Lottery Terminals Hacked To Print Winning Tickets

The lottery is all about odds, from your numbers being picked to choosing to stay with your classic numbers or go for a lucky dip this weekend. It seemed that a group of people didn’t quite want luck to factor in and had in fact hacked lottery terminals in order to print winning tickets.

A group of six people has been charged with the crime in which they worked or owned retail stores that took part in the 5 Card Cash game in Connecticut. The only reason they got caught? They were winning too much.

Typically the state average for winning the lottery was 24 percent, but in one of the stores, there was a 76% chance of winning. They were able to do this by tampering with the terminals used to print lottery tickets and then cash them in. They might not be all of it though as investigators are claiming that “more arrests may be made in the future”.

The Hartford Courant stated the hack worked:

“An investigator for the Connecticut Lottery determined that terminal operators could slow down their lottery machines by requesting a number of database reports or by entering several requests for lottery game tickets. While those reports were being processed, the operator could enter sales for 5 Card Cash tickets. Before the tickets would print, however, the operator could see on a screen if the tickets were instant winners. If tickets were not winners, the operator could cancel the sale before the tickets printed.”

The 5 Card Cash game was cancelled after several months when the lottery officials realised that it came with more winning tickets than the system should have allowed. To this day, the game has remained suspended and looks to remain that way with the revelation of how many people were able to break the system for profit.

Doctors Implant 3D-Printed Vertebrae

3D Printers have helped medicine come a long way, with the ability to customise and create things in an easy and cost-effective way that previously would have been impossible to do. 3D-printed ribs, to livers, eyes and even ears. While these are all amazing feats, they have always been generic items, things which are custom but not unique in their design. At the end of 2015, this changed though when a patient was implanted with two 3D printed vertebrae.

Vertebrae are the discs that cling to your spine and are responsible for giving you a lot of your movement. The patient in question suffered from a form of cancer that had formed on the top two of his vertebrae, potentially threatening his spinal cord as it developed. The top two vertebrae are the ones responsible for your heads movement, meaning that grafting one from another piece of bone or material would be particularly difficult given their custom nature.

The solution was to work with an Australian medical device manufacturer, Anatomics, who using a 3D printer created the top two vertebrae using a 3D printer and some titanium. Ralph Mobbs, the neurosurgeon who performed the surgery stated that it was “a pure delight” to perform the surgery knowing that you had already done it on a model.

The surgery itself took 15 hours to perform and given the location was not without risk. Described as “essentially disattaching the patient’s head from his neck and taking the tumour out and reattaching his head back into his neck”. The surgery was a success though and Mobbs was able to not only remove the tumor but also implant the prosthetic into the patient.

Is there anything people can’t do when they work together with technology and each other?

We Can Now Create 3D Printed Organs!

3D printing is not a new area for doctors and surgeons to use, they’ve managed to 3D print new ribs and a sternum for a cancer patient and that was only the start. 3D printing has come a long way, being able to print everything from a bike to a supercar, a PC case or even a houses. The problem is that they are all solid things, inanimate objects and items that we use on occasion, the problem with organs is that we use them everyday and need to keep alive. Previous attempts to grow human organs have had trouble with the latter stage, with it proving difficult to give an organ what it needs to grow, this has now come one step closer to being solved thanks to 3D printing.

Published in Nature Biotechnology, the recent advancement means that not only can organs be “printed” but they are kept alive and retain their strength long after creation. They do this by creating a lattice of layers, with holes going throughout the organ, this means that when it is still developing it can absorb the nutrients and chemicals needed, filling out and retaining its strength as it absorbs its needed Oxygen.

This solution is a step forward, being described as the “geese that lays the golden egg”, and certainly seems more in line with common ideas than using a candy floss machine to create blood vessels.

ASUSTOR Releases ADM 2.5.2 Beta

ASUSTOR is starting the new year with a new beta version of their upcoming ADM 2.5.2 firmware and it comes with new features as well as some bug and security fixes. There are three new main features in ADM 2.5.2 beta that could make your network life a little easier. There is a new DHCP server feature, an improved print server feature that now supports USB IP printing, and the Share link explorer that helps to make sharing more intuitive and flexible.

The first new addition is the DHCP server that can take over the job normally performed by your router. It might be convenient for a lot of people that they only have to use one control panel and user interface to configure their network rather than two. Let the router handle the basic connection while your NAS, that is running anyway, is doing the rest. ASUSTOR’s DHCP server can assign multiple IP subnets from one LAN interface, and also supports DHCP reservations for specified network devices

The Print server function got an upgrade and now also supports USB IP Printer mode to virtually connect the printer with your PC and generally increase the range of printers that the NAS is compatible too without worries. USB IP printer mode is used together with Windows ASUSTOR Control Center, which again limits it to the Windows ecosystem. Then again, most consumer use Windows.

