New Service Lets You Test Whether Your VPN Leaks

Millions of users around the world use VPN or proxy services to hide their real location. This can be for a multitude of reasons, may it be to stay anonymous while downloading torrents or to get around geoblocking restrictions, legal or illegal. But users should be aware that the services might not be as secure as thought and that they still could leak their information in several ways. A new service, fittingly named ‘Do I Leak?’, sets out to give you peace of mind by letting you test whether your secure connection actually is secure or whether it is leaking information.

There can be two reasons why your VPN or proxy leaks your location or at the very least reveals that you’re trying to hide it: Either the service you are using isn’t as secure as advertised or you have missed a thing or two in your setup. Especially torrent users need to take a closer look at their settings and disable features such as DHT and PEX in order to fully stay anonymous behind their tunneled connection, otherwise, your real IP might still be visible to everyone.

While services to check these things have been around for a while, none of them have been very complete and most of them fail to take every point of leak into consideration. The new Do I Leak service aims to remedy this by added all the individual tests into a simple package that is easy for any user to deploy. On of the most notable differences to other services is the included torrent check for both HTTP and UDP trackers. UDP is one of those things that often is missed by most of these tools. It will also check whether your DNS is leaking and thereby giving away that you’re trying to tunnel – one of the methods used by NetFlix, for example, to block out VPN users in their recent crackdown.

You can easily run the tests from the official site in two ways, with or without additional torrent checks. If you are a VPN user, then it might be worth to check up on – just to be on the safe side.

Kanye West Gets His Own Pirate Bay

Tune murmurer, paladin of egotism, and self-appointed “voice of this generation” Kanye West – recently exposed using The Pirate Bay to search for copyrighted software, despite threatening legal action against the notorious torrent site just last month – now has his own iteration of The Pirate Bay. Dubbed Kanye Bay, the TPB proxy sports a flattering caricature of West’s face, and even features a direct link to torrents of the “pop enigma’s” work.

Earlier this week, Kanye was caught searching for the Serum synthesiser software, which costs $189 to buy, on The Pirate Bay. Whether he actually downloaded a torrent of the program has not been established. Regardless, Spud17 – a TPB staffer – has decided to celebrate West’s use of the site with a proxy designed just for him.

“Should Mr. West experience any issues accessing the official domains of the galaxy’s most resilient torrent site, I’d suggest he try this nifty little proxy,” Spud17 told TorrentFreak.

“The other day, I came up with an equation that explains the way visionaries think as opposed to very calculated people,” Spud17 continued. “If someone asked you, ‘What is 2 and 3?’ most people would say 5. If you put 2 and 3 in front of me, I’m gonna say, ‘Well, 2 plus 3 is 5. 2 times 3 is 6. 2 divided by 3 is this. 3 divided by 2 is that.’ And then come up with an average of all those things..”

“That is the thing people marvel at like, ‘That really was not what I was expecting’… Then I made KanyeBay.com and I was like, ‘Yeah. This sh*t is like 50 per cent more influential than any other proxy ever made’,” he added.

“I believe that being selfish is vulgar. It’s like cursing. I think the world can be saved through sharing, because what is the most selfish thing someone can do? Kill someone. So, piracy is like the opposite of that,” Spud17 explained, with reasoning so sound not even Kanye could disagree. “The Bible was copied like a million times and nobody ever got hurt.”

Netflix Debates Geoblocking and VPN Use

Following its global rollout to over 130 countries, Netflix has been discussing the reality of its users bypassing geoblocked content via VPN services, admitting that it’s “not obvious” how to prevent it, The Globe and Mail reports. The technique of using VPNs, proxies, and DNS spoofers to access Netflix content in other countries has become widespread, especially in territories like Canada, citizens of which have access to only limited Netflix TV and movies, for which Ted Sarandos, Chief Content Officer for Netflix, blames “sliced and diced” territorial rights deals.

“Our ambition is to do global licensing and global originals, so that over maybe the next five, 10, 20 years, it’ll become more and more similar until it’s not different,” Neil Hunt, Netflix’s Chief Product Officer, during CES 2016 in Las Vegas last week. “We don’t buy only for Canada; we’re looking … for all territories; buying a singular territory is not very interesting anymore.”

Netflix in Canada also has to deal with cable providers such as Bell Media, which ‘protects’ its content to a fault, with CEO Mary Ann Turcke shopping her own daughter for bypassing Netflix’s geoblocking with a VPN, accusing her of “stealing”.

