Anti-Drone Rifle Disables UAVs Up to 400 Metres Away

Drones are one of the latest areas of technology that the public has widely accepted. Ranging from their use at filming sports events from different angles to being used for racing, weapons and more, they are certainly adaptable and dangerous. Two months ago it was revealed that most drones could be disabled with the right sound waves. Now it would seem that a company has taken this idea and created a public sector, anti-drone weapon.

Meet the DroneDefender. Created by Battelle and weighing approximately ten pounds the device is designed to help disable UAV’s and other remote controlled aerial craft from up to 400 metres away. While the military has been keen to develop anti-drone defences, this is the first time that a company has created something for use by the general public for drone defence.

By firing an array of radio waves, specifically tuned to GPS and ISM frequencies the drone is not only disabled but it can’t receive any future commands from its operator. With the possibilities being endless for its deployment, from sports events and public gatherings to buildings like the White house or Parliment.

With drones becoming an everyday purchase, with you being able to walk down to your local shop and grab one or order several different models straight from the web. Being able to stop them when they are clearly being misused is an idea many are welcoming.

https://youtu.be/zX4XXLb_Vuw

Thank you Engadget for the information and image.

Google Reportedly In Development Of Contact Lenses Which Can Read Glucose Levels

A contact lens which contains a glucose sensor, an antenna, a capacitor and a chip has been developed by Google dedicated to people suffering from diabetes. It does not restrict eyesight and performs analysis of glucose twice every second, afterwards send the information gathered to an external monitoring device with the help of radio waves.

Having 1 in 19 people on the planet dealing with diabetes, it can become like a part-time job to manage. Glucose levels change frequently throughout the day and a close eye must be kept on readings at all times through blood drop tests and other methods. The Google team tasked with the project came up with the contact lens idea, which is made out of chips and sensors that look like bits of glitter and an antenna that is thinner than a human hair. They also overcome the battery issue with the help of radio waves, which provides the necessary electrical energy necessary to power up the sensors inside the lens.

It is said that future models may even include a light source built into the lens that would let wearers know the status of their glucose levels without having to look at the external monitoring device, according to project lead Brian Otis, which can be activated via a blinking feature or the user closing his or her eyes.

Google is currently in talks with the FDA, but they say there is still some more work to be done on it until we see one of these lenses on the market.

Thank you Tech Spot for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Tech Spot