The new Share link explorer makes it easier for the people you share files with. When your friend or colleague receives a share link, he or she can see the shared files and folders in a list and with just one click they can select only the needed files to download. This makes file sharing more intuitive and flexible.

There are also some additional upgrades behind the lines such as the PHP backend being updated from version 5.3 to 5.6 and Apache2’s HTTPd got upgraded from 2.2.29 to 2.2.31 to address the CVVE-2015-3183 security vulnerability. The App Central got a new installation wizard. The built-in database switched from MySQL to MariaDB 10 which should free up some general resources.

You can download the new beta firmware directly on ASUSTOR’s beta program website.

Adidas Creating 3D-Printed Shoes From Old Plastic

We are constantly reminded about the world around us and sometimes our impact on it for the worse. Companies and countries alike are looking for ways to create a better world by first reducing our impact on it, from solar energy to recycling companies are looking at new and amazing ways to help improve the world. Adidas is looking to use recycling to help not only save the planet but also give you some new footwear.

Made from some of the ocean plastics and gillnets, the wall of netting that you typically use to catch fish, the new pair of trainers aren’t just looking at using old materials. Futurecraft 3D is the name given to Adidas’s 3D printing technology exploration, meaning instead of crafting your shoes they will instead be printed to your requirements.

While no release date has been set for the shoes making it to the public market, can you imagine what this could mean? Are your feet odd sizes? How about that toe that always seems to dig into the side of any shoe you wear? Custom shoes, using recycled components meaning its better for the environment and quicker, you could even walk into a shoe store and custom order a pair which they print while you have your lunch.

3D Printed Sternum And Ribs For Cancer Patient

3D Printing has taken off in recent years, with everything from toys to houses being designed and built by anyone with a computer (and a big enough printer). Some of the biggest advantages of the 3D printer are quite simply those provided to medical sciences, with advances allowing people to print items that could help people in ways unthought of several years ago, such as a 3D printed skull for a 3-year-old girl in china. The latest though is another step, with a set of ribs and sternum being printed for a 54-year-old man.

Medical company Anatomics and CSIRO’s 3D printing facility developed the technology required to 3D print the titanium sternum and ribcage implant that was used. In this instance, the gentlemen had several bones removed that had been affected by a cancerous tumour, called chest wall sarcoma.

Crediting the surgery as a success, Surgeon José Aranda stated that “to his knowledge this is the first 3D titanium printed sternum (made through) custom-made processes”. What this means is that in place of a regular sheet of titanium the implant was actually constructed and designed before being built, making it an easier fit and more accurate to the original autonomy of the gentlemen involved.

Thank you Tech Spot for the information and the image.

3D Printed Milk Lids Reveal Bad Milk

Milk. Some love it, some dislike it. We are told from a young age that calcium makes our bones strong and we are often told to have more. The experience can be a little daunting though for those unfortunate souls who have poured themselves a glass or over their favourite cereals only to have a foul taste and smell emanate from the white liquid they poured out (if it’s still a liquid).

This may be preventable through with the creation of the “smart lid”, a device that is hidden in plain sight. In fact, in the lid you place atop your milk. The device was created by researchers at the University of California and the National Chiao Tung University in Taiwan and aims to help people detect the quality of their milk before they open the bottle.

The lid detects changes within the milk which demonstrate that it’s going off, such as the presence of bacteria and can transmit these details wirelessly to devices such as smartphones and tablets. The resonant chips built inside the 3D printed caps means the caps don’t require a giant battery built in and can allow for low price monitoring and tracking of milk and possibly other foods.

Imagine going to the store and checking with your phone if the milk you just placed in the basket is good or if that sell by date was a really bad estimate for when it would go off.

Thank you Entrepreneur for providing us with this information.

Saving Rhino’s By 3D Printing Their Horns

The problem is an old and well-known one. Poaching. Rhino’s are hunted for the belief that their horns possess qualities such as being able to treat fevers or making skin look more beautiful. With these beliefs come a demand for the horns, with a price of roughly 40,000 per kilogram of rhino horn. The demand has grown so bad, and the poachers so desperate, that the last northern white rhino is under permanent armed guards to help protect it from poachers.

