Inside Man Tampered With Random Number Generator to Generate Lottery Results

We’ve recently reported about how a group had managed to track down and exploit a flaw in lottery machines, giving them the ability to print off winning tickets. Now it would seem that investigators have finally managed to track down the methods that Eddie Raymond Tipton, other gentlemen charged with tampering with lottery results, managed to win the lottery on not one but several occasions. It all turned out to be because he was able to act like an inside man and tamper with the random number generator that’s used to select the winning lottery balls.

At the time of the offense, Tipton was the information security director of the multi-state lottery associated. Using this authority he was able to access the random number generator room where he installed several dynamic link libraries (DLLs) to random number generators system. The reason it’s taken so long for the methods used to be determined is because there wasn’t a set pattern, not every result was predictable but as it turns out, some were.

Triggered on three particular days of the year, one at a certain time of a day while the other two were triggered on specific days, the software would then instead of creating random numbers use a provided algorithm, one that Tipton was aware and could calculate the results of.

TSA Spent $47,000 on a Random Lane Picker

Governments and companies often contract out work to help create app’s and software to make systems. The problem is that the app’s and software comes at a price, it would now seem that the TSA spent quite a bit on a random lane picker.

It’s being reported that the TSA spent $47,400 on a piece of software that would help TSA staff pick lanes to separate and ease up congestion at Airport terminals, as shown in the video below.

The information comes as part of a freedom of information request revealed by Kevin Burke, revealing a contract with IBM totaling $336,413.59. Included in this documentation was a document relating to “randomizer software”.

The deal could have included more than just the software, with the iPad’s and tablets used for the software possibly also included in the deal. People are hoping this is the case, with the software being considered entry-level programming. The app itself was a random number generator, assigning people to the right or left lane (1 or 2) at airport security.

It’s got to be embarrassing that such a simple piece of software would come at such a high cost, all while governments are being scrutinized for their spending, higher taxes and budget cuts. The app is no longer in use, with the process of being randomly allocated lanes also being removed from their processes.