Huawei: 5G Will Be Here By 2020 – Speeds Up To 100X Faster Than 4G

4G has now been implemented around the globe in major cities for just over a year now. Looking for constant advancement in technology, Huawei have claimed that their new 5G infrastructure and technology will reach 100 times the speed of 4G by the year 2020.

As we reported, Huawei have announced their plans for a 4.5G opening in China by 2016, so this information coming to light is quite interesting. Will 4.5G still be worked on, or is Huawei looking to skip it and reach straight for the stars? 4.5G is set to provide the average user with 100Mbps speeds stable and support up to 30,000,000 connections per tower – set to be somewhat of a ‘patch’ for the current 4G offering, which often experiences connectivity, signal and data transfer issues.

In comes 5G, claiming a 10Gps peak transfer speed – quite possibly faster than your phone can process. Coming from backward Australia, I can only dream of a day when internet will out-perform things like your computers HDD speeds or LAN infrastructure – with 5G in the pipeline, it seems like somewhat of a reality.

As with all new major advancements in technology from 4K cable streaming to 10km data “fricken lasers”, the cost of the research, installment and implementation is always something to consider. Taking a look at 4G speeds currently, they’re amazing and offer the user with speeds that are likely much faster than their current ADSL2+ offering, but are extremely expensive. An Australian eSports group called ACL PRO often experience issues with venue internet being poor in Australia – meaning that they have to run their StarCraft II tournaments via multiple 4G ‘wireless sticks’ – seeing hundreds of dollars worth of data transfer flushed down the drain per event. Wouldn’t it be amazing if one day, we could do away with home line ADSL style internet and simply power our whole houses infrastructure simply by walking inside with our mobile phone? Until then, enjoy thousands of dollars a month in downloads of shareware programs and creative commons music through your 4G connection – if you can even get one.

Back to the topic at hand, 5G is set to allow you to reach speeds of up to 10Gpbs, we’ve decided to list out the speeds below to give you an easily viewable comparison of past and future technology.

  • 2G: A few hundred k per second
  • 3G: Up to a few M per second
  • 4G: Two hundred M per second
  • 5G:  10Gbps

Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Chief Engineer Zhang Feng has announced that the global information and communications industry is ushering in a new wave of innovation, cloud computing, networking and other technologies alongside the rapid redevelopment of new applications. All said to be supported by an amazing 5G mobile internet infrastructure.

We will continue to report as the story develops.

Image courtesy of TNW

USA Intends to Provide Internet to Villages via Laser

According to US technology news website, TechnologyReview, several US communications carriers are going to pilot a technology which will see a laser beam internet up to speeds of 2 Gbps through the air – meaning underground cables don’t need to be laid. This advanced laser and millimeter wave technology is said to be a replacement for conventional fiber, utilized in situations where the population is sparsely populated – including remote US towns and African Villages.

Why not mobile technology? The reports claim that although mobile technology is generally a good alternative, cables will still need to be run to telephone towers tracing to the ‘internet backbone’  – providing a huge cost for manufacturers. This new laser and millimeter technology will allow these US communications carriers to beam a data transmission at a distance of up to 10 kilometers without the need to dig trenches or erect towers. The first countries to be testing this technology are the United States, Mexico, Nigeria and some parts of Africa.

AOptix is the original inventor of this capability, claiming that they believe laser communications will provide an ideal alternative to optical fiber – once again due to the costing nature of laying cables. Data shows that in New York City, the cost of laying just one kilometer of fiber optic cable can cost up to $800,000.

This isn’t a simple point a to point b device either. AOptix claims that you can set up multiple devices to be set as a relay, allowing for 10km worth of transmission to take place per unit. There are a few possible issues with this technology that they haven’t covered in their releases however. How much do these units cost and do they need line-of-sight?

The announcement of this new technology also could have military use, but we’re very interested to know if it needs direct line-of-sight to function.

Image courtesy of Chiphell