PC Specialist Vanquish 270X System Review

Introduction


Intel’s Pentium G3258 Anniversary Edition CPU release has been very exciting for the PC market, the main reason is that you can now get high-end desktop performance for the price of an entry level system. This is because the bulk of applications and games are still largely dependent on the performance of 1-2 CPU cores, so with the potential to get around 4.5-4.8GHz on both its cores the Pentium G3258 can offer Core i7 4790K-like performance in one to two threaded applications. Today we are testing PC Specialist’s Vanquish 270X system which they have configured and built especially for us! This system features a Pentium G3258 CPU overclocked to a whopping 4.7GHz and that’s paired up with a Powercolor R9 270X 2GB graphics card and 8GB of RAM. All in all this means there is more than enough grunt in this system to drive all the latest gaming titles maxed out at full 1080p or even as high as 1440p depending on the game, as well as to do a wide variety of other productivity and home tasks. What’s even more impressive is that the components used are really cost effective, so this build comes in at just £579! PC Specialist have made very sensible component choices to keep the pricing in that sweet spot zone: they’ve opted for the unlocked Pentium, AMD’s R9 270X, an SSHD, Gigabyte’s entry level Z97 gaming series motherboard and Corsair’s affordable 230T chassis houses it all. Below you can see the full specifications of this build:

Specifications

  • Name: PC Specialist Vanquish 270X
  • Case: Corsair 230T with Red LEDs and Side Window
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte Z97X Gaming 3
  • Processor: Intel Pentium G3258 “Anniversary Edition” Dual Core at up to 4.7GHz w/ OC
  • Processor Cooler: Titan Universal CPU Cooler with Arctic MX4 thermal paste
  • System Memory: 1 x 8GB DDR3 Kingston HyperX Beast 2133MHz
  • Main Boot Drive: Seagate 1TB Hybrid Solid State Hard Drive with 8GB SSD Cache
  • Additional Storage Drive(s): Not included
  • Graphics card: Powercolor AMD R9 270X 2GB
  • Power Supply: Corsair VS 450W
  • Optical DriveSuper WriteMaster DVD RW
  • Wireless: Not included
  • Monitor: Not included
  • Peripherals: Not included
  • OS: Windows 8.1 64 Bit
  • Warranty: 3 Year Warranty (1 month collect & return, 1 year parts, 3 year labour)
  • Price: £579 (accurate at the time of writing)

Packaging & Accessories

PC Specialist’s Vanquish 270X system comes very well packaged with soft cell foam to absorb shock and vibration in transit as well as some protective plastic to prevent dust and scratches.

In terms of accessories you get PC Specialist’s welcome pack which has all the additional manuals and documentation that came with all the components in your system. There’s also a welcome guide written by PC Specialist that they advise you to read before using your new PC.

CPU-Z

Jumping into CPU-Z and we can see that as promised our Pentium G3258 (which CPU-Z is mistakenly reading as the Pentium G3420) is clocked at 4.7GHz using 1.35 volts. This core voltage is a little high for 24/7 operation, I maybe would have preferred to see 1.3 volts and a slightly lower clock speed.

The memory is just a single DIMM so we have to use single channel mode, that memory is clocked at 2133MHz.

GPU-Z

On the GPU side we have Powercolor’s R9 270X which comes clocked fairly high and has bags of overclocking headroom if you want to push things further.

AMD R9 280X, R9 280 and R9 270X Price Cuts Come Into Effect

We heard last week that AMD would be slashing prices on its mid-range GPUs to make way for its new Tonga GPU and now this has started to come into effect. AMD is lowering the pricing of the R9 280X and everything below it in their product stack. The first vendor to implement the price cuts is HIS who have been price cutting on their R9 and R7 series graphics cards. On Newegg HIS have knocked off $20 from the price of their R9 280 and R9 280X graphics cards and in Europe they have done something similar with many R7 series graphics cards. Other manufacturers are expected to follow suit in the coming week or so. The price cuts should see the R9 280X drop to around $280 and the R9 280 to around $230. We also believe the other cards below will get assigned new MSRPs. The R9 270X should drop in price to around $180, the R9 270 to around $160 and so on. A few examples of these price cuts are as follows:

