Banking Malware ‘Dridex’ is Back!

We’ve all had that moment, those unwanted pop-ups and advertisements on your computer that make you suddenly realise “I’ve got a virus”. It’s one of the things we tend to think happens to others but it can happen to anybody and with the internet it’s easier and easier to spread malicious software, or malware, around the world. One piece in particular has reappeared, this time targeting your online banking experience.

Dridex has made several appearances before, such as when the NCA estimated its cost to the UK was around £20 million. IBM’s X-force have found a more recent version of the malware and it features a whole new trick up its sleeve. By targeting something known as the DNS (Domain Name Service), instead of getting redirected to your banks website, Dridex will now send you to a fake site. From there, users enter their details believing everything to be okay, only to have then handed over their login details to the malware.

The issue with this is that you can be on the “right” website, the page looks normal, the web address is correct and everything else that makes you trust the site, but suddenly its only when you’ve logged in that you realise there is nothing right about the site.

13 of the U.K’s largest banks have had their websites replicated, which may not seem like many but if you count how many times people check their bank accounts online, even taking a few pounds from each of them could quickly reach millions.

The malware is spread through several ways, one of the most common being a manipulated Office document. As a result we remind our readers that attachments are like candy, never accept them from strangers and if you are not expecting them, be extra careful!

Yahoo Mail Restricting Access If You Use An Ad-Blocker

So remember those days when you waited five minutes to load a video or had to browse through those five tabs to find the one which was playing a video you had no idea even existed? A lot of people still suffer this fate, having their internet traffic and experience trampled on by the online plague of intrusive adverts. To combat this a series of software, often plug-ins to web browsers, was released under the title of ad-blockers. These pieces of software blocked unwanted ad’s and allowed you to whitelist any adverts you did like or even whole sites which you knew you could trust. Companies dislike this approach because they have no control over what adverts are played and therefore, end up losing money, a big name to join the crowd to punish ad-blocker users are Yahoo mail.

As shown in the screenshot above, provided by Portnoyd on the Adblock plus forums, shows the welcome message they got when they tried to access their email and found that Yahoo ‘recommended’ disabling Ad Blocker to continue using the email system, even going so far as to say “Uh oh … We are unable to display Yahoo Mail”. This would be believable, Ad Blocker may accidentally block something if it’s designed in a certain way, the sad part is though the URL states ADBLK _TRAP, clearly showing that the redirect is built to prevent Ad blocker’s users from accessing the site, rather than the error it pretends to be.

Are you a Yahoo Mail user? Have you found this problem? Should companies just accept that we wouldn’t use Ad Blockers if their adverts didn’t disrupt us on a regular basis?

Say Goodbye to Metro Skype App

Microsoft says that the Metro version of Skype is not that popular and it won’t continue with it. All users will be moved over to the Desktop version next month, having the Metro service close on the 7th of July. That’s in less than a month now, so wouldn’t an earlier heads up be nice?

Even so, Microsoft says that it wouldn’t make sense to have two apps delivering the same service on its latest operating system, namely Windows 10, since both Desktop and Metro apps will now open and interact in the same way. They say that while Skype for desktop is made for keyboard and mouse use, it does very well with touch input too.

While Metro Skype will redirect everyone to download the Desktop version of Skype after the 7th of July, Windows RT users will still be able to use the Metro version until upgrading to Windows 10.

We heard that Microsoft is planning on integrating the Skype feature in the latest Windows build, but we don’t know what it will include exactly. ZDNet states that Microsoft is also planning on releasing a dedicated Skype bundle. This means a new and improved Skype Messaging, Phone and Video service will be rolling out in the near future.

The exact release date of the new Skype bundle is not yet clear, but rumour has it that Microsoft plans to make it available to existing Windows 10 users sometime this fall. So what do you want to see in the new version of Skype? Let us know!

Thank you ZDNet for providing us with this information

Pirates Win Latest Virtual ‘War’, Music Website Redirects to The Pirate Bay

There has been a constant war between the record industry and the pirates, which doesn’t seem to come to an end anytime soon. It’s been going back and forth for some time now, having battles being won and lost by both sides almost equally. However, the latest ‘skirmish’ between the two apparently ended up with the pirates winning the ‘battle’ against the music industry.

The latest news points to Argentina and its ‘blockade’, more specifically its attempt to block all internet access to The Pirate Bay website. This comes as a result of the Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers (CAPIF) complaining about music and video piracy through the latter torrent website. Following the complain, all access towards The Pirate Bay was blocked nation-wide. This apparently was not tolerated by the pirates, having the CAPIF website hacked in less than 24h after officials established the blockade.

The hacking attempt apparently was not to deface or take revenge by blocking the CAPIF website as well. The attack has been in a way quite ‘brilliant’, having to transform the CAPIF website into a fully function Pirate Bay proxy. The website then bypassed the nation-wide blockade and redirected users attempting to go onto the CAPIF website towards The Pirate Bay, which is really ironic, since potential customers were then redirected to a website full of multimedia files, having the able to download them completely ‘free’.

The CAPIF website has since then been restored after about 10 hours of ‘serving’ users a variety of torrents. While the hacking was hilarious to some extent, it does send a strong message to officials that pirate activists are not going to take such actions lightly and are able to fight back against the government actions to take down torrent websites.

Thank you Ubergizmo for providing us with this information