Proposed “Online Safety Bill” Being Debated In the House Of Lords

Guess whose back? Indeed after a short hiatus I am back and raring to be creative concerning my written articles for eTeknix, although, in reality it has only been around 6 weeks since my last piece. So, what to write? I know, let’s delve into the proposed “Online Safety Bill” which is currently being debated in the UK courtesy of the House of Lords.

According to reports on the government’s own Parliament website, the bill is being debated at the “1st sitting committee stage” and proposes a law to compel “internet service providers and mobile phone operators to provide an internet service that excludes adult content” This includes provisions to offer strict and compulsory age verification checks to NSFW sites and also a role for Ofcom. There are also proposals to educate parents through digital on demand programme services and a licensing scheme for such websites.

It will be interesting to see how the debate develops and also the challenges of implementing such a law, after all, ISPs will first have to define what constitutes an “adult” website before blocking it to individuals who are under the age of 18. A further interesting angle is the proposal to “require electronic device manufacturers to provide a means of filtering internet content”.

Logically these proposals are unworkable and may in all probability be circumvented by various tech means; there is also the question of legitimate and educational sites that might fall under the banner of such a law. Another aspect which could cause concern is the proposed age verification checks, the only way this could be implemented is for a mechanism to be introduced to verify consumers through official identification without it being intercepted by hackers and a myriad of external cyber threats.

Image courtesy of echo

“5G Playground” Opens the Door for Warp Speeds

Internet connection speeds have been somewhat of a hot topic over the last decade or so, consumers who demand ever-increasing speeds while internet service providers have been particularly lagging in certain regions of the world. Well, researchers who are developing new super-super-fast standard 5G mobile technologies have what has been described as a “playground” which they can visit in South Korea.

It has been reported that Service provider SK Telecom (South Korean wireless telecommunications operator) has unveiled its Research and Development “5G Playground” on Thursday with partners including Ericsson, Nokia, Intel and Samsung Electronics, it was also announced that a collection of regional standard bodies would host a series of events with the aim of building a global consensus on the emergence of 5G.

5G is potentially an important breakthrough after SK Telecom and Nokia demonstrated the possible capabilities of this network which ran at a super quick 19.1 Gbps (per second), SK plans to launch a 5G trial service in 2017.

As technology is becoming more advanced so is certainly the need for a turbo charged infrastructure, this new standard is expected to be completed by 2020, although it might vary as to the rollout progression speed per country. Until at least then, many people will have to make do with current speeds.

Image courtesy of thenextsiliconvalley

 

Germany Promises 50Mbps Broadband

With a wide majority of the world using internet on a regular, if not every day, basis, we need to be aware of just how much we use the internet for. While most activities are mundane and almost ritualistic in how we do them each day. There are some which we take a lot of time to do, and can even be in their work life every day. With more and more people relying on the internet for everyday work related activities speed is essential (yes, we understand that you want that YouTube video to buffer a little faster too). Germany has decided that it will take the first step and states that it will promise all users 50Mbps broadband across the entire country.

The current highest download speed (on average) is South Korea with 23.6Mbps, with the average speed in the US only measuring at 11.9Mbps. With initial estimates putting 70% of Germany already connected to 50Mbps connections, the cost of upgrading everyone to this speed is expected to be rather small. It should be noted though that their current average speed is only 11Mbps, a value only slightly lower than the US’s and under half of the current world’s leaders average.

With the public being asked to provide 10% of the cost, with 90% being provided by a combination of German states (40%) and development projects (50%), users could soon see their internet speed jumping.

Thank you The Next Web for the information.

Image courtesy of Gecko And Fly.

The FCC Will Vote on Plan to Share Valuable 3.5GHz Specturm next Month

The FCC is said to be voting on a spectrum-sharing plan that could make its way to the military, mobile service providers and individuals alike on April 17th. The spectrum is said to open up a frequency from 3550 to 3700 MHz to three classes of users, including new mobile device owners who could use the service similar to Wi-Fi.

The current demand for wireless spectrum could benefit from auctioning off the new 3.5 GHz, leading to better wireless data performance for users in crowded places, provide better rural broadband services and even give a better spectrum for industries that do not use Wi-Fi and LTE services.

In order to keep track of existing radios and licensed services, the FCC also plans to implement a Spectrum Access System alongside the new spectrum in order to manage the interference. This is why it plans to seek proposals for both the Spectrum Access System and sensing service at the same time, but the new tech is not likely to be approved before 2016.

Thank you PC World for providing us with this information

Amazon Offers Handyman Services through its ‘Amazon Local Services’

Amazon has started offering local handyman services with its ‘Amazon Local Services’.

A number of visitors to Amazon.com have started noticing listings for local technicians for the fitting of items like TVs and washing machines.

It’s not just about installation either, Amazon’s site for providers interested in the new service, lists a whole hosts of potential services from repairs for phones laptops to bike chain lubrication and car oil changes. Amazon will take a 20% cut on service charged less than $1000 and a 15% cut for services charged above that amount. The service is currently only available in select cities in 9 states. Re/code says that this is all part of Amazon’s efforts to become the absolute central location for all purchases – whether that be for goods or services.

Let’s just say that Amazon is trying to take over the world.

Source: Re/code