  • Sapphire R9 280 – $220
  • HIS R9 280 – $220
  • VisionTek R9 270X – $180
  • MSI R9 270X – $180

The new round of price cuts should leave a sizeable gap between the R9 280X ($280) and the R9 290 ($400) which gives AMD room to slot in their new Tonga based graphics card. Based on the price gap AMD is leaving we should expect it to MSRP around $350.

Source: WCCFTech

Image courtesy of AMD

 

AMD 14.11 Beta Driver Gets Released To The Press, First Impressions Revealed

Reports are that AMD has finally released the Catalyst 14.1 beta to the press. The driver is said to bring along the first release of Mantle, AMD’s ambitious 3D graphics API to rival Direct3D and OpenGL. The Catalyst 14.1 beta is said to enable the 3D renderer option in Battlefield 4, which lets you choose between DirectX 11.1 and Mantle.

TechPowerUp apparently gave it a try and they reported that the first ‘impressions’ about AMD’s mantle were nothing close to amazing. The difference between Mantle and non-Mantle systems is currently not noticeable on a Radeon R9 290 graphics card, having all settings set to 1920 x 1080 resolution, Ultra details and 4x MSAA on Battlefield 4. It is reported that the game runs smooth and well over 60 on both Mantle and non-Mantle settings. However, TechPowerUp point out that owners of a Radeon R9 270X will see a significant increase having the same settings applied, whereas on non-Mantle specs, the game’s FPS would drop below 60 FPS. Also, the driver is reported not to be optimized for any of the Graphics CoreNext (GCN) based GPUs other than Radeon R9 290 series, R9 260X, and A-Series “Kaveri” APUs.

TechPowerUp’s specs were as following: 8 GB of DCh DDR3-1333 memory, an AMD 990FX motherboard (ASUS M5A99FX-PRO R2.0, 2201 BIOS, UEFI mode); Windows 8.1 64-bit, and of course, a Radeon R9 290 (BIOS: 015.042.000.000.003747). The game settings are said to be 1920 x 1080 pixels resolution, disabled V-Sync, “Ultra” preset, HBAO, and 4x MSAA. We used the “PerfOverlay.FrameFileLogEnable 1” console command to spit out CSV files with frame-times in ms.

A 167-second playthrough on the single-player campaign chapter “Fishing in Baku,” was performed with the above specs, first being a non-Mantle test. An average frame-time of 16.26 ms, which works out to 61.5 fps. For Mantle, the same 167-second mark was performed, and the average frame-time was 14.45 ms, which works out to 69.2 fps. Overall, a 12.5 percent performance uplift was recorded. It is not much, but given the driver is still a Beta and still not optimized for anything other than the R9 290 series and R29X (if the optimization is final for those as well), we can see the 319% increase stated by AMD in the future.

Thank you TechPowerUp for providing us with this information

HIS R9 270X IceQ X² Turbo Boost 2GB Graphics Card Review

Introduction


We have yet another R9 270X graphics card on the test bench for review today as we take a look at a second HIS graphics card in quick succession. This HIS R9 270X IceQ X² Turbo Boost 2GB graphics card we have here today comes with the same IceQ X² cooler we saw on the HIS R9 280X iPower IceQ X² Turbo Boost 3GB graphics card that we reviewed a few weeks ago, if that’s anything to go by then this graphics card will have impressive cooling performance. For those of you who are yet to read our AMD R9 270X review we encourage you to do that because today we are not reviewing the R9 270X per sé, but instead what HIS have done with their version of it. AMD’s R9 270X has a stock clock of 1050MHz core and 1400MHz memory, HIS have bumped that up to 1140MHz core and 1400MHz memory making it the highest clocked R9 270X we’ve tested so far.

