Orbweb.me Now Also Supported on All Thecus Linux NAS’

It has been a little over half a year since Thecus introduced the support for Orbweb.me on their WSS-based NAS’. That was so successful that the support now has been extended to all of Thecus’ Linux-based NAS’ too. Whether you run the older Thecus OS 5.0 or the recently released Thecus OS 7.0, you can now have easy access to your NAS and everything that’s connected to it from anywhere.

Some might say, I already have access to it all from everywhere, that’s the point of a NAS. But the ease of which you have access to it, how easy it is to use, and the security behind it isn’t always the same. The Orbweb.me application brings a new remote access experience to Thecus Linux NAS from any web browsers such as Chrome, Internet Explorer or Firefox as well as mobile devices powered by iOS and Android.

Orbweb.me is a P2P (Peer To Peer) module that allows users to easily view, stream and manage files in their NAS anytime and anywhere. Best of all, you don’t need to know your IP address and it works well over shared connections too.

Orbweb4.0 offers several features including webcam monitoring with timeline view and snapshot. All these features further increase Thecus NAS functionality. The Orbweb.me application is also available to download for any windows PC in its basic version, but because of the partnership between Thecus and Orbweb, Thecus NAS include a subscription for the Orbweb.me Ultimate Version that otherwise require an annual $69.99 subscription fee.

Thecus NAS uses an arsenal of security protocols and features to maintain user´s data safety. To prevent data from coming under attack when data is being transferred, Orbweb.me uses AES 256-bit encryption to secure all data traffic.

iYogi Accused of Using Scam Tactics

Indian firm iYogi are well-known for their technical support, but recent claims could see their reputation quickly becoming something they wish to hide. A lawsuit could see iYogi paying out thousands if not millions in compensation for what is being described as scam and scare tactics.

Microsoft estimates that nearly 3.3 million Americans lose around $1.5 billion each year due to tech support scams. With these figures it’s no surprise that Brad Smith, Microsoft’s chief legal officer has applauded Washington state’s hard approach on the claims.

While iYogi, who operate over 5,000 employees in call centres based in India, deny the claims the Attorneys General Office has made several large allegations against iYogi. iYogi are said to claim association with Microsoft, Apple and HP, offering support for those companies while also gaining remote access to users systems before asking them to download diagnostic software and flagging up false reports about files, finally offering users the chance to buy everything from yearly support plans and anti-virus software. The claims even state that the company offer to update PC’s to Windows 10 for $80, a service that Microsoft is currently offering for free to Windows 7 and 8 users.

Seeking $2000 in civil penalties per violation of Consumer Protection act and a further $100,000 per violation of the Computer Spyware Act, the bill could quickly shoot up for iYogi.

While it is hard to go off so little information, the claims sound very similar to something I have suffered through many times. A phone call saying that your computer is sending error messages to Microsoft (or Apple) and saying they can walk you through the support process. If this sounds familiar, please read our advice below.

  1. Companies can not track down your personal details from your system, any company attempting to call you claiming to be from Microsoft or Apple is almost certainly not who they claim to me.
  2. Never download software someone tells you to unless you are certain that the person in question only means good for you and only if you know the person, not someone from an email or on the other side of the phone.
  3.  If you do suspect your system is compromised, either by a virus or someone asking you for access, seek help from someone with technical experience such as at a local PC store.
  4. If you feel like a laugh and want to confirm that the person on the other end of the phone is lying to you. When they state they are from Microsoft, tell them that you only own Apple products in that house. If they quickly say that’s what they are there to help fix, you know they are being deceitful.

Do you have any tips for dealing with fake support calls? Tell us your stories in the comments and let’s see if we can’t help someone avoid the pain of paying for “support”.

Is E-Ink The Future of Remote Controlled Traffic Signs?

Wouldn’t it be better to have signs that change themselves when you want to if you live in a city with a lot of traffic or events? Sydney’s State of New South Wales’ Road and Maritime Services seems to agree and started using Visionect’s digital signage to help with all the traffic changes happening around the city.

Sydney is well-known for having a lot of football and cricket matches events, so on those days, drivers are faced with a hectic traffic. Up until now, RMS used to put up and take down different signs to show traffic changes, but since they started using the e-ink signs, they say things just got a lot faster and easier.

The e-ink displays were used for the signs due to the fact that they use a lot less power, so hooking them up to a solar-powered battery wouldn’t be a problem. The signs are also equipped with wireless broadband and can be updated remotely, so you can update and turn them on or off with the press of a button. Now imagine placing them, taking them down and changing them manually… it’s a really great improvement, isn’t it?