“We do apply industry standard technologies to limit the use of proxies,” Hunt added. “Since the goal of the proxy guys is to hide the source it’s not obvious how to make that work well. It’s likely to always be a cat-and-mouse game. [We] continue to rely on blacklists of VPN exit points maintained by companies that make it their job. Once [VPN providers] are on the blacklist, it’s trivial for them to move to a new IP address and evade.”

Netflix, however, hopes that users bypassing its geoblocks will become a thing of the past with global licensing deals. “When we have global rights, there’s a significant reduction in piracy pressure on that content. If a major title goes out in the U.S. but not in Europe, it’s definitely pirated in Europe, much more than it is if it’s released simultaneously,” Hunt said.

Anti-Blocking Website More Popular Than Spotify and Skype in the UK

While the UK High Court has been making busywork of blocking access to a myriad of popular torrent sites via the country’s ISPs, users apathetic to the restrictions have been using the sites anyway via the popular proxy site Unblocked.pw. Torrent fans have flocked to the site, using it to circumvent the token efforts of the UK justice establishment to control internet piracy, so much so that Unblocked.pw has become the 192nd most popular site in the country, placing it ahead of Spotify and Skype.

UK Prime Minister David Cameron loves a good block. Only this week, he was threatening to ban internet porn, because “Won’t somebody please think of the children?”. He said:

“Our one nation government is working hard to make the internet a safer place for children, the next step in this campaign is to curb access to harmful pornographic content which is currently far too widely available. I want to see age restrictions put into place or these websites will face being shut down.”

What is a “one nation government,” anyway? How is that any different from a regular government? Or, is Cameron slyly telling Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland that they don’t really count? In any case, the threat to take away the country’s porn is a deep cut, considering Pornhub, XHamster, Xvideos, and RedTube all feature within the top-100 sites in the UK, with TubeCup and YouPorn close behind:

  • Pornhub (#41)
  • XHamster (#44)
  • Xvideos (#47)
  • RedTube (#92)
  • TubeCup (#105)
  • YouPorn (#122)

At No. 44, PornHub is more popular than Netflix, even. But it was the position of Unblocked.pw that was most surprising, positioned at #192. The site, which is less than a year old, is already more popular than popular IM service Skype (#195) and music streaming site Spotify (#194).

Fighting censorship has been the primary motivation behind running Unblocked,” the site’s admin told TorrentFreak. “It’s to show that whatever regulators do to censor things online, there will always be a way around it. The initial motivation came from when The Pirate Bay was blocked in the Netherlands. We set up Proxybay.co to maintain a list of Pirate Bay proxy sites and show people how to create their own.”

If porn sites were to go the same way as torrent sites, expect to see the saucy equivalent of Unblocked.pw hit the top-200 sites in the UK soon after.

Thank you TorrentFreak for providing us with this information.

UK Expands Torrent Site Blacklist to Proxies

The UK High Court has quietly added a number of proxies and mirrors to its torrent site blacklist, restricting backdoor access to sites such as Torrentz and ExtraTorrent. Of course, ExtraTorrent has already launched a new mirror site to bypass the block.

The list of blocked torrent sites in the UK now exceeds one hundred, with enforcers constantly playing whack-a-mole in a desperate attempt to suppress every new torrent site URL that springs up. Last week’s ruling has seen torrentz-proxy.com, torrentsmirror.com, etproxy.com, extratorrentlive.com and extratorrentonline.com added to the blacklist.

“The High Court has declared that ExtraTorrent and Torrentz are operating unlawfully and infringing copyright. The Court Order which requires ISPs to block the sites also requires BPI to notify the ISPs of changes to the sites,” said a spokesperson for the BPI (British Phonographic Industry), one of many organisations that have obtained High Court orders against torrent sites to infringing upon copyrighted materials.

Fruitless efforts, though, since torrent sites are always one step ahead. “The connectivity issues were totally solved after we launched a new mirror. It appears that all UK visitors are able to visit the website now as the traffic is back and still growing,” the ExtraTorrent team told TorrentFreak.

