Underwear Designed To Protect Your “Crown Jewels” from Phone Radiation?

Technology has a way of scaring people, from the original fears that the TV would create a horde of mindless zombies to the argument that video games promote violence. One of the oldest fears though is with wireless technology, something that is relatively modern in the world, and the effect that it may have on our bodies given how recent its mainstream usage has become. Don’t worry though because a company has come up with some nifty underwear to help protect you from your mobile phone radiation.

Kronjuwelen (translated as “crown jewels”) is the German startup responsible for the underwear in question, a set of clothing designed specifically to protect men’s nether regions from the effects of mobile phones radiations.

The underwear itself is lined with “protective silver threads”, designed to absorb 70 percent of WiFi signals and 98% from your mobile phone. With four different sizes (but sadly only one colour) the underwear comes in at $32. The four co-founders state that they don’t want to “live with these potential risks anymore”, with the disclaimer that they are “neither radiologists, physicists, nor cancer researchers, and we cannot finally determine the risks of mobile phone radiation.”

Better safe than sorry, especially when your future family may be involved seems to be the policy behind these boxers and I’m certain that others will feel the same way. With some studies showing abnormalities in sperm counts following on from exposure to wireless signals (please note there is no scientific consensus on if wireless signals do in fact affect sperm concentrations), some people will sleep better knowing that their future is safe with a silver lining.

Fallout 4 Player Recreates Tenpenny Tower

When it comes to gaming platforms, people have all kinds of preferences, some like just picking up a controller and going rounds after rounds on their TV while others like sitting at their desk and hearing the fans power up the overclocked graphics. One thing I like about playing games on PC’s is the ability to include mods or user-created content. Some people add new content, some people bring back the old, such as one user who recreated the Fallout 3 structure Tenpenny Tower in Fallout 4.

Dubbed Nopenny Tower, the building is modelled after the lovely building stands tall over the barren wasteland of Fallout 3. Courtesy of Imgur user Jondak, you can enjoy the site of Nopenny tower created with only a few mods and console commands.

From watching Batman Vs Superman trailers in GTA V to seeing the entire map of Skyrim come alive in Unreal 4, you really do have to admire some people’s abilities and skills with modding tools.

If you could see one thing recreated within a game what would it be? Would you rebuild a city from an old game or movie, or why not add something different to a game and watch the worlds you play in expand. Share your thoughts in the comments below and let’s see what ideas we can get made!

New Startup Kickstarts Stylish Signal-Blocking Tin Foil Hats

Are you one of the unlucky few who fall victim to government mindreading via invisible microwave beams? Are you spending far too much money on tin foil to protect your brain from being probed, or are you just self-conscious when wearing your ramshackle silver hat in public? Well, good news everybody! A new company based in London is Kickstarting a batch of stylish, signal-blocking tin foil hats, so you won’t have to resort to wrapping your head in foil any more.

Shield Apparel has launched the Shield, described as “signal proof headwear”, suitable for blocking “signals from cell phones, wi-fi routers, microwaves and it generally blocks waves transmitted from electric devices,” according to the Kickstarter campaign.

“We know that we need to say something more about the technology and design to grab your attention and trust, so here we go,” the Kickstarter reads, in some kind of weird, metatextual self-commentary. “To achieve the signal proof quality we use a unique fabric (pure silver) which is antimicrobial, antiodor, washable and was originally produced for military purposes and we put it between the hat’s layers.

“It’s not blocking for 100% percent,” the blurb adds, “but better than nothing.” Better than nothing? Phew! At least it’s not a complete waste of money…

It seems that the Iluminati is probing more minds than previously thought, with 194 backers pledging £10,085 towards the Shield’s £13,000 goal, with 10 days to go. Will you be investing in tin foil hats or is this taking it a bit too far?

Individual Wins Disability Grant After Claiming To Be Allergic To Gadgets

Well you learn something new everyday, a French individual has won a payout for being allergic to gadgets, and yes you read right, not gas but gadgets.

Marine Richard, 39, explained to a court that she is allergic to electromagnetic radiation with is emitted from gadgets. As a result, the ruling states that she may claim €800 (£580) per month for three years. After the ruling, Marine stated that it “is a “breakthrough” for people affected by electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS)

This condition has some validity as WHO, what, yes WHO which stands for the World Health Organization, recognises it as a genuine condition, although as yet the causes are still unclear. As a result, Ms Richard has resorted to living in the mountains of south-west France – in a barn that has no electricity.

The symptoms sound quite severe considering a sufferer is likely to encounter headaches, fatigue, nausea and palpitations. I do feel this is a genuine condition but wonder how you would counteract it, after all, it is pretty impossible to escape these gadgets which include phones, Televisions and even Microwaves which emit electromagnetic waves. I do feel further research is needed to better conclude the health implications of certain devices.

It is a difficult one, if you’re a sufferer and it is recognised then it is not very pleasant, but, is it right to receive £580 pounds a month and call it a disability? Only time will tell.

Thank you bbc for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of mytechportal

New ‘Pregnant Mode’ for Chinese Routers

In today’s society, we are truly immersed in wireless communications; from our tv services to mobile phones. In recent years, a lot of panic has occurred due to the possible negative side effects of wireless transmissions, such as using a mobile phone too much possibly giving you cancer.

Chinese firm Qihoo unveiled a new device that is aimed at the previously baron market of pregnancy safe routers. This comes as an improvement to a previous product originally released and comes equipped with three settings; as listed on its website as Wall Penetration, Balance and the Pregnant Women option.

The third option supposedly decreases the radiation outputted by the device by 70% as they claim. The opposing tech giant Xiaomi has accused the Qihoo firm of scaremongering. “The so-called pregnancy mode is just a marketing tactic. Wi-fi usage is safe, so please rest assured when using it” Xiaomi said in a post on a social media site Weibo.

However, the two firms are rivals, and Xiaomi has very recently launched a new product of their own which offers six terabytes of storage and high speed connections, but does not include this setting.

Would router radiation concern you if you or your partner was pregnant? Would you buy this router based on the new feature? Let us know in the comments!

Thank you to the BBC for providing us with this information

Two Singapore Based Teams Create Heat Cloaking Device

Cloaking devices have always been a subject up for debate, either shape cloaking, thermal cloaking or any other type of cloaking device. Apparently, thermal cloaking has been a subject more people were interested in, and even brought forth from the imaginary realm to the real world.

Two teams based in Singapore have allegedly created two different types of thermal cloaking devices. Scientists have been fiddling with ways to cloak things for some time, and found out that microwaves can be bent easily. From there, light bending and infrared radiation, as well as sound, were the main topic in terms of testing and creating devices for bending the latter and devise cloaking devices.

Based on these studies, the two Singapore research teams applied the study on heat. Although heat is not a wave media such as the ones previously mentioned, they have stated that heat as well can be cloaked under certain circumstances. The idea behind cloaking heat is to create an environment where heat diffusion does not occur into an object placed into that environment. Instead, like wave cloaking, the heat is caused to stray from its normal path and move around the object instead of into it.

The first team created a heat cloak by binding strips of metal and polystyrene together and then placing the result inside of a block made of thermal conducting material. The arrangement allowed for thermal cloaking of an aluminium cylinder placed inside. The second team created their device by trapping a pocket of air inside a block made of stainless steel, having the air pocket was lined with copper. An object placed inside the air pocket was heat cloaked.

Both teams do not currently have a specific application in mind for their heat cloaking device, but suggest heat cloaking might be useful for managing heat in electronic circuits. One such application might be inside of cell phones as way to prevent batteries from overheating.

Thank you Phys.org for providing us with this information