AMD 300 Series GPU Pricing Leaked

With the launch of AMD’s Radeon 300 series GPU imminent, some pricing and specification details have leaked out. Sweclockers was able to find a leak detailing the pricing for a large number of 300 series GPU. Somewhat unexpectedly, the prices quoted by Sweclockers are a bit higher than the prices the original chips launched at. However, once we take away the VAT which is 25% in Sweden, the prices are much more reasonable, especially once you consider the current street price. The table below is after conversion from SEK to USD and with VAT subtracted.

At $480 the 390X is about $65 cheaper than the 290X was at launch a few years. It’s still about $100 more than the current street price for some 290X models, but once you consider the 8GB of VRAM, it’s about right for 290X 8GB. The same is true of the 390 as it’s nearly $100 more than the 290, but it does come with an extra 4GB of VRAM. Moving onto Tonga, the two R9 380 variants are priced competitively considering their VRAM endowment. The R9 370 4GB is interesting as it’ll be rare that it can make use of that extra 2GB of VRAM though the 2GB model is priced decently. Bonaire is pretty much where we expect to be.

Overall, pricing isn’t all that novel, with AMD preferring to slot in their new series into the current pricing market. Deal hunters will be disappointed as it’s unveiled that there won’t be any revolutionary changes in card pricing this generation. With only a short period till the real launch of the cards, those looking to buy soon are well advised to wait, either to pick up cheap last gen cards or snag a new one. Whether or not this will be enough to help AMD start growing market share remains to be seen. As this is an unconfirmed leak, it’s best to take the pricing with a grain of salt but the data largely checks in.

PowerColor Announce a ‘High-End’ Graphics Card Competition

The release of the highly anticipated R9 300 series is so close it’s almost unbearable to think of; yet one company have jumped the gun and have announced a competition for one of the newest, high-end not yet announced graphics card:

“(One (1) for Grand Prize winner consisting in 2 High end not yet announced graphic cards will be awarded)”

That’s the closest we get to any written information regarding the graphics cards; however, the image on the promotional page does give a little more information. In the background, we see the cooling shroud from a R9 295×2, or could it be the cooling shroud of the R9 390x or maybe even the R9 395×2 (if there would be such a card). This indicates that the card could be water cooled, or maybe it is just PowerColor using an already known high-end graphics card just to cement the ‘high-end’ prize. Across the middle, there is a lighting bar. It is unclear whether this is counting down until the release or the cards or the end of the competition or if it is just there for show?

If you want to enter this competition, why not go over to the PowerColor event page and give them a like on FaceBook.

AMD R9 300 Series of Cards is Full of Surprises

We’ve had quite a few leaks and rumours for some time when it comes to AMD’s new Radeon R9 300 series graphics cards, ranging all the way back to the first possible cooler shroud that could be a hybrid cooling system. But now sources tell TweakTown that AMD’s newest generation of graphics cards won’t arrive as they are portrayed in the current rumours and leaks.

The source didn’t want to go into too much detail when talking to our friends at TT, but did say that “the new Radeon R9 390X will arrive with specifications and possibly features that are different to what the rumors currently suggest.” The most interesting part of the source’s comment is that the new HBM1 memory will actually provide the performance in real-life as it does on paper. If that is true, then Nvidia could be in some serious trouble down the road – at least until they can adapt their own processes and parts to match.

To summarize HBM, the first version to be released will have around 640GB/s bandwidth and the second generation will double that up to 1.2TB/s. Current cards provide an average of 300GB/s bandwidth, so even the first generation of HBM will double that.

There hasn’t really been much change on the memory side of graphics since the introduction of GDDR5 memory, so I can see how this could become a game changer and it’s hopefully something that will get AMD back on track so we see some more competition on the market. Competition is the best thing for us as consumers as it results in more effort in the R&D department as well as lower prices.

Thank you TweakTown for providing us with this information.