The full list of sites blocked to copyright infringement within the UK now reads:

Rojadirecta, LiveTV, Drakulastream, Ebookee, LibGen, Freshwap, AvaxHome, Bookfi, Bookre, Freebookspot, popcorntime.io, flixtor.me, popcorn-time.se, isoplex.isohunt.to, watchonlineseries.eu, axxomovies.org, afdah.com, g2g.fm, Bursalagu, Fullsongs, Mega-Search, Mp3 Monkey, Mp3.li, Mp3Bear, MP3Boo, Mp3Clan, Mp3Olimp, MP3s.pl, Mp3soup, Mp3Truck, Musicaddict, My Free MP3, Plixid, RnBXclusive, STAFA Band, watchseries.lt, Stream TV, Watchseries-online, Cucirca, Movie25, watchseries.to, Iwannawatch, Warez BB, Ice Films, Tehparadox, Heroturko, Scene Source,, Rapid Moviez, Iwatchonline, Los Movies, Isohunt, Torrentz.pro, Torrentbutler, IP Torrents, Sumotorrent, Torrent Day, Torrenting, BitSoup, TorrentBytes, Seventorrents, Torrents.fm, Yourbittorrent, Tor Movies , Demonoid, torrent.cd, Vertor, Rar BG, bittorrent.am, btdigg.org, btloft.com, bts.to, limetorrents.com, nowtorrents.com, picktorrent.com, seedpeer.me, torlock.com, torrentbit.net, torrentdb.li, torrentdownload.ws, torrentexpress.net, torrentfunk.com, torrentproject.com, torrentroom.com, torrents.net, torrentus.eu, torrentz.cd, torrentzap.com, vitorrent.org.Megashare, Viooz, Watch32, Zmovie, Solarmovie, Tubeplus, Primewire, Vodly, Watchfreemovies, Project-Free TV, Yify-Torrents, 1337x, Bitsnoop, Extratorrent, Monova, Torrentcrazy, Torrentdownloads, Torrentreactor, Torrentz, Ambp3, Beemp3, Bomb-mp3, Eemp3world, Filecrop, Filestube, Mp3juices, Mp3lemon, Mp3raid, Mp3skull, Newalbumreleases, Rapidlibrary, EZTV, FirstRowSports, Download4all, Movie2K, KickAssTorrents, Fenopy, H33T, and The Pirate Bay.

Thank you TorrentFreak for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Privatoria.

ProxyHam Anonymising Router Disappears

A remote router that was to ensure absolute anonymity over Wi-Fi connections has been mysteriously shelved by its developers. ProxyHam, an untraceable “hardware proxy” designed to protect the identity of anyone who used it, was due to be unveiled at the DefCon conference later this month, but has now been pulled from the event after development of the device was ceased.

Rhino Security Labs, the developers of ProxyHam, announced on Twitter, “Effective immediately, we are halting further dev on #proxyham and will not be releasing any further details or source for the device,” following up with, “Existing #proxyham units will be disposed of and no longer be made available at @_defcon_”.

The circumstances of the device’s demise appear rather shadowy, with Rhino Security refusing to disclose the details of why it has called time on ProxyHam. In response to a concerned Twitter follower, Rhino Security said, “Can’t go into too much more detail, but are immediately shutting down all #proxyham research”.

Only a few weeks ago, Rhino Security’s Ben Caudill, creator of ProxyHam, was waxing lyrical about the hardware, which is based around a Raspberry Pi mini-computer. Caudill told Wired that ProxyHam would be “that last-ditch effort to remain anonymous and keep yourself safe,” boasting that “The KGB isn’t kicking in your door. They’re kicking in the door of the library 2.5 miles away.”

Wired contacted Caudill for more information regarding the project’s closure, to which he responded, “I can’t say much, which is unfortunate. It’s frustrating for me and for the team as a whole.”

Pure speculation, but it sounds as though an external influence has forced ProxyHam into the ground. Whether that’s governmental, legal, or corporate pressure, we’re unlikely to ever know.

Thank you Wired for providing us with this information.

A New Kind Of ProxyHam Coming to DefCon

Ok you now think I have been lying in 35 degree heat all day and have crossed a privacy tool with a local butcher. I can assure you I am not hallucinating and that purple leprechaun agrees with me, only kidding, it’s green. I am quite sane and am here to talk about a possible new proxy tool which could be a game changer for privacy conscious Individuals.

