Research Finds In-Game Usernames Correlated With Anti-Social Behaviour

According to the latest research, it turns out the names we pick in game are a good predictor of how we behave in-game. By looking at the usernames of player in League of Legends, researchers were able to correlate anti-social tendencies in game with both age and the choice of username.

Rating names based on Anti-Social Naming Tendency (ANT) and Age as derived from the username, researchers correlated this data with Riot’s in-game reporting system. Not surprisingly, players with anti-social usernames tended to have more reports and complaints. It also found that younger players tended to have a much higher amount of reports sent and received, well in excess compared tot he amounts for older players.

Players with more neutral usernames tended to receive less reports and were more willing to give out “honor” or a positive report of other players. The same held true for older players who sent out honor 6% more often and received it 2% more frequently.

While we might think of older gamers are those in their late 20 and 30s and even beyond, it turns out that going up to 22-25 years of age was enough to see positive impacts. The researchers chalk up the age differences as due to cognitive development of the young male demographic. The anti-social naming is more self-explanatory, with real world personality being the driver. Interestingly enough, those with anti-social names tended to do very slightly better on average. With more research, it will be interesting to see the interaction between our real world and in-game personalities.

21 Year Old Earned $1000 A Day By Hacking League of Legends

Being a professional gamer is the desire of many young players, especially when they hear that the money involved can be serious, with league jackpots easily peaking at $5m USD as is the case with the upcoming LoL championships, but some people are not content on playing fair and square and earning their keep in legitimate ways. The latter way of making money is how a 21-year old hacker known as Shane ‘Jason’ Duffy rapidly built up his bank balance.

Earning $1000 per day, Duffy exploited a security breach that he found on an employee account of Riot Games, where the employee had not updated and changed their password as requested when a breach was originally discovered. This flaw though lead Duffy to a hackers gold mine – access to an estimated 24.5 million user accounts of LoL players around the world. On top of this he also had access to League of Legends: Supremacy, which he leaked out on to the public net shortly after.

Following the leak of Supremacy he was arrested and his equipment seized in conjunction with the illegal activities. Released on bail, Duffy soon went back to his old ways, offering a service to knock other LoL players out of games in exchange for cash along with the selling of character skins, which in itself made him $200-800 a time.

All of this activity led Duffy to have a massive bank balance, with over 880 transactions being accrued in one month, earning him well over $1000 a day. This second round of hacking soon brought him another meeting with the police, with another round of equipment getting seized, along with $110,000 worth of Bitcoins.

All of this illegal activity has come to bite him back as he now awaits sentencing in a Queensland court for nine separate charges of illegal activity, five of those for fraud with the others including a charge of hacking the Riot Games servers.

To put of this into context; if you want to earn a tidy living through online gaming, you’re better off in joining a gaming clan or team – this will bring you both money and fame in a legal way.

Source: Tweaktown

Riot Brings LoL Season 3 World Championship To The Staples Center On October 4th

Riot Games today unveiled plans for the Season 3 World Championship, the premier event for League of Legends professional esports on a global stage. Beginning 16 September, the best teams from each region around the world will descend on Southern California for a month of intense action, including semi-finals held at the Galen Center, the site of last year’s final. Once the dust settles, competitors will head downtown for the World Championship at the prestigious home of pro sports in Los Angeles – the Staples Center.

Taking place Friday, 4 October, the World Championship will be the pinnacle of pro League of Legends play this year, with the sport’s preeminent athletes battling in front of more than 10,000 live fans, plus millions more online. The winning team will be crowned the Season 3 world champion, walking away with the Summoner’s Cup and $1 million in cash. Tickets go on sale soon at lolesports.com and other associated ticketing outlets.

The road to the finals will not be easy. In the coming weeks, professional teams in each region will play in qualifier events around the world. The top 14 teams from North America, Korea, China, Southeast Asia, Europe, and an international wild-card will then head to Southern California for the World Playoffs. After a group stage and two critical single-elimination rounds, the two remaining teams advance to the Staples Center for an epic showdown.

League of Legends World Championship facts:

  • Every match counts: Top teams from around the world will compete during qualifying events throughout the summer, with regional dominance and a trip to Los Angeles on the line
  • Eyes of the world on LA: With thousands of seats filled and millions of fans watching from home, the World Championship closes out a historic season for professional esports
  • Millions of dollars on the line: October’s $2 million prize pool rounds out the Season 3 total to more than $8 million across the globe
  • Viewership during the inaugural League of Legends All-Star event peaked at over 18 million unique viewers
  • Fans around the world casting more than 50 million votes to determine the event’s star players.

Thank you www.lolesports.com for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Competitive Gamer.