BioTech startup Pembient hopes to have come up with the solution by taking the rhino horn back to its core, and by that I mean what its made out of. Rhino horns are made of keratin, a fibre everyone knows about because it’s contained within your fingernails and hair. That’s right, the same thing you have growing from your hands is made out of exactly the same thing a rhino’s horn is made out of.

Pembient hopes that by using this protein, with a little help from a 3D printer and some rhino DNA, to print out rhino horns which will be nearly indistinguishable from the ones taken from a living rhino. The benefit of this, not only will the horns be quite easy to make and easy to sell, they will available at 1/8th of the price that the removed horns go for. With such a price difference and ease of supply, Pembient hopes to be able to print the poachers out of business by flooding the market, effectively making the job a waste of time for poachers. Another bonus is that because the horn is available created from pure keratin (and rhino DNA) it will be free from the effects of pollutants.

I dislike poachers, even more so those which target creatures that are extinct or near extinction just for an easy pay-day. With this solution in mind, the fight against illegal rhino poaching may finally come to an end as the clients get what they want and the poachers get nothing for the crimes they’ve committed.

Thank you IFLScience for the information.

Image courtesy of Save The Rhino.

L’Oreal Teaming Up To 3D Print Skin

Cause you’re worth it. The catch phrase of L’Oreal, a world-famous cosmetic company, is known to many. Did you know that they grow skin from donated samples? How about that they want to start 3D printing human skin?

Teaming up with the start-up company Organovo, L’Oreal hopes to be able to use the created skin in its product tests. Organovo, however, is new to this area, having already claimed that they can 3D print a human liver that will last for up to 40 days.

Stated as in the early research stages, experts are divided about how this would work. Many believe that the science behind it is plausible, and that is is possible to 3D print skin and other parts using human cells. One possible application of this would be to help burn and trauma patients, being able to replace the damaged skin and create skin graphs on site in each hospital using specialist 3D printers.

A major advantage of this would be in regards to animal testing, with the ability to test cosmetics on human tissue giving better results and more in-depth knowledge about side effects without the need for animal testing or damage to a person undergoing the testing.

With the ability to create more humane testing methods, help repair damage done by fire to burn victims and with untold potential it will be interesting to follow how L’Oreal and Organovo use this technology and research.

Thank you BBC and Organovo for providing us with this information.

3D Print Your Own GlaDOS Robotic Ceiling Arm Lamp!

Earlier today we brought you news of a very cool 3D printed guitar, which is great for musicians to tinker around with. However, if you’re more excited by the world of amateur robotics and the legendary GlaDOS from Portal, this may be a lot more exciting for you!

Someone has created a guide on how to 3D print your own GlaDOS, which you can then fit to your ceiling as a robotic lamp; it may very well be one of the coolest things I have ever seen!

Unfortunately, there’s a few manufacturing problems at the moment, where the GlaDOS gets quite hot, some of the build would require electrical wiring and no doubt a fair bit of skill with fitting servo motors. However, the 3D files are there, so you could always build a stationary unit that would require less skill to construct. There’s certainly room to tweak and improve the design, but the core concept is no doubt too awesome to resist for any budding engineer with a 3D printer at their disposal.

Of course, if the GlaDOS lamp is too hard, you could always just make the potato version!

Now, if someone can get me a 3D printer and a model of FFVII Midgar, with working train and Mako reactors, that’d be great.

New Technology Put to use – a 3D-Printed Castle!

3D printing is an extremely cool concept – some people enjoy printing weapons, others like to make food and there are some really practical applications such as fighting against disability. But why not take it one step further – who doesn’t want to live in a castle?!

Andrey Rudenko from Minnesota is an architect who has taken a liking towards 3D printing, so much so that he’s spent months designing and building this masterpiece. Starting this project in April, Rudenko decided he wanted to set the bar for 3D-printed homes.

This kind of printing has previously encountered some scrutiny, with similar projects to this have been carried out in China. With all new building and architectural technology, the question of stability and longevity of materials is often asked. In an interview with 3DPrint, Rudenko said:

“It has been two years since I first began toying with the idea of a 3D printer that was capable of constructing homes. While testing the printer, I ran into obstacles (such as the nightmare of the extruder clogging) and discovered even further abilities of the printer, like that it can print much more than 50cm a day as I originally thought. I was able to calibrate the machine so that it prints nearly perfect layers now, and I played with various heights and widths of the cement layers.”