At the upcoming DefCon hacker conference in Las Vegas, a new tool by the name of ProxyHam is set to be unveiled, this device has been invented and developed by an individual by the name of Ben Caudill who aims to make it that little bit harder for network spies. This device is essentially a hardware proxy which is designed to use a radio frequency. By utilizing this form of connection, the device adds a physical layer of obfuscation to an internet user’s location

According to Google, obfuscation is defined as making something obscure which means your location is not transmitted over the Internet. This invention has been built for $200 dollars (£128) but the clever bit is still to come, the device connects wirelessly from a 900 megahertz antenna which is plugged into the Ethernet port of a PC, to a Raspberry Pi box which has been placed in a different location via a radio connection. This in turn means that any traceable location data is not from a person’s physical location, but from the ProxyHam box said individual has placed somewhere else.

This means that if the FBI come knocking or any other malevolent with power organization, they will think you live within a 2.5 mile radius of your actual address, and this means if you placed the box in Burger King, the fast food joint will be raided and not you. Here at eTeknix we are impartial and therefore would like to point out there are many other corrupt governments with which to be spied on and fast food joints with which to enlarge your liver.

At this stage these devices are still very much at the development and improvement stage, but if it can capture the mainstream, expect many boxes to pop up with confused officials staring at them to a town near you soon.

Thank You Wired for providing this information

Hola Founder Confirms VPN Sells Users’ Bandwidth

The operator of 8chan says the bandwidth of millions of Hola users is being sold for reuse, with some of it even being used to attack his site. Speaking with TorrentFreak, Hola founder Ofer Vilenski says that users’ idle resources are indeed utilized for commercial sale, but that has been the agreement all along.

Faced with increasing local website censorship and Internet services that restrict access depending on where a user is based, more and more people are turning to services such as Hola designed to overcome such limitations by sending your internet traffic via other networks. This then makes it appear that you’re located in another country – such as America.With prices plummeting to just a few dollars a month in recent years, VPNs are now within the budgets of most people. However, there are always those who prefer to get such services for free, without giving much consideration to how that might be economically viable.

With prices plummeting to just a few dollars a month for the service, VPNs and proxies are now within the budgets of most people. However, there are always those who prefer to get such services for free, without giving much consideration to how that might be economically viable.One of the most popular VPN/geo-unblocking solutions on the planet is operated by Israel-based Hola. It can be added to most popular browsers in seconds and has an impressive seven million users on Chrome alone. Overall the company boasts 46 million users of its service.

Now, however, the company is facing accusations from 8chan message board operator Fredrick Brennan. He claims that Hola users’ computers were used to attack his website without their knowledge, and that was made possible by the way Hola is setup.

“When a user installs Hola, he becomes a VPN endpoint, and other users of the Hola network may exit through his internet connection and take on his IP. This is what makes it free: Hola does not pay for the bandwidth that its VPN uses at all, and there is no user opt out for this,” Brennan says.

This means that rather than having their IP addresses cloaked behind a private server, free Hola users are regularly exposing their IP addresses to the world but associated with other people’s traffic – no matter what that might contain.While this will come as a surprise to many, Hola says it has never tried to hide the methods it employs to offer a free service.“Hola has gotten greedy. They recently (late 2014) realized that they basically have a 9 million IP strong botnet on their hands, and they began selling access to this botnet (right now, for HTTP requests only) at

“Hola has gotten greedy. They recently (late 2014) realized that they basically have a 9 million IP strong botnet on their hands, and they began selling access to this botnet (right now, for HTTP requests only) at https://luminati.io,” the 8chan owner said.

Thank you to TorrentFreakfor providing us with this information

Image courtesy of  Itproportal

Pirate Movie Streaming App Popcorn Time Blocked by UK Court

The High Court ruled yesterday that popular movie streaming platform Popcorn Time be blocked by the UK ISPs. Sky, BT, EE, TalkTalk, and Virgin Media will be forced to block access to five URLs that offer the Popcorn Time app for download.

In his ruling, Judge Briss did a marvellous job of stating the obvious regarding Popcorn Time’s legal status, stating, “It is manifest that the Popcorn Time application is used in order to watch pirated content on the internet and indeed it is also manifest that is its purpose.” Though his follow-up “No-one really uses Popcorn Time in order to watch lawfully available content” is not entirely correct, since movies on Popcorn Time are usually DVD or BluRay rips, meaning that they have to be “lawfully available” in order to be streamed. Users are just accessing them without paying for them via illegal means.

Popcorn Time has issued the following statement:

We’re pretty disappointed from the judicial system in the UK and feel pretty sorry for the citizens of England for their basic rights, like the freedom of speech and net neutrality being revoked so easily.

