using a system restore or reformat so it’s important to have a contingency plan. Once your data has been successful backed up, it’s now time to instigate the rollback from Windows 10.

Firstly, navigate to the Start Menu and click on the Setting tab. This will bring up the traditional Control Panel which contains a number of categorized options.

Click on the Update and security icon to access a new screen with installation commands.

Next, you should be able to see the Update and security menu which contains a host of system tools. On the left, there is a tab entitled, “Recovery”. Click this and the right hand section will display 3 key options. Ensure you select the “Get Started button” underneath the label “Go back to Windows 7/8/8.1”.

Once pressed, Microsoft allows you to cancel the process or offer feedback on the decision to drop Windows 10 from your system. To proceed, you must tick one of the boxes and click next.

After choosing a reason for the rollback, Microsoft asks you to confirm the decision to prevent customers from making any rash decision.

Then, your PC will begin to automatically downgrade from Windows 10 and doesn’t require any user-input. This could take 10-30 minutes depending if you have an SSD or mechanical hard drive. When the procedure is finished, you should be able to log into your previous operating system without any problems.

Please let us know if this guide helped you and your overriding opinions of Windows 10 so far.

Latest Windows 8.1 Update Causing Major Issues

Last week on ‘patch Tuesday’, Microsoft released Windows Updates which instantly started causing issues. Even though this wasn’t the “Update 2” for Windows 8.1 that we’ve been waiting for, this relatively minor change has caused major BSoD issues for many.

We’ve learned that four individual updates are causing these BSoD issues for its users. The biggest culprit being KB2982791, a kernel related driver.

Because of the severity of this issue, Microsoft are encouraging all users experiencing problems to uninstall these updates directly or use Windows Restore to rollback your system. The four culprits are as follows:

  • 2982791 MS14-045: Description of the security update for kernel-mode drivers: August 12, 2014
  • 2970228 Update to support the new currency symbol for the Russian ruble in Windows
  • 2975719 August 2014 update rollup for Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2
  • 2975331 August 2014 update rollup for Windows RT, Windows 8, and Windows Server 2012

These updates can be uninstalled by navigating to your “Programs and Features” section, clicking on “view uninstalled updates” and individually right clicking these updates and clicking uninstall.

As we said previously, it’s KB2982791 that is causing the bulk of the issues. You can choose to remove solely this or all four just to be safe.

What are your thoughts on keeping your operating system updated? Browsing online you can see many conflicting opinions – some proclaiming the benefits of automatic updates and others arguing the issue due to issues such as this.

Image courtesy of Hot Hardware