The particular version of this card that we received was simply a card inside a plain HIS digital box. It came with just a DVI to VGA adapter but of course the full retail package for this will have different packaging and a wider range of accessories which are clearly listed on the product page here.

Powercolor R9 270X PCS+ 2GB Graphics Card Review

Introduction


AMD graphics card partners seem to be churning out R9 270(X) GPUs like there’s no tomorrow and today we’ve got another one to put onto the test bench. Powercolor are the provider this time and they’ve sent us their R9 270X PCS+ overclocked graphics card for review. As the name suggests this graphics card uses Powercolor’s PCS+ cooling solution which consists of two 90mm fans with their new double blade fan design and three heat pipes (Two 8mm and One 6mm), that’s all encased in a red and black themed metal shroud with a black metal backplate. Powercolor have also done some work with overclocking taking this GPU to 1060MHz core and 1100MHz boost (up from 1050MHz reference clocks) as well as bumping the memory up to 1425MHz (5700MHz effective) from 1400MHz (5600MHz effective) reference. Other than that there really isn’t much else to point out that you can’t discover from reading our launch day review of AMD’s R9 270X.

There is one last thing that Powercolor wanted us to show you, the readers, and that’s their new Turbo Timer module that is compatible with this graphics card. 

The Turbo Timer module is an optional extra for compatible Powercolor graphics cards, currently just this card and a R7 260X sold by Dataland (Powercolor’s Chinese equivalent) are supported. The Turbo Timer itself is essentially a fan delay device and it ensures that the fans on the graphics card keeps running after shut-down to ensure the graphics card is properly cooled off.

The optional extra isn’t commercially available just yet so we have no idea how much it will cost. However, we can imagine the cost will be pretty small, probably under $10/£10, maybe even less.

As far as I know the Turbo Timer comes with a built in battery to allow it to spin even if the system is unplugged at the wall. While I think the idea is novel, the implementation is impractical and not that useful, I have a few issues with it. Firstly, when a graphics card is shut down it is unlikely to be running hot enough to need further cooling, and after shutdown it instantly stops producing heat so it could never get hotter than the temperature it was at prior to shutdown – meaning the temperature couldn’t be dangerous. Why do graphics cards instantly shutdown if they overheat? Because that’s the most effective way to drastically reduce heat output and prevent damage. Secondly, the module is going to be an optional purchase so you have to pay more for what is a basic and unnecessary feature – it should be included in the price. Thirdly, it is pretty big and bulky for what it does. I would of liked to see the functionality embedded onto the PCB and discretely hidden away, the Turbo Timer module just makes the graphics card unnecessarily wide at the back and it could easily conflict with other PCI(e) cards.

Now onto the main product itself and first the packaging. The Powercolor R9 270X PCS+ comes in a rather plain black & red box with a pretty basic accessory set: you get a driver disc, user’s guide and DVI to VGA adapter.

The back details all the product’s key features but to see them in more detail you can check the product page over on the Powercolor website.

Battlefield 4 Graphics Performance Overview With Current Generation GPUs

Introduction


Battlefield 4 has been one of the biggest game releases so far this year for gamers on all gaming platforms. The FPS title from EA and DICE has got off to a relatively shaky start with numerous audio, graphical and gameplay problems across the various platforms it was released on. In fact for many Battlefield 4 owners the game is still in a dysfunctional or buggy state, but you can expect (or hope) that EA and DICE will begin to patch and fix the majority of the problems within the coming weeks as they have said they will. The shaky launch aside, what most PC owners/gamers want to know, if they haven’t already found out, is how do current generation GPUs perform in Battlefield 4 on the PC?