We hope to see some sort of protest from the citizens of the UK against this order, but given how easy it is for the judicial system there to hurt their basic rights, we doubt they will do so

We find this move they made pretty predictable and we’re sure that this is not the last of it. We’re working full force now even more than ever on making Popcorn Time fully p2p and soon the software will not be depended on any domain or centralized server to operate.

Since no ISP has challenged the order, it will come into effect soon, with access to popcorntime.io, flixtor.me, popcorn-time.se, and isoplex.isohunt.to denied to UK users. However, anyone who already has Popcorn Time installed should not see any disruption to their service. Regardless, as with the spate of blocked torrent sites over the last few years, the move is sure to prove futile, with proxies and VPNs offering savvy internet users access to any blocked content.

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information.

UK ISPs Start Blocking The Pirate Bay Proxies

Internet service providers in the UK have, very quietly, started to block access to websites that provide links to proxy sites for The Pirate Bay. The sites themselves do not contain any copyright infringing material and are purely informational which, presumably, is why the ISPs are being so hush-hush about blocking access to them.

A High Court order requires the six UK ISPs to block access to the world’s major torrent sites and streaming portals, though these blocks can be bypassed using proxy or VPN services. Sites that merely posts lists of website addresses, as the banned proxy list sites do, do not fall within the purview of that court order, though copyright holders are known to have put ISPs under pressure to restrict access to proxy sites.

Sites known to be blocked by Virgin Media and TalkTalk are piratebayproxy.co.ukpiratebayproxylist.com, and ukbay.org.

TorrentFreak spoke with Dan, the operator of UKBay.org, who is understandably confused over the blockade. “The new blocks are unbelievable and totally unreasonable. To block a site that simply links to another site just shows the level of censorship we are allowing ISP’s to get away with,” Dan said.

“UKBay is not even a PirateBay proxy. It simply provides links to proxies. If they continue blocking sites that link to sites, that link to sites… there’ll be nothing left.”

Source: TorrentFreak

Netflix Starts Blocking Proxies and VPNs

Smart Netflix users have been using VPNs to access content from the US site from abroad for years, but now the party’s over: Netflix has started blocking VPN and proxy services in an effort to resecure its region locks. For now, the blocks are limited, but could be the first step towards a blanket proxy block.

The first service to experience problems was the TorGuard VPN. Some users reported problems, and the company noticed that data connections with Netflix were being refused, but only from certain TorGuard IP addresses. Users found that changing their VPN location often solved the problem.

A strict proxy and VPN block will render a significant volume of region-locked content inaccessible. Since region-locking is often intrinsic to the complex licensing deal between TV and movie studios and Netflix, it appears that the situation won’t be changing for the foreseeable future.

Source: Techspot

UK Man Arrested for Hosting Proxy Server

A man has been arrested and released on bail for hosting a proxy server.

The 20 year old from Nottingham is being questioned by the police, with help from the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT), after they had found evidence that tied him to the creation of the proxy server which allowed access to 36 websites. All of these websites had been blocked by ISP’s including The Pirate Bay and EZTV. The proxy called Immunicity has now been blocked by the police and now only shows a police warning.

A proxy can allow a user to connect to websites that have been blocked by an ISP, much like a VPN can. The proxy server doesn’t actually host any files, it just makes accessing websites possible. Due to this I’m unsure on how the police are going to charge the man ad he has not violated copyright laws, he has just allowed users to route their traffic through his server.

The arrest is part of a larger clampdown on piracy websites called ‘Operation Creative’. During this clampdown police have been removing large company advertising from illegal websites, which basically removes their funding. Since this has happened however, more advertisements from porn websites and malware websites have popped up on torrent sites, making them a little riskier to browse.

Thanks to Wired for supplying us with this information.

Image courtesy of Wired.

Statistics Reveal that The Pirate Bay Traffic has Doubled Despite ISP Blocks… Problem?

Some ISP providers have been told by the government to block the popular torrent website, The Pirate Bay, due to its infringing content. Media groups all around the world have been battling piracy constantly and state that the blocks so far are effective and enough to diminish piracy.

However, a new statistic has revealed that The Pirate Bay’s traffic has doubled since the ISP blocks have been issued. It is said that the United States still remains the most popular traffic source and almost 9% of all users access the website through a proxy or VPN.

TorrentFreak has stated that The Pirate Bay confirmed its traffic increase since 2011, when the ISP blocks in question have been issued, having it doubled in just 3 years. The statistic below shows the number of unique visitors since 2011.

