Podracing Mod for Halo 5 Isn’t Perfect but a Lot of Fun

Star Wars is an awesome book and movie series and one of the things that a lot of people would love to experience from the series besides the light sabers are the pod racers. I’m also sure that most agree that it was also one of the best things in Phantom Menace. Up until now there hasn’t been much in that direction for us gamers, sure there was the Podracing game for N64, but that’s about it. Luckily there are a lot of games that feature a great modding ability and where fans can are able to create their own pod racing games.

Modder CaptainDireWolf must be one of the people besides me that love the idea of pod racing and thanks to Halo 5’s Forge Map tools he created an almost working mod. While the mod is buggy and doesn’t fully work as a racing game, it’s still a great idea, fun to watch, and the video below is at least worth to watch.

The designer created a playable, yet limited, pod racing multiplayer mode that reminds us a lot of the Star Wars Episode 1: Podracer game for the N64. You’re able to use multiple pod racers in this mod called Boonta Eve, but you can’t really win the game. You can kill your enemies or you can just enjoy the fun of the race. One of the problems arises when you die, you can’t respawn with a racer again. All in all, it’s very simple, but that’s due to the limitations of Halo 5 more than anything else.

While this isn’t the ideal mod nor the best platform to make it on, I hope that it will inspire someone else to create a proper pod racing mod in another game, a game that is more suited for a racing mod like this. I would surely like a fun and fastpaced pod racing game for PC and I’m sure that I’m not the only one.

Netherlands First To Introduce Self Driving Shuttles To Public Roads

We’ve been hearing about them for a while. Self-driving cars are a popular thing for people, companies and countries, Companies like Google, who state that their self-driving cars are actually too safe for urban areas, and Heathrow, who operate a self-driving pod system at terminal five, it would seem that automated vehicles are going to be a big thing in the near future. While Google is testing their self-driving car on public roads it has its limits, and it would seem the Netherlands are going to be the first to introduce automated shuttles to the public roadways.

Titled WEpods, the small shuttles can fix up to six people in and are planned to run between two towns in the Netherlands. Ede and Waegeningen are about seventeen-minute drives away from one another, with the latter being a large center for farming and agricultural research thanks to its university.

The buses will be designed to go at roughly 15 miles per hour and will have a real person monitoring via camera so that if anything goes wrong they will be able to quickly respond. Set to be the first permanent public use of an automated vehicle without a dedicated human presence, the project hopes to launch on the 30th November this year.

Would you be excited by a similar project coming to where you live? Would you feel safe in a bus without a driver or would you prefer to have someone there just in case?

Thank you Gizmondo for the information. 

Image courtesy of Wageningenur.

Podulator – A Sign of Future Transport?

James May is known for a lot of things, amongst which is the show Top Gear of which he only recently stopped hosting. Known to have a keen interest in motorised vehicles, James’s latest twitter post is of a different type of vehicle.

As seen above, James seems to be at Heathrow, advertising the future of transport displayed at Terminal 5. The pod-based system allows you to travel between the station at terminal 5 and the two based in terminal 5’s car park. The system is not a new one, with it celebrating over 1 million autonomous miles back in 2013.

Featuring 3.8 kilometers of one-way track for the pods, it’s almost like a personal train between the stations. The one comparison I can draw is with trains, but the private and personal carriage like nature reminds me of the old cabin based trains, for those who have never experienced this, think about the Hogwarts train (shown below).

With companies like Google making automated cars, we could soon see Pod like cars working on a large scale, across an entire city or maybe even a country? Could companies like Uber and your local taxi soon be replaced by automated cars which you call at the press of a button?

Thank you Ultra Global PRT for providing us with this information.

Images courtesy of Ultra Global PRT and Harry Potter Wiki.

Unmanned Transport Pods To Be Deployed In Milton Keynes, UK

Milton Keynes (UK) is planning a new futuristic approach in terms of transportation. The town is preparing to replace the existing old and noisy buses with a fleet of 100 ULTra PRT transport pods. Each pod has a capacity of 2 passengers plus room for luggage and travels at a speed of 12 miles per hour. As per the initial plan, pods will carry passengers between downtown area, train station and business district. Fares are estimated to be £2 per trip and pedestrians will have to use a smartphone app to hail a pod.

The pods are driven by computers but can be controlled by passengers in case of any problem. A similar system is already in place at Heathrow airport in London and is being used for shuttling passengers from terminal to terminal. The system is operational since 2011 and there have been no major incidents so far.

With an estimated budget of £65 million, the pilot project would require laying down special roadway and charging stations for the pods. The special roadway would contain safety bumpers to separate the pods from regular traffic and charging stations would be set up en route. The current plan is to have the system up and running by 2015 and fully operational by 2017.

If everything goes well and the project succeeds, the idea is to have pods no longer run on restricted lanes, paving the way for driverless public transport systems and personal vehicles.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7OxvLuK83g[/youtube]

Thank you Tech Spot for providing us with this information
Image and video courtesy of Tech Spot