Today we put that question to the test with an extensive, albeit not entirely complete, range of current generation AMD and Nvidia GPUs. On the AMD side we have the R7 260X, R9 270, R9 270X, R9 280X, R9 290 and R9 290X while on the Nvidia side we have a few more offerings with the GTX 650 Ti Boost, GTX 660, GTX 760, GTX 770, GTX 780, GTX 780 Ti and GTX Titan. All of the aforementioned graphics cards are current offerings and to the sharp-minded readers you will notice some graphics cards are missing. Mainly the current generation lower-end graphics cards from both AMD and Nvidia are absent, that includes the Nvidia GTX 650, GT 640 GDDR5, GT 640 DDR3 and the AMD R7 250 and R7 240. The main reason for not testing these graphics cards, other than that we didn’t have most of them, is because they simply aren’t that capable of running such a high end gaming title. Of course that’s not to say they can’t but given the nature of the resolutions we test (mainly 1080p or above) and the quality settings our readers like to see (very high or ultra) these GPUs simply aren’t cut out for the test. Arguably they are more aimed at gamers with 1366 x 768 monitors tackling medium-high details but I digress. The system requirements for Battlefield 4 reveal a similar picture, if you want a smooth gameplay experience then you need an AMD Radeon HD 7870 or Nvidia GTX 660 or better. However, those system requirements show you very little about what you can expect at different resolutions.  So without any further ado let us show you our results and show you exactly how AMD and Nvidia’s offerings stack up!

ASUS Radeon R9 270X Direct CU II TOP 2GB Graphics Card Review

Introduction


We’ve already seen and reviewed AMD’s reference R9 270X, be sure to check that review out here, but today we have a variant from an AMD partner – more specifically the ASUS Radeon R9 270X Direct CU II TOP 2GB graphics card. The Direct CU II TOP version is based on the best speed binned R9 270X GPUs ASUS could get, they are then overclocked a pretty significant amount and given the ASUS Direct CU II cooling treatment. ASUS claim to be 20% cooler and 3X quieter than the reference design with DIGI+ Syper Alloy VRM components that have 30% less power noise and 2.5X longer lifespan than reference components. The cooler itself uses three large 8mm heatpipes and a pair of 80mm fans to dissipate heat over a dense aluminium heatsink. Given the reputation of the ASUS Direct CU II implementation we can expect it to be a pretty cool and quiet running graphics card while the TOP aspect should see it perform much better than a normal R9 270X, and even overclock a bit further than normal GPUs would.

Out of the box there is a 70MHz boost to the core clock though the memory clock remains the same as reference . ASUS have also tweaked things we can’t see such as adding an additional power phase to the GPU power controls taking it from 5+2 to 6+2. ASUS also use better power componentry that has 80mv less ripple, allowing for more stable overclocks, and higher efficiency, lowering power consumptions and reducing heat wastage.

The box points out all the key features of the product including the GPU Tweak software which ASUS is really trying to push with its video cards.

The back has a more detailed explanation of the key aspects about the card. Included with card is a software utility and driver CD, a speed setup guide, dual molex to 6 pin adapter and a CrossFire X bridge.

Gigabyte Radeon R9 270X WindForce OC 2GB Graphics Card Review

Introduction


Another day and another graphics card review. We are again covering the AMD R9 270X after having already reviewed the AMD reference card which you can see here and the ASUS Direct CU II TOP version which you can see here. The next in line for review is a variant from Gigabyte and more specifically the Gigabyte R9 270X WindForce OC 2GB graphics card. This uses Gigabyte’s acclaimed WindForce cooling solution with a trio of 75mm fans and an array of copper heat pipes. It also packs a modest 50MHz core overclock out of the box to give you an extra boost in performance. In true Gigabyte fashion they are also going to be targeting a particularly aggressive price point with this card – offering one of the cheapest R9 270X graphics cards on the market and with a custom cooler and factory overclock! The main selling point for Gigabyte is the use of their “Ultra Durable VGA Board” package which essentially means better quality components such as a double inner layer copper PCB, reduced voltage ripple and reduced circuit impedance for a better and more stable GPU.

The version we received from Gigabyte was a press sample so came in a plain Gigabyte box.