For now, RMS rolled out 15 of these signs on George Street in the Sydney CBD and some in Moore Park area. However, the signs are so time and cost efficient that they can almost replace every sign which requires to be changed every now and then to reflect traffic changes. Will this be the future of traffic signs? What do you think?

Thank you The Register for providing us with this information

CRYORIG Presented IoT Enabled PSU

Let’s face it, most new PC hardware is just old shoes in new boxes, with improvements but still basically the same. But once in a while a new product comes along that has a nice twist and in this case it is a power supply.

CRYORIG displayed their newest idea at Computex, an Internet of Things (IoT) enabled power supply. The CRYORIG Pi is only a proof of concept so far and it is working and being demonstrated. The actual line of products is targeted for a release in 2016 with wattage ranging from 600 to +1000 Watts and 80 Plus Gold to Platinum certifications.

Internet of Things is gaining a lot of momentum at the moment and in short, these are smart devices that lets you control their actions from anywhere through remote connections. This is also the case for CRYORIGS new Pi power supply that will allow you to wake or shut your system down remotely thanks to the patent pending Zero Hassle Hardware Wake (ZHH Wake) technology that directly controls your motherboard.

Forgot to shut down your system before you left home, do it from anywhere. Need to boot up your extra file server and access some data from a remote location, no problem. Read in the news that a thunderstorm is closing on your home, shut down the system until it has passed. There are a lot of possibilities with this technology.

From this base CRYORIG’s Pi line can extend further capabilities such as fan speed control, energy usage recording and management, electric bill estimations as well as PSU health and deterioration reporting all directly to a mobile phone app.

This is a pretty cool and innovative idea, let us just hope that it will actually result in a final product and not end up never being released such as Captherms Multiphase cooler we saw at CES two years in a row – but never any actual product.

The Ray Super Remote is the Ultimate Home Remote Control

There have been numerous attempts over the last few decades to create a single, universal remote control with the capacity to interact with every one of your home entertainment devices, with varying results, but the Ray Super Remote may now have cracked it.

The Super Remote, developed by Ray Enterprises, is a touchscreen device that can control your TV, satellite or cable box, DVR, games console, and internet streaming box, like Apple TV or Roku. It can connect to over 200,000 different devices, and can run software to control any home device with an IP address, such as the Nest thermostat.

The interface is fully customisable and the software can learn your habits and preferences to suggest programmes that may appeal to you. Battery life is around ten days, and the charging dock doubles as the remote’s holding tray.

David Skokna, CEO of New York-based Ray Enterprises, offered some insight into the development process of the remote, saying, “As we looked at ways to reimagine TV, it seemed like the remote control needed the most help. We think we have a big opportunity to do something magical.”

The Ray Super Remote is due for release in May or June this year, and will cost $199. www.ray.co is accepting pre-orders now.

Source: Business Insider

3D Printing Quadcopters Drones Could Be Used In Emergency Situations

3D printing and quadcopters are two of the coolest innovations to happen in recent years, one can make virtually anything you want and the other can go virtually anywhere you want, so what if you were to combine the two? Well that’s exactly what one team of Engineers from the Imperial College of London have been working on, flying 3D printer drones.

While there’s still some work and a fair amount of doubt about the 3D printing ideals, which they hope could see the drone print a landing nest in treetops, allowing it a place to land and recharge (most likely via solar power) automatically. However, they still plan to include some form of the printing mechanism which can deploy a sticky foam on dangerous objects, before attaching themselves and lifting that hazard away. This is obviously handy for dangerous cleanup operations that involve hazardous waste, where it would be too dangerous to send in a person.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/DyAvbq8o7xI[/youtube]

Obviously the technology still needs some work, but there are hopes to deploy something similar to help with search-and-rescue scenarios and many other kinds of emergency where parts need to be quickly deployed to difficult places. The technology even has a place in the construction industry as it could be used to repair bridges and other structures.

Thomas J Creedy, a PhD student working on the project at Imperial College London, said in a statement: “This is an exciting first step in the lab’s development of co-operative robotic systems for building structures inspired by the natural world.”

Obviously the technology still needs work and its 3D capabilities are still somewhat 2D, but as a proof of concept the idea certainly has merit. I for one look forward to yet more innovations from the world of 3D printing and quadcopters.

Thank you BBC for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of BBC.