SilverStone Releases ES01 Remote PC Switch Kit

Have you ever wished to turn your computer on and off from afar, much in the same way that you do when you unlock your car with your remote key? Well you can’t have been the only one as SilverStone just released the ES01 that is just that. The SilverStone ES01 is a remote switch for your PC that allows you to turn it on and off from a distance of up to 20 meters.

The SilverStone ES01 is a 2.4GHz wireless computer power and reset remote switch and that in itself says most. The receiver is in the form of a PCI-Express card and SilverStone included both a normal and a low-profile expansion cover. While the PCI-Express bus is the normal connector these days, in the past it was the previous PCI slot that dominated the machines. SilverStone also released a normal PCI version, so make sure you get the right one for your system. This in return means that you should be able to use this card and remote control for pretty much any system you wish, new or old and small or big.

The included Y-cable for the power and reset buttons make sure that you don’t have to rely solely on this remote control and can continue to use your normal case buttons as you did before you installed this card.

As previously mentioned, the SilverSTone ES01 has a range of up to 20 meters and the interference should be minimal on this band, but objects that are in the way will effect the range. The ES01 has an Effective Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP) of 2.76 dBm and the remote runs on a nomral CR2025 button battery.

The new SilverStone ES01 (SST-ES01-PCIe / SST-ES01-PCI) will be available around the world during this week and can be yours for a suggested end-user price of $14.96 USD

Samsung Give Their SSD’s a New Speed Standard

 

Samsung’s latest release to the SSD Market is the 950 Pro SSD. It is the fastest consumer SSD the company have ever made for the consumer grade market. Samsung have managed to achieve a whole new level of speed into their flash storage by incorporating V-NAND and NVMe technology, the device uses NVMe rather than AHCI to communicate with the storage controller, many SSDs use the much older AHCI protocol to communicate with the storage controller; this was designed 11 years ago in 2004 by Intel for standard spinning platter hard drives.

The 950 Pro can offer sequential read speeds of up to 2500 MBps and sequential write speeds as fast as 1500MBps. That’s pretty impressive in my opinion, the new model is more than four times the read speed of its predecessor, the 850 Pro, and three times the write speed. It even beats their previous top performer, the OEM-only SM951, in terms of read speed.

The 950 Pro will be available in retailers this October, with prices for the 256GB version starting at £130, and £230 for the 512GB model.

The 950 Pro also uses the newer M.2 form factor, meaning it won’t be usable unless you have a motherboard with one of the m2 connectors. Most motherboards have this nowadays but it’s something to bear in mind when buying one.

Thanks to The Verge for providing us with this information.

Plextor Booth @ CeBIT 2015

So we’re here at CeBIT 2015 with Plextor. They brought along today two test benches featuring their M6e PCI SSD drive and their M7e MSATA SSD.

We’ve seen this technology before at CES, but it’s definitely worth mentioning the serious speed increase using the PlexTurbo application to get massive speed increases. We see in the image below, over 8GB/s read speeds and over 7GB/s write speed. To put that in perspective, roughly an hour episode of Breaking Bad at 1080p is roughly 1GB rounded down; this drive can transfer 8 episodes a second at that speed.

We look forward to new innovative technology brought forward by Plextor in the near future. Any news or events from Plextor, we will keep you updated. We even heard rumour that Version 3 of their drive may be ready in time for Computex, but we’ll have to wait and see!

ASUS With All New White PCB Motherboard

ASUS have announced their new iteration of the white, Sabertooth series. Containing a white PCB and named the Sabertooth Mk S, this hot piece of tech is created on the Z97 platform and was previously seen under the codename ‘Sabranco’ at Computex in Taipei, Taiwan this year.

Similar in style to their previous white PCB models, the new version is said to offer a shroud and metal back plate both containing a snow camouflage design. The shroud design contains a small fan to help keep your board cool, alongside this board offering an advanced and extended shroud covering when compared to previous models.

As for features, the Sabertooth Mk S will feature four slots of dual channel DDR3 capable RAM bays, three PCI-E 3.0 x16 slots and 3 PCI-E 2.0 x1 slots to enable different methods of SLI or Crossfire configurations. The board also has your data storage covered with eight SATA 6Gbps ports, four USB 3.0 ports, four USB 2.0 ports and supports display outputs of HDMI and Display Port and LAN capabilities through it’s two Gigabit Ethernet ports.

The shroud covering is said by ASUS to be manufacturerd to cover the generally ugly components located within a motherboard, allowing for a sleek and neat design.

This board offers a very love or hate style design we feel, the specifications of the board are rather impressive but it’s a little sad that DDR4 isn’t yet incorporated.

We’d love to see any white case mods that you may have at eTeknix, please feel free to send us PM with some images and we may very well share them on our social media.

Image courtesy of Chiphell

Asus PCE-AC68 802.11ac Dual-Band PCI Express Wireless Adaptor Review

Introduction


Following on from my review on Asus’ top performing wireless AC router, the RT-AC68U that we looked at not too long ago, it is only worth us taking a closer look at what makes this next generation wireless adaptor tick. Unless your laptop or desktop system has built-in wireless, there is one of two main options out there for you to choose from in order to add the freedom to your system that is wireless networking. The first of these methods is to get a USB based device which is a simple device with very little setup required – literally plug it in, install the driver and you’re away. In addition a USB adaptor is compatible with both notebook and desktop systems and they are not overly expensive either. Like most things though there is a downside to going down the USB path; whilst they are able to deliver some highly respectable levels of performance, the antenna is either very small, or internal to the adaptor and therefore signal strength can be an issue.