Inside the box was just the card and nothing else, a retail version would of course have an accessory bundle.

Nvidia Cut GTX 660 And GTX 650 Ti Prices In Response To AMD Launches

If you’re wondering why AMD’s R7 260X received such lacklustre reception both here at eTeknix and at many other review sites, well it is down to the fact that Nvidia have aggressively cut the prices of their cards which compete with the R7 260X – namely the GTX 650 Ti Boost but also to an extent the GTX 660.

Anandtech reports that the GTX 660 has been given a price cut from $200 MSRP to $179 meaning it can better compete with the R9 270X and the R7 260X by sitting in the middle of the two. Next the GTX 650 Ti Boost 1GB has been cut to $129 and the GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB has been cut to $149. This means Nvidia now has the GTX 650 Ti Boost available for cheaper than the AMD R7 260X, which costs $139, if you need less VRAM and only $10 more if you need 2GB of VRAM. Of course the GTX 650 Ti Boost is clearly a better card and these price cuts have made AMD’s R7 260X even more obsolete as our review showed.

If you were hoping for price cuts on other cards then you will disappointed. Nvidia thinks its GTX 760, GTX 770 and GTX 780 graphics cards are all priced competitively enough to compete at $249, $399 and $649 respectively – I would be inclined to agree with them and I think Nvidia’s line up is still very strong indeed. Though AMD’s new R9 280X does put some serious pressure on Nvidia’s GTX 770 which costs $100 more without delivering much more performance while the $199 R9 270X is capable of keeping pace with the $50 more expensive GTX 760.

Image courtesy of Nvidia

AMD Radeon R9 280X, R9 270X, R7 260X, R7 250 and R7 240 Launch Details

Introduction


Launch day is finally among us for AMD’s hotly anticipated RX 2XX series. Today AMD unveils the R9 280X, R9 270X, R7 260X, R7 250 and R7 240. That’s two cards from the enthusiast R9 series, shown above, and three from the entry R7 series, shown below. We’ve already got reviews ready for you to read of the R9 280X, R9 270X and R7 260X so be sure to click those links and check those out.

All the cards you see here today aren’t strictly new but are based on technology from the HD 7000 series. The only hardware difference is we’ve got higher performance from raised clocks and that is at lower price points. AMD have also introduced an updated feature set that includes Direct X 11.2 support, OpenGL 4.3 support, support for AMD’s new low-level Mantle API, improved audio with AMD TrueAudio and improved Eyefinity compatibility for Eyefinity 6 off most cards. This is only just the scratching the surface though so read on as we detail more about AMD’s new launches.

AMD Radeon R9 270X 2GB Graphics Card Review

Introduction


As you may already know AMD’s new series of graphics cards are officially launched today and we have here for you the AMD Radeon R9 270X review, but we’ve also checked out the R9 280X and R7 260X of which you can see reviews of both on our site’s main homepage, or by searching in the search bar if you’re reading this some time after publication. We have managed to get our hands on a reference AMD R9 270X, a card which is essentially an overclocked HD 7870 brought to market at a lower price point than the HD 7870 originally was.

The specifications can be seen below and a clock speed of 1050MHz on the core and 5600MHz on the memory is a fair bit higher than the 1000MHz and 4800MHz the AMD HD 7870 offered. The higher clock speeds mean the R9 270X is capable of 2.69 TFLOPS over the 2.56 TFLOPS offered by the HD 7870. Like with all new AMD RX-2XX series graphics cards there is Direct X 11.2 support, OpenGL 4.3 support and support for AMD’s new API mantle. AMD have opted for a price point of $199 MSRP for the R9 270X meaning it is actually priced roughly the same as the HD 7870 currently is (the HD 7870 is currently priced to clear so stocks won’t last long) but when the HD 7870 originally came to market it retailed for $349 – so this is $149 cheaper.

