MMD Refreshes E-Line Displays with 3 New Philips Models

MMD, a leading brand license partner for Philips Monitors, announced a refreshed line-up of consumer displays with three new models. The first new monitor is a 23-inch version using an AH-IPS panel while the last two monitors feature PLS LED panels and are 24-inch and 27-inch respectively. All three of the latest E-Line displays are said to “offer vivid, true-to-life colours and wide-angle viewing, styled in an elegance-inspired design for a light, fresh face in any home or office.”

IPS panels are the preferred ones by most people, so let’s start with the 237E (237E7QDSB) 23-inch monitor. The stand and frame is a glossy black finish with edge-to-edge glass and narrow borders. The narrow borders give minimal viewing distractions and also allow easy setups with multiple monitors. For an extra sleek look, the front border is kept free of touch buttons, instead the monitor features a discreetly placed EasySelect toggle key on the rear to make quick adjustments to monitor settings. You can spot the EasySelect key on the bottom left side in the photo below.

The EasyToogle button is present on all three new monitors, also on the 24-inch 246E (246E7QDSW) and 27-inch 276E (276E7QDSW) monitors. You also get the same 178-degree viewing angles, Full-HD resolution at 60Hz, and a 250 cd/m² brightness on all three models.

Besides the difference in panel type, the three new Philips monitors are almost identical. The 24-inch and 27-inch monitors use PLS LED technology and aren’t black. Instead, they are available in a glossy white finish with a slim and elegant metal stand. Colour-wise, the two can reproduce 82% of the NTSC colour gamut.

All three displays come with technology features such as Philips Flicker-free, SmartContrast, Economy mode, and SmartImage Lite. Connection wise you get an analog VGA D-Sub connector, a digital HDCP DVI-D connector, and an MHL-HDMI connector, making them suitable for almost any system. That even goes for mobile devices that are MHL-capable. With an optional MHL cable, you can connect it directly and charge the mobile device at the same time.

The new Philips displays 237E7QDSB, 246E7QDSW and 276E7QDSW will be available at the beginning of November at £149, £159 and £219 respectively.

Samsung Reveals First Monitor With a Qi Wireless Charging Stand

Interested in something that serves more than one purpose? Samsung seems to have the same idea and has just revealed their first display with a Qi wireless charging stand. The SE370 seems to come in two sizes, a 23.6-inch and 27-inch, and provides a way to ditch the old data cable for charging your smartphone.

Samsung says that all Qi wireless charging smartphones are compatible with the stand, so there won’t be any smartphones featuring the wireless charging technology left out. The idea is quite brilliant because let’s face it, most of us want or already have a wireless charging pad on their desks. So why use more space than needed? What’s better that to have the charging station integrated into your display that will always be plugged in and on your desk?

In addition to the wireless charging feature, the display features a PLS panel, 1920 x 1080 pixel resolution, 4ms response timing and a contrast ratio of 1000:1. Besides the latter, the 23.6-inch model comes with a 250 cd/m2 brightness ratio, while the 27-inch model features a 300 cd/m2 ratio, both having a 170­° viewing angle. Also, when talking about connectivity, the SE370 seems to come with one HDMI 1.4, one DisplayPort 1.2 and one D-Sub connectivity options.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_uNw-ueAZM

The extra features found on the display consist of Eco Saving Plus, Magic Bright, Magic Upscale, Game Mode, Eye Saver Mode, Flicker Free, FreeSync, Image Size. Samsung did not mention a price or release date, but the latter information is bound to follow soon enough. Stay tuned!

Thank you Venture Beat for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of Business Korea

Confusing Assassin’s Creed: Unity GPU Recommendations and Optimising Issues

As we’re inundated with comments about Assassins Creed: Unity barely performing above 50 FPS on low settings throughout higher end graphic card offerings from NVIDIA and AMD, we’ve taken some time out to look at NVIDIA’s recommendations as to what exactly you should purchase to run Ubisoft’s latest game.

Take a look at this table and explanation below, it mentions that Unity has some pretty demanding system requirements (we wrote about it pre-release) and suggests exactly what you should expect to run to reach smooth frame-rates at full HD – 1920 x 1080 resolution.

