Self-Destructing Bullet Patented by US Army

One of the largest contributors to technologies growth is the armed forces, with people looking at everything from mounting rail-guns to ships to being able to inject a sponge into people to stop gunshot wounds from bleeding. The latest patent that the U.S. Army has filed for though is designed to prevent harm, in the form of a self-destructing bullet.

.50 calibre bullets are designed to be used in large guns, with everything from a sniper rifle to a mounted machine gun firing them off with their range and size often making them the round of choice for long distance engagements. This puts you at the risk of firing bullets that may not stop where you want them to. This may no longer be the case though thanks to a patent filed by the U.S. Army.

Researchers Brian Kim, Mark Minisi and Stephen McFarlane didn’t feel rounds had to keep going. Two years after filing for their patent it was approved, allowing for a new design of bullet that would have a “timed” lifespan. Designed to ignite the second the round is fired, the countdown would begin, ending with the bullet ending its travel once the reaction reaches its final stage.

McFarlane stated that “the biggest advantage is reduced risk of collateral damage”. While the design is based and tested on the .50 calibre rounds, the patent extends to the method used in creating the new form of rounds, meaning that it could be used in everything from small handguns to large calibre weapons.

Check Your Google Account Settings – Get 2GB of Extra Storage

Hacks are everywhere these days, from your telephone company to kids toys. So in order to make you a little more aware, and to celebrate Safer Internet Day 2016, checking the security of your Google account settings will grant an extra 2 GB of free google drive storage.

In order to claim this freebie, you will need to perform five steps. The first is to check your recovery information, after checking your recovery phone number, email and security question you can then move on to checking which devices are authorised to connect to your account, removing those that shouldn’t have permission.

The third step is checking your account permissions, this is every app that has permissions on your account. Remember that app you downloaded for fun? It has permissions you don’t want it to have, so it can go. Once that’s done, you can check your 2-step verification settings, a little extra security to make it harder for others to access your account.

Once this is all done just click Continue to account settings and get your 2 GB of free Drive storage. While you shouldn’t have to be promised free stuff to make sure your accounts are safe, it’s always nice to see companies interested in your security. Check your other accounts and help yourself avoid the pain of being hacked.

iPhone Unlock Perused After Defendant Pleads Guilty

In recent years, technology has evolved in such a way that the law is often trying to catch up with the technology that comes out. In the last few months, technology companies have come to odds with the government regarding a range of topics but none more so than encryption.
Encryption is the process of messing up information in a logical way so if you just so happen to bump into it (or catch it on purpose), unless you were meant to read it you are unable to (or at least find it difficult). Apple has recently come at odds with the U.S. government as they have been asked to unlock (effectively disabling the protection and encryption on) an iPhone. The case just got more interesting though with them claiming that they should still unlock the phone after the defendant pleaded guilty.

The government quoted a law written in the 18th Century called the All Writs Act. A writ is essentially an order for a company or person to perform an action, and its use has displeased many people, with Ken Dreifach (the attorney representing Apple) clarifying why this is a worrying use of an old power,

“The government could seemingly co-opt any private company it wanted to provide services in support of law enforcement activity, as long as the underlying activity was authorized by a warrant. The All Writs Act does not confer such limitless authority.”

Even though the defendant, Jun Feng, has since pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, the prosecutors are still requesting that Apple unlock the phone just in case it contains information that could help other “ongoing” cases. The iPhone in question is running iOS7, as of iOS 8 Apple have enabled full encryption in an act it has stated would prevent them from complying with such orders.

Do you think Apple should unlock the phone? Should companies be forced to perform any action they can at the request of a court?