The R9 270X we received from AMD was a stock card. As such it comes with the stock clocks of 1050MHz core and 1400MHz (5600MHz effective) memory. There is 2GB of GDDR5 across a 256 bit interface but 4GB versions will be made available by some select AMD partners. Since our R9 270X was a retail OEM unit it came with nothing other than the graphics card in an anti-static bag so we have no accessories or packaging to show you. The AMD Radeon R9 270X is designed to compete with Nvidia’s $200~ offerings which currently consists of the GTX 760 ($249) and the GTX 660 ($180-200) but Nvidia are expected to add a few new models later on this year to combat AMD’s new launches. Without any further ado let us proceed in taking a look at the AMD Radeon R9 270X.

MSI R9 280X Gaming And R9 270X Hawk Graphics Cards Pictured

On its German Facebook Page MSI recently showed off pictures of two upcoming cards which will be part of AMD’s new R9 2XX series. VideoCardz claims that these are the R9 280X Gaming at the front, and the R9 270X HAWK at the back. According to VideoCardz The MSI R9 270X Hawk has 2GB of memory, a $199 price, the Curacao XT GPU (Pitcairn renamed) and a 256 bit interface.

The MSI R9 280X Gaming GPU is based on AMD’s old HD 7970. VideoCardz say it features the same clocks as the HD 7970 GHz Edition graphics card on the core and turbo but features a slightly slower 5.5GHz on the memory, compared to 6GHz on the HD 7970 GHz.  Both cards are using MSI’s dual 10cm Twin Frozr IV cooler that makes use of MSI’s propeller blade technology. Military Class 4 components are also equipped. On the MSI R9 280X there are apparently two 8 pins and a TDP of 253W with two mini-DP, HDMI and DVI-I outputs.

Image courtesy of MSI (Facebook)

Rumour: Radeon R9 280X, R9 270X and R7 260X Launching On October 8th

VideoCardz reports that the NDA of the AMD R9 280X, pictured above, lifts on October 8th meaning we should see reviews published on that day next week. Apparently AMD will also allow after-market cooling solution based cards to be shown a few days later – ensuring that the launch is reserved for the AMD cards only. The embargo date for the AMD R9 270X and R7 260X is apparently also October the 8th according to TechPowerUp. Reviews for those are expected to go live on the same day and all three cards are reported to have both reference and non-reference models available.

VideoCardz also cited Chinese sources stating that a mysterious announcement from AMD is happening between October 12th and 20th in Beijing, China. It is supposedly going to be the official showcase of the R9 and R7 graphics cards from China’s main AMD graphics card vendors – Onda, Sapphire, PowerColor, HIS Digital, XFX or Unika.

Image courtesy of AMD

Nvidia Preparing Two Sub-$250 SKUs And Price Cuts For GTX 700 Series

Digitimes reports that Nvidia is planning new GPUs and price cuts in its GTX 700 series to combat the launch of AMD’s R9 and R7 series of graphics cards. Firstly Nvidia is expected to provide price cuts across the whole range of GTX 700 series GPUs in order to compete with the new AMD graphics cards. Secondly, Nvidia is expected to released 1 to 2 new GPUs to defend the USD $149-249 market segment according to industry sources. That potentially means two new cards below the GTX 760 which comes in at around $249.

“The R7 250 is priced below US$89, the R7 260X is US$139, the R9 270X US$199 and the R9 280X US$299. The highest-end R9 290X is also expected to be at a competitive price point.”

The report also states that AMD’s highly competitive pricing should see them regain market share, that’s if Nvidia doesn’t respond well enough to prevent consumers jumping ship to AMD. AMD’s Matt Skynner believes AMD can regain 50% share in the graphics card market.

Image courtesy of eTeknix

Rumour: Radeon R9 270X Is Faster Than Radeon HD 7870 Tahiti LE

AMD’s Radeon R9 270X will be based on a higher-clocked Tahiti LE HD 7870 GPU according to sources on the Overclockers UK forums, via TechPowerUp. The author of the comments has since redacted all information on the forums (probably due to getting a telling off by AMD) but the details of what was said made for interesting reading and have been republished by various sources.

