Inside Man Tampered With Random Number Generator to Generate Lottery Results

We’ve recently reported about how a group had managed to track down and exploit a flaw in lottery machines, giving them the ability to print off winning tickets. Now it would seem that investigators have finally managed to track down the methods that Eddie Raymond Tipton, other gentlemen charged with tampering with lottery results, managed to win the lottery on not one but several occasions. It all turned out to be because he was able to act like an inside man and tamper with the random number generator that’s used to select the winning lottery balls.

At the time of the offense, Tipton was the information security director of the multi-state lottery associated. Using this authority he was able to access the random number generator room where he installed several dynamic link libraries (DLLs) to random number generators system. The reason it’s taken so long for the methods used to be determined is because there wasn’t a set pattern, not every result was predictable but as it turns out, some were.

Triggered on three particular days of the year, one at a certain time of a day while the other two were triggered on specific days, the software would then instead of creating random numbers use a provided algorithm, one that Tipton was aware and could calculate the results of.

Hacker Claims He Controlled The Outcome Of Mexico’s Election

We hear stories and watch movies about hackers, from the news that large companies like TalkTalk have their information accessed to hacking lottery terminals, we’ve heard it all. That was until a hacker who’s currently in jail has come forward saying he was even responsible for rigging the outcome of Mexico’s election.

Amongst his claims of controlling the outcome of Mexico’s election, Andrés Sepúlveda, a known hacker currently serving a 10-year sentence in prison for hacking Colombia’s 2014 presidential election, claims he was paid to ensure that Mexico’s Institutional Revolutionary (PRI) candidate won the country’s election back in 2012. Claiming to have hired a team of hackers he states that his team installed malware on the routers at the PRI main opponents headquarters, giving them access to emails, campaign schedules, and speeches before they were even complete.

Sepúlveda claims that using hand-written accounts and 30,000 twitter bots he used the obtained information to adjust the playing field, giving the PRI candidate the upper hand. If that wasn’t enough, Sepúlveda states that they used fake 3am calls from rivals to help dissuade voters on the eve of the election.

Noting that some of the candidates he has helped over the year may not even be aware of his actions or the illegal methods used to obtain their upper hand, Sepúlveda now works on behalf of the government to help “track and disrupt drug cartels” as well as using his twitter skills to identify ISIS recruits on the social media site.

With a full account of his tale, Bloomberg has shared Sepúlveda’s story and have tried to validate what they can, including an anonymous source who “substantially confirmed Sepúlveda’s accounts” regarding the political consultant Juan José Rendón.

Lottery Terminals Hacked To Print Winning Tickets

The lottery is all about odds, from your numbers being picked to choosing to stay with your classic numbers or go for a lucky dip this weekend. It seemed that a group of people didn’t quite want luck to factor in and had in fact hacked lottery terminals in order to print winning tickets.

A group of six people has been charged with the crime in which they worked or owned retail stores that took part in the 5 Card Cash game in Connecticut. The only reason they got caught? They were winning too much.

Typically the state average for winning the lottery was 24 percent, but in one of the stores, there was a 76% chance of winning. They were able to do this by tampering with the terminals used to print lottery tickets and then cash them in. They might not be all of it though as investigators are claiming that “more arrests may be made in the future”.

The Hartford Courant stated the hack worked:

“An investigator for the Connecticut Lottery determined that terminal operators could slow down their lottery machines by requesting a number of database reports or by entering several requests for lottery game tickets. While those reports were being processed, the operator could enter sales for 5 Card Cash tickets. Before the tickets would print, however, the operator could see on a screen if the tickets were instant winners. If tickets were not winners, the operator could cancel the sale before the tickets printed.”

The 5 Card Cash game was cancelled after several months when the lottery officials realised that it came with more winning tickets than the system should have allowed. To this day, the game has remained suspended and looks to remain that way with the revelation of how many people were able to break the system for profit.