Rudenko’s printer uses layers on concrete measuring 10mm high by 30mm wide, allowing him to create this amazingly detailed castle. Often 3D concrete printers can make quite crude and uneven projects, but this one seems like a massive success.

As the technology develops, 3D printing is becoming cheaper and more mainstream. When they become feasible for the ‘average’ public to start purchasing them freely – what will you start making?

Images courtesy of 3DPrint

King of the 3D-Castle

We’ve seen many things 3D printed before, but this one is my favourites by far. The Minnesota based Andrey Rudenko has amazed us before with his goal of a 3D printed house and his concrete 3D printer is already a reality. He has shown us some smaller projects in the past and is now stepping up the size.

A couple of months ago he announced that he was going to print a 3D castle as a large scale test before printing his house. Not only has he begun this process, he is almost done with it. The ability to print smaller buildings would give him the confidence to advance on to the full scale, he told.

The castle is big enough for people to both stand and walk inside and he is currently printing 50 cm of height every 8 hours. Test have shown that he could go as high as 75-100 cm during warm temperatures. The dark-grey area on the images show one such printing period.

“I still have some imperfections, mostly when I stop the printer,” Rudenko wrote. “But if I print nonstop, the layers look great.Though I’m not completely finished with this structure yet, from the current progress, I can already see that I am ready for the next step, which is printing a house with this technology.”

Rudenko is still a little behind his original schedule, wanting to start the print of his house this summer. While the summer isn’t over yet, it seems unlikely that he’ll manage to stick to that timeline. The small delay doesn’t diminish the awesomeness of his projects and I for one can’t wait to see this one finished.

Rudenko also told that he still plans to make a few improvements to the printer and redesign a few parts of the house before the actual print. It should be clear by now that his dream of a fully printed house isn’t just a dream any more.

Thank you 3Dprint.com for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of 3Dprint.com

Scientists Work Out How To 3D Print Vascular Networks

3D Printing has come a long way, from objects to food and now even human skin and meat. One of the major problems when attempting to print human meat was printing out the vascular network, meaning all the blood vessels and ventricles. However, it appears that even the latter problem has been recently solved by scientists from the University of Sydney, Harvard, Stanford and MIT.

The scientists have apparently solved the problem by creating a skeleton of vessels, which was then used as a basis to grow human cells around it. Once the process was complete and stable, the scientists dissolved the 3D printed material, leaving only the vascular network.

“Imagine being able to walk into a hospital and have a full organ printed – or bio-printed, as we call it – with all the cells, proteins and blood vessels in the right place, simply by pushing the ‘print’ button in your computer screen,” said Dr. Luiz Bertassoni of the University of Sydney. “While recreating little parts of tissues in the lab is something that we have already been able to do, the possibility of printing three-dimensional tissues with functional blood capillaries in the blink of an eye is a game changer.”

Building vascular networks is a big thing, but using them is even greater than imagined. It appears that the vessels are then used to transport nutrients through bioprinted tissue in order to achieve better cell differentiation and growth. Summing it all up, scientists are now able to create ‘organs’ in the lab, having the scientists believe that this will eventually lead to true organ regeneration.

Thank you TechCrunch for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of 3DPrint.com

Publisher Wants To Print All Of Wikipedia

Wikipedia is both a blessing and a curse for many of us, it’s a great resource of knowledge that you can call upon for that brief moment you need a fact, an answer for a quiz, or to gain insight into something you’re researching. The only issue is that it isn’t exactly the most accurate source of knowledge, but given its overall size it’s still pretty amazing.

Despite the inaccuracy of Wikipedia, one publisher wants to print the whole thing into books, a task that would fill 1000 books per volume! Not exactly the sort of collection that will fit on the average book case, that’s for sure.

Pedia Press have gone to crown funding website Indiegogo with their campaign, hoping to raise $50,000 in funding to get the website printed in book form. At the moment they plan to print in grey scale, but have said that they may switch to colour if the funding goals are exceeded and that new additions would have to be printed in the future to add additional information as the site updates (which happens constantly).

This is a really cool idea, but almost pointless at the same time. I’m not sure what it would archive other than being a fun project and a massive hog on some universities book cases.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/-tWgA_3LRiA[/youtube]

Thank you Indiegogo for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Indiegogo.

Asda To Offer 3D Printing Services In UK Stores This Year

Getting a photo of your family is one thing, but what if you could capture your family moment and have it immortalised in an 8″ action figure? Well that is exactly what you can do now thanks to 3D printers.

While much credit has gone to 3D printers for manufacturing, being able to replace parts of things with replications and all kinds of clever and innovative uses, there are also lots of fun applications and making 3D models of yourself is barely scratching the surface.