As a result, the censorship appears to have no significant effect on The Pirate Bay at all. It does however show minimal signs of restriction, having users who do not know how to use a proxy or VPN blocked out of using the website altogether, but it is safe to say that most people simply bypass the restrictions and continue to use the torrent website as usual.

Thank you TorrentFreak for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of TorrentFreak

Pirates Win Latest Virtual ‘War’, Music Website Redirects to The Pirate Bay

There has been a constant war between the record industry and the pirates, which doesn’t seem to come to an end anytime soon. It’s been going back and forth for some time now, having battles being won and lost by both sides almost equally. However, the latest ‘skirmish’ between the two apparently ended up with the pirates winning the ‘battle’ against the music industry.

The latest news points to Argentina and its ‘blockade’, more specifically its attempt to block all internet access to The Pirate Bay website. This comes as a result of the Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers (CAPIF) complaining about music and video piracy through the latter torrent website. Following the complain, all access towards The Pirate Bay was blocked nation-wide. This apparently was not tolerated by the pirates, having the CAPIF website hacked in less than 24h after officials established the blockade.

The hacking attempt apparently was not to deface or take revenge by blocking the CAPIF website as well. The attack has been in a way quite ‘brilliant’, having to transform the CAPIF website into a fully function Pirate Bay proxy. The website then bypassed the nation-wide blockade and redirected users attempting to go onto the CAPIF website towards The Pirate Bay, which is really ironic, since potential customers were then redirected to a website full of multimedia files, having the able to download them completely ‘free’.

The CAPIF website has since then been restored after about 10 hours of ‘serving’ users a variety of torrents. While the hacking was hilarious to some extent, it does send a strong message to officials that pirate activists are not going to take such actions lightly and are able to fight back against the government actions to take down torrent websites.

Thank you Ubergizmo for providing us with this information

PirateBrowser Passes The 1 Million Downloads Milestone

The PirateBrowser has been out for a while now and the modified Firefox browser with Tor integration and the foxyproxy add-on is actually proving very popular with internet users, having managed to rack up an impressive 1 million downloads in about 3 months according to TorrentFreak. The PirateBrowser now accounts for 0.5% of all visits to the Pirate Bay which means thousands of active users every day. The PirateBrowser can be downloaded at its official website or on any other number of download sites (Softpedia, CNET, etc).

“PirateBrowser is a bundle package of the Tor client (Vidalia)FireFox Portable browser (with foxyproxy addon) and some custom configs that allows you to circumvent censorship that certain countries such as Iran, North Korea, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Denmark, Italy and Ireland impose onto their citizens.” Reads the official website.

While the PirateBrowser is growing in popularity proxies are still preferred by the vast majority of people as these allow them to continue using their current browser. 7% of Pirate Bay visits come from a direct proxy connection.

The Pirate Bay team told TorrentFreak they are currently updating and improving the PirateBrowser. They’ve also stated that they are working on:

“A special BitTorrent-powered application, which lets users store and distribute The Pirate Bay and other websites on their own computers, making it impossible for third parties to block them…This “p2p browser” should be able to keep The Pirate Bay operational, even if the site itself is pulled offline. There is currently no estimated release date set for this second project, but it will take a few more months of development at minimum.”

Image courtesy of PirateBrowser

PirateBrowser Passes 100,000 Downloads Already

TorrentFreak reports that within just three days of being release the Pirate Browser has passed 100,000 downloads already. The Pirate Browser is the Pirate Bay’s customised browser, based on FireFox 23, and is configured to navigate around Pirate Bay blockades as well as blockades of other torrent sites. In addition it uses a TOR client to protect the user more and a customised proxy configuration to improve page loading performance.

While the download has clocked an impressive 100,000 already, the official torrent file is also being seeded by more than 5000 people and growing. While the new Pirate Browser is proving very popular the Pirate Bay wants to remind people that it does not provide internet anonymity, only a way to circumvent blockades of torrent websites.

“I didn’t think it would catch on so fast,” The Pirate Bay’s Winston tells TorrentFreak. “I guess people want to see the websites their governments and courts are trying to hide from them.It’s not providing anonymity and it’s not secure to hide your identity. Pirate Browser is only supposed to circumvent censoring and website blocking. If we made the browser fully anonymous it would only slow down browsing”.

Image courtesy of the Next Web