The R9 270X will use the Tahiti LE GPU but with either higher clock speeds or more stream processors. The original HD 7870 was of course based on Pitcairn but a later version based on Tahiti LE (a cut down HD 7950) was released. It features a narrowed 256 bit GDDR5 memory bus in a more compact package.

The OCUK source (which has now been redacted) states clearly that the R9 270X is based on “a crippled HD 7950” which could indicate a GCN core count of 1792 with the relevant tweaks to ensure it performs well enough (but not too well) within its price segment of $199. More details are expected to emerge when the card is launched.

Image courtesy of AMD

AMD Details Improved 4K Support For RX 2XX Series GPUs

AMD has revealed at its GPU 14 LiveStream event that the new RX 2XX series will bring improved compatibility and support for 4K monitors.

AMD claims that in most cases there will be “out of the box” compatibility for 4K monitors with their new series of GPUs.

The new drivers for the AMD RX 2XX series will come with hardware level support for new 4K monitors. The RX 2XX series will also implement a new AMD proposed VESA standard that automatically stitches the two separate panels on a 4K monitor (as most 60Hz 4K monitors are formed from two 2K panels stitched together as current generation display controllers cannot run a single 4K display at 60Hz natively so two are required with two separate panels).

Images courtesy of eTeknix via AMD LiveStream

AMD Announce R9 2XX And R7 2XX Series Graphics Cards

At the GPU 14 event (which you can watch live coverage of here) AMD announced its newest series of graphics cards with the R9 290X, R9 280X and R9 270X all forming the R9 series and the R7 260X and R7 250 forming the R7 series.

AMD briefly details the amount of GDDR5 memory, the price point and the estimated 3DMark Firestrike score of all the new GPUs.

However, the star of the show is AMD’s Radeon R9 290X – the newest addition to the AMD Graphics card family based off a brand new GCN 2.0 architecture. This beast from AMD is revealed but sadly very few details have been disclosed so far. We will of course bring you those A.S.A.P, if AMD reveal them, as we continue our coverage.

Images courtesy of eTeknix via AMD LiveStream

HIS Website Leaks Details Of Upcoming AMD GPUs

The guys over at WCCFTech have managed to grab some details of AMD’s upcoming Volcanic Islands GPU family via the HIS website. We tried to explain the new GPU naming system a while back but now we can bring you the exact naming of these new graphics cards from AMD. The new naming system will be as follows:

  • AMD R9-290 (Replacing HD 7990 Flagship)
  • AMD R9-280 (Replacing HD 7900 Series)
  • AMD R9-270 (Replacing HD 7800/7700 Series)
  • AMD R7-260 (Replacing HD 7770 Series)
  • AMD R7-250 (Replacing HD 7700 Series)
  • AMD R7-240 (Replacing HD 7600 Series)

Based on currently available information the new graphics card line up is believed to look something like this:

Apparently the majority of the graphics cards from the new R-200 series are to be refreshed or rebadged versions of current AMD HD 7000 series graphics cards. These include the R9-270X and below. As you can see from the above table, if this is true, then AMD have knocked to HD 7970 (Tahiti XT) down 3 places in the product stack essentially meaning the HD 7850’s successor is a HD 7970. Nvidia’s rebranding exercise only saw products knocked down by a single place in the product stack, as the GTX 680 became the GTX 770.

AMD’s Hawaii GPU will be for the top three fastest single GPU cards while Vesuvius/Tonga will be the dual GPU graphics card to replace the HD 7990. This will probably be based on a pair of Hawaii GPUs.

WCCFTech also noted that the HIS 280X iPower IceQ X² graphics card was listed with the following specifications:

  • 3GB GDDR5 VRAM
  • 384 Bit interface
  •  Dual LinkDVI-I/HDMI/2xMini DP

The R9-280X is said to be based on the Hawaii XT GPU.

Check out more details right here.

Image courtesy of WCCFTech