Asda actual say you could scan anything up to the size of a family car with this technology, so long as you don’t mind the print being scaled down to no more than 8″, at least for now.

It only takes two minutes to scan yourself or what ever object you desire (within reason of course), then you can pick up the item next time you visit the store. As much as the technology can do things quickly, a few days wait for something this cool is definitely worth it.

Pricing is a little vague at this time, but are expected to start from around £40. It may not be cheap, but few new technologies are these days, although I bet that price will soon fall as popularity of the service increases and the technology improves further.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/xzoq4Uzw9Cw[/youtube]

Thank you Pocket Lint for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Pocket Lint.

German Police 3D Print Some Guns For Testing

People around the world have been saying that 3D printing is a national threat, not because people can craft that missing Lego brick that they really need, but because they can use it to print an untraceable, unregistered and potentially lethal weapon such as a gun. German police have taken up the challenge to test just how dangerous these weapons really are by 3D printing a range of their own.

There have been fears of 3D printed guns ever since Cody Wilson of Defence Distributed made a crude 3D printable gun and made the blueprints for the 3D model available for download. The prints were downloaded around 100,000 times before the US Office of Defence Trade Controls Compliance shut them down, although given how the internet works I doubt they’ve been able to remove them completely. What’s worse is that the gun, known as the Liberator was made using a 3D printer that cost just $8000, a price that has likely reduced since the original was created.

The German police have been busy testing how easy or hard it is to sneak the weapon through security checks and other such systems, naturally they haven’t really shared their results on that part. Yet the have told us that while the gun can fire a standard bullet 17cm into a standard firing block, the gun also has a habit of exploding when fired, it is after all just made from plastic.

Thank you Fudzilla for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of The Register.

Humble Weekly Sale: 11 Bit Studios – Week of June 13th

For the past few weeks Humble Bundle brings us a new Weekly Bundle! This week is the same as the others, bringing us an awesome bundle of games for a low great price. This week’s bundle brings us several games, unfortunately we are only able to redeem one on Steam, Anomaly Warzone Earth. Though all of the other games are all available for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android!

This week’s Humble Weekly Sale includes 5 magnificent games and some bonus content too, all from 11 bit studios.

  • Anomaly Warzone Earth
  • Anomaly Warzone Earth: Mobile Campaign
  • Sleepwalker’s Journey
  • Funky Smugglers

Beat the Average and you will receive

  • Anomaly Korea
  • Bonus Content*

* Bonus content includes

  • Anomaly 2 Mech Figurine 3D print source
  • Desktop Wallpapers

With this remarkable bundle you get to play 5 awesome games, customize your desktop with some cool wallpaper and you can even print a 3D model. You will also have access to all of the soundtracks, except for the mobile campaign, though it is most likely the same soundtrack as Warzone Earth.

If you are not familiar with the way that the Humble Bundle system works, it is really easy. Humble Bundle gives us a list of games that they offer, and you are able to get all of them for how much you want to pay by giving us

“Name Your Price” you as the customer get to name your price for the games that are offered, if you pay at least one dollar you get steam codes for the games that are available on Steam. Usually these games are also DRM free, which means that you have the ability to download them from the Humble Bundle website. Usually there is also a game or two that get if you “Beat The Average”, this means that if you pay more than the average person for the games, the bonus games are given to you.

These “Name Your Price” events also allow you to specify where the money that you pay goes. By default

  • 65% of your payment goes to the Developers of the games, if there are multiple developers the 65% is split up evenly.
  • 20% of your payment goes to charity split evenly between the charities supported.
  • 15% of your payment goes as a Humble Tip to Humble Bundle. (Which pays for bandwidth, and development of their promotions.)

There are several payment methods, these include Paypal, Amazon Payments, Google Wallet, and you also can pay with Bitcoin.

Humble Bundle primarily supports two charities the majority of the time, those two charities are Electronic Frontier Foundation and Child’s Play. I encourage you to verify and research more about these charities as you should with any charity that you might donate to.

More information on Child’s Play can be found at this website www.childsplaycharity.org/, the organization works with over 70 children’s hospitals worldwide to improve children’s lives with toys and games.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation can be found check looking at their website, www.eff.org, this organization works to secure humanities digital rights, keeping the internet free.

Special Thank you to HumbleBundle.com for continuing to bring us awesome new bundles.

Images from HumbleBundle.com as well as  EFF.org & ChildsPlayCharity.org