Now we must admit, aiming for 40 FPS is pretty poor – we suggest you should be looking at around 120 FPS minimum on any game to have a fully smooth experience. But according to this table, you should be looking at a rather nice experience running your budget grade GTX 780 Ti which will set you back a pocket change amount of $570 US in today’s market. Obviously we’re being sarcastic in this remark, and it leaves us thinking if Ubisoft spent enough time optimizing their game.

Looking at the plethora of posts on Reddits PC Master Race shows that even given these minimum system requirements, the game still isn’t properly functional. Below you can see Reddit user ElliotCarter94 using his R9 290 card coupled with a i5 3570k running at 3.8GHz, only managing to achieve 39 FPS on a 640 x 480 resolution set at the lowest graphic quality.

This is coupled with other users claiming 47-52 FPS when utilizing their GTX 760’s on low settings, among other issues of console wording being unchanged when Ubisoft went through through the process of porting it to PC.

Furthermore, if you take a quick look at NVIDIA’s apparent amazing comparisons when comparing high and low settings within Unity, they provide two total comparisons set in different environments, set to display the major difference between running high or low settings. You can see example one here, and example two here. If you look closely, you’ll find that there’s basically no difference at all – what’s up with that? On top of this fact, NVIDIA are offering free Assassins Creed: Unity copies with some of their graphic cards, which begs the question – why are they offering a game which the card wont run?

Please don’t let it end like this Ubisoft, they’ve made some great games in the past – but as of recent times, they’ve really proven that they are out of touch with the community and are seemingly dragging NVIDIA down with them.

We are currently working on securing a PR contact for Ubisoft – we will continue to report as soon this happens or as the story develops.

Cover image courtesy of eTeknix

AOC Q2770PQU 27″ PLS Monitor Review

Introduction


For content writers and image editors such as myself, having a large display with a high-resolution to work on and maximise our workspace is virtually a must have and whilst a 1920 x 1080 workspace is usable, it’s not ideal – especially when you’re referencing from a data sheet or a reviewers guide. There is of course the option to have two displays side by side and this is great as it does give you the capacity to view two separate items at once with loads of space to work in, but having even more space to work within is highly sought after – in short a 1920 x 1080 resolution doesn’t quite cut it for me these days.

Going up from a standard HD resolution does mean that we generally have to go up in a physical dimension as well and above 24″ the next step is 27″. At this point we move to the 2560 x 1440 and 2560 x 1600 set of resolutions and whilst there is only a small difference in the height of each resolution, surprisingly there is a bigger gap in the price. This is part of the reason why many users stick to the standard HD workspace. Fortunately for the professional user group the number of monitors coming to market sporting the slightly lower 1440 pixel height is quickly growing and with 4K panels appearing in growing numbers, the price associated with moving up from 1920 x 1080 is dropping at a steady pace.

The Q2770PQU is one of AOC’s latest creations and like a number of their other products it’s not short of any features. On top of the 2560 x 1440 resolution, the display boasts a 80,000,000 : 1 dynamic contrast ratio, 5ms GTG (Grey to Grey) response time, 300cd/m² brightness, a pixel pitch of 0.233 x 0.233 mm and a super wide viewing angle of 178° (horizontal & vertical) – all from a LED backlit PLS panel. Top this off with a set of built-in 2W speakers, DVI-D, VGA, HDMI and DisplayPort inputs, a height adjustable and rotatable stand and finally a pair of USB2.0 & USB3.0 ports and what you’ve got is one mouth-watering package.

Like the spec list, the accessory set is by no means short-staffed. A cable for DVI, VGA and DisplayPort connectivity is available along with a 3.5mm to 3.5mm audio cable and a USB3.0 host cable. A regional kettle lead is also bundled in with a CD and user manual to get you up and running.

Aside from the accessories, I will make a note that the box suggests that this is an IPS panel and not a PLS as listed. I can confirm that this is a PLS panel and any sources that list IPS are incorrect – all other listed specifications for this panel are correct – an error was made during the beta stages for this product that resulting in review samples having IPS printed boxes – all final production boxes and sources have been corrected.