Amazon is Creating a Platform to Share Educational Materials

When you are a teacher, or anyone involved in training, you often spend more time creating resources and finding ways to reinforce a message rather than just hammering it home time and time again. In order to help with this Amazon are looking at creating a new site designed around being able to share educational materials around the world.

Amazon Education is still in its early stages but you can now sign up as part of their waitlist for the scheme here. The page states that the “future of education is open”, and with all signs pointing to the scheme working similar to Amazon’s retail site, users will be quickly and comfortably able to share resources around the world.

In recent years companies have made a big push on technologies and Amazon are one of the companies that have pushed the most in this regard. With the Kindle being accepted as a standard for eBooks, being able to share classroom text through kindle’s would save schools hundreds on replacing books and with systems like Whispersync already in place to share materials, Amazon seems keen on getting into the business of educational resource sharing.

Do you think that being able to download and access your textbooks, homework and research topics through a popular platform like Amazon would help schools or would it make them reliant on a technology they have no control over?

Mine An Asteroid and Its Yours – You Just Have to Get There First

We have known for a long while that the resources we have on Earth and under it, are limited. With an expanding population and growing lifespan, it’s becoming more and more necessary to find alternative sources of resources. With a billionaire seeking to mine the moon, we could soon be seeing people launching into space, not for exploration, but to go mining. Its okay, if you can mine it, you can own it according to legislation passed by the US congress.

The US Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act was signed into effect on Tuesday offering a range of pro-business measures for US Citizens that include being able to own resources in outer space. The act also looks to make it easier for commercial groups to get permission to launch craft into space, meaning that going and mining the moon and passing asteroids could become one step closer very soon.

With protection for companies offering space tourism and extending the International Space Stations lifetime to 2024, the act will have long standing effects on anyone and every company that looks to expand their borders to outer space.

There is one problem with any legislation that affects outer space, and if anime and science fiction has told me anything, it’s that no one on Earth can truly own something in space. What if someone in the UK lands on an asteroid and mines it, are they protected under US law? What about the countries that don’t agree to the law and legislations that people believe their actions to be protected by? Not only could you soon see buildings made from asteroids, but the courts could see large legal battles between entire countries for the rights to space rocks.

Will DirectX 12 and Cloud Gaming Be Possible for VR Games?

There have undoubtedly been a lot of attempts in introducing Cloud Gaming in the past. The concept is great and it will really help reduce a lot of computing power on a user’s machine, but failed attempts so far don’t make it practical, so how about adding DirectX 12 and VR to the mix?

Elijah Freeman, Executive Producer at Crytek, told GamingBolt about some interesting ideas of combining all three technologies, and from what I understand, it might just work. Of course, VR requires low latency and high FPS to run the latest games, so optimizations for all titles using the technology should be on the developers’ minds all the time.

DirectX 12 already revealed its power of optimized draw calls and high FPS, so the API should be a must for developers looking to get a lot of ‘fancy’ stuff in their titles and get good frame rates at the end. This is why Crytek believes that combining the cloud, DirectX 12 and VR might just do the trick.

You can’t actually play a fully fledged VR game straight from the cloud, but Crytek believes that using it to simulate complex code which is not required on a user’s PC will greatly increase the performance and free up more resources. They presented such a concept when showing off a lot of explosions being simulated in Crackdown 3 without having a performance drop. You can view the title’s trailer below.

So what do you think? Is DirectX 12 and Cloud Gaming the future for complex VR games? Let us know!

Thank you GamingBolt for providing us with this information

Teaching Resource Site For Minecraft?

Minecraft is a game where very little is ever the same. This means you can build a castle in one map with ease, but in the next building the Starship Enterprise is a lot easier. While attracting to a whole range of audiences, from the young to the creative, Minecraft has developed a large following amongst gamers, but this may soon expand as Microsoft are soon to launch a new website with a different focus.

Minecraft In Education is a plan that hopes to bring the talents that Minecraft reinforces to the classroom, enabling teachers to use the game as a teaching tool.

With the option for schools to purchase licenses for a whole classroom at a reduced price, history lessons could soon take place in Minecraft reconstructions of Egypt, while next door an Electronics class are working together to help fix a circuit. With the option to mod in new features the tool could become limitless, and Microsoft want to reinforce this by giving teachers a place where they can share and discuss their resources, lessons and ideas with others so that everyone can benefit from Minecraft.

Are you a Minecraft player? What do you think about being taught something though Minecraft? Should we be encouraging some of the skills games teach us more often?

Thank you Education Minecraft for the information.

Image courtesy of WallPaperUp.