Malware In Hilton Hotels Results in Card Details Being Stolen

How often do you use your card? When you pop down to the shop and breaking that ten-pound note will result in too many coins to carry back? How about when you’re buying things online? Finally, how many have used their cards to book hotels? If you’ve stayed at a Hilton hotel recently and used your card to pay at one of their Point of Sale (POS) terminals, you may want to double check your cards not got anything suspicious on it.

Hilton Hotels has stated they are investigating the possible security breach reported by Brian Krebs, an investigative journalist, who traced a collection of misused cards and found a common source in the till’s that are located in one of the many restaurants and gift shops located in Hilton Hotels  located in the US.

Sadly this is not the end of the story, the security alert that Visa released for this flaw was made in August, with the malware apparently being active between April and July this year. Given the number of hotels, and the ease at which people can pay for things using their cards, the number of potential cards that have been affected by this issue is surely only going to rise as more and more people become aware of it.

As with all cards, credit or debit alike, you should always keep an eye on it and raise any concerns regarding payments that you don’t recall making, or seem to be to companies you’ve never heard of, to your bank/building society.

Thank you the Register for the information.

Image courtesy of ITP.

Android 5.0 Features No Silent Mode

Android 5.o has been well received throughout the wider technology community – providing users with many new features and an updated design. However, there’s one thing that they seem to have missed – there’s no silent mode!

On Android 4.0 and previous editions, when you hit your ‘volume down’ button on your smart phone or tablet, the phone will lower your ringer levels down from loud, to vibrate and eventually into fully silent mode. This mode apparently hasn’t made the grade into Android 5.0, kind of.

Silent mode was often used by consumers to disable the ability to hear or feel incoming phone calls, text messages or calendar notifications – the only alternative to this offered in Android 5.0 is the new “zero notification mode”. This mode gives you the ability to deaden your phone completely, allowing no alerts to get between you and your task. Apparently there is somewhat of a work-around if silent mode is important to you – simply turn you volume right up to 1, restart your device and then you’ll notice silent is available to you. It’s also noted that silent mode is available on tablet editions of Android 5.0 but not the smartphone edition.

Given this information, it looks like the no-silent ability is some form of small release bug – here’s hoping it’s fixed soon.

We’ll report if and when the story develops, here on eTeknix.

Image courtesy of Chiphell

Tenda W150M Portable Wireless Access Point & Router Review

Introduction


Recently, I’ve had a look at a few portable wireless storage devices, which as a concept are fantastic in my mind and they have taken to the markets like a storm and as a result, everyone wants to hop on the same bandwagon. Whilst these small devices are great for what they do, it goes to show that mobile products that offer the functionality of their static counterparts are a lot more handy than we may think and this leads us to the product that I have to write about today.

When travelling, having a means of connecting to the internet is vital for many people and when In most hotels, the cost of WiFi can be expensive, or where there is a wired connection available, there is only once connection at that. The idea of carrying around a wireless router for some is a good idea, but they are inherently bulky and consequently are not the most convenient of items to carry around.

Tenda are a Shenzhen based company that have been producing networking products since 1999 for the consumer, SOHO and SMB markets and just recently they have been developing a line of portable wireless routers like I have to look at today – ideal for on the go networking. With a single LAN port and powered via USB, the W150M offers up a multitude of wireless routing functions including an access point, bridge, router, WISP amongst others and with a large number of the features that you generally expect to see on a desktop router as well.

Netgear XWNB5201 500Mbps Powerline WiFi Access Point Review

Until a few months ago, I had quite a large reservation against the principle of powerline technology and up until this point I was hard fought when it came to recommending it. Thankfully though Netgear was able to change all this with the XAVB5201 kit and since then I’ve been totally converted and I can at last put my trust in the technology.

To move on from the simple principle of wired networking, where else is there to go? well the obvious answer is to eliminate the wires and this then in a way questions why one would want to use a powerline kit. Well in many instances wireless has its downfalls mainly due to signal coverage and speed and this is hence why signal boosters and wireless repeaters are available on the market. Truth be told though, wireless extenders still have their pro’s and con’s, the main one being loss of speed and increased ping. When I looked at Netgear’s WN1000RP, it did great in improving the range of my wireless network, but there was a notable drop in speed at the same time which is something that most repeaters do suffer from in varying degrees.

So this is where Netgear’s powerline WiFi Access point comes into play. Simply put it gives the best of both worlds with a point-to-point wired powerline, but also on the remote end, the plug also houses a wireless module that allows users to connect, well – wirelessly. By having the remote access point connected to the powerline directly, there is – in theory – no major loss in wireless performance.

Accompanying the two plugs that make up the powerline kit, Netgear also bundle in a pair of CAT5e patch leads, an installation guide, resource CD and conformity paperwork.