The second main path to go down when going wireless is go with a PCI Express add-on card; obviously there is the immediate downside in that you’re not going to shoehorn one of these into your notebook system – so it’s USB only on that one I’m afraid, but for the desktop system there are a couple of perks in going down this route. The first of these is that you don’t lose another USB port on the rear or front of your case, but more importantly the antennae are bigger and on the PCE-AC68 there are three of them with a magnetic base plate on offer to maximise the signal strength and speed of your connection to the router. Sounds good huh?

Inside the box alongside the brightly coloured card Asus give us a VIP warranty note, driver CD and quick setup guide, three external antennae, a magnetic base plate with a long SMA extension cable and a half-height PCI back plate.

OCZ Launches RevoDrive 350 PCIe SSD

OCZ’s RevoDrive line of SSDs have been at the forefront of the enthusiast market for quite some time now and with M.2 drives starting to push past the limits of the SATA specification, OCZ have announced the released of their latest pure PCI Express SSD; the RevoDrive 350.

Built to run through the PCIe Gen 2.0 x8 interface, the 350 offers up to 960GB of raw storage space with sequential speeds of up to 1.8GB/s within reach along with IOPs of up to 140,000 4K random write. To achieve these phenomenal speeds, the 350 play’s host to up to four LSI SF-2282 controllers and a spread of Toshiba’s 19nm NAND following their acquisition not too long ago.

Unlike previous generations of the RevoDrive and OCZ’s other PCI Express based drives, the 350 is built to target a wide-spread of market, ranging from the enthusiast gamer right up to the enterprise market where IOPs and drive longevity is key.

In addition the RevoDrive 350 will only appear as a single drive to the host system rather than multiple drives as seen previously. This is made possible through a new proprietary system known as Virtualised Controller Architecture (VCA) 2.0. In effect this will blend together the multiple controllers to provide greater performance to the system whilst using fewer resources – much like having four cores in a desktop processor.

OCZ’s Senior VP Daryl Lang stated; “The new RevoDrive 350 is built using proven technology with the added benefit of utilizing in-house premium Toshiba flash and OCZ’s proprietary Virtualized Controller Architecture (VCA) 2.0 to deliver highly efficient performance aggregation while reducing the burden on host resources.  This next generation PCIe SSD is the ideal solution for performance-minded users looking to maximize both bandwidth and density for the complete gamut of gaming, content creation and workstation applications.”

With its sleek new design and superior performance figures, the 350 certainly looks the part and on paper it sounds great, we’ll just have to wait a little longer to see what the cost will be and when they will be available. We know historically that the RevoDrive has included a strong price tag, but with the price of NAND coming down in addition to being produced in-house, we could potentially see a more desirable price tag when the drive arrives on the shelves.

Source: Press Release

Plextor M6e 512GB PCI Express Solid State Drive Review

Introduction


Over the last few years, virtually all of the solid state drives that I’ve looked at and put through their paces have been part of the SATA III family of drives and whilst I have seen the performance levels come forward in leaps and bounds, there has always been a certain plateau of performance that was going to be reached eventually. Today’s SATA III SSDs have, for quite some time now, been able to max out and saturate the bandwidth that the interface has had to offer and this has left manufacturers with a strong challenge of how to improve the solid state drive as we know it and squeeze out better IOPs performance and improve the NAND itself to give a better life span as far as read/write cycles are concerned. To say the least we are literally at the limits of what can be done on the SATA III interface – so the real question that one would ask is where do we go from here? One path would be to bring out a new SATA standard – lets call it SATA IV; but to do this would require a lot of work and the cost of the products at the end of it could be potentially jaw dropping, so for now lets wait for a new standard to brew at a lower rate and let it slowly trickle into the market.

So with upgrading the SATA standard out of the question for new, we start to look at how else we can let the SSD run free and this brings us to PCI Express. Having a PCIe mounted drive is not a new concept by any means, after all OCZ got their footsteps into this market years ago with the RevoDrive and even when we look at the latest model, the RevoDrive 3 X2 – the performance that is on offer is way past the levels that we can get from a SATA interface. Whilst PCIe SSDs are not common place on the consumer market at this moment in time, over the last couple of years they have become a popular product in the enterprise market, partly due to the increased bandwidth, but more importantly due to their greater capacities that a single drive can offer and also superior IOPs performance, which in the enterprise market is far more important than sequential speeds.

Coming back down to the consumer level, advances in SSD technology have seen the mSATA interface mature and with the unveiling of the NGFF (Next Generation Form Factor) drive late last year, we are now watching drives push past the lucrative caps of SATA III. Once again the gates have been flung wide open as manufacturers start to hop onto the PCIe bandwagon to take storage to the next level.

Coming over to Plextor’s addition to the new trend, the drive that I’m taking a look at today is part of the M6 family of drives, which is home to three different types of drive. The first drive in this family is a traditional 2.5″ SATA drive, whilst a smaller mSATA spin-off provides compatibility with compact devices such as notebooks and ultra-compact desktop systems. The third drive to make up the group is the M6e – a NGFF drive that is mounted on to a PCIe backplane, giving it the freedom to open up the throttle and take speed and performance well over that of SATA.

The M6e comes in a well padded box in an anti-static bag and aside from the drive, Plextor include a quick installation guide and a VIP booklet.