Toyota Reveal New Concept For Hydrogen Powered Car

We live in a wonderful age, we’ve begun to create technology that merges both the digital and the real world together in augmented reality and even where people can drive a metal car powered by sunlight. The human imagination has created and continues to create an amazing array of technologies, and Toyota have shown off some ideas they might play with in the future.

At the Tokyo Motor show, they revealed images of two design concepts, which are both futuristic and yet one is also classic in a way. First off, have a look at the present, with the S-FR. Looking similar to modern-day cars now, this model could soon be at your door steps.

Next, however, is the parent of design, with clear inspirations from the days of old we were presented with the Kikai.

Looking like a modern take on a classic hot rod the revealed engine leaves little to the car fanatics imagination. Finally, the last design is one from the future and is quite simply titled the FCV Plus.

Not only does the FCV feature a very futuristic look but it is designed to run some rather interesting technology.

For example, it would powered purely by hydrogen and that power would be diverted to four individual electric motors that are housed in each of the wheels. This means that aside from the fuel tank and cells located either at the front or back of the car, all the rest is freed up for the passengers.

Could you see yourself getting into a FCV within the next ten years? What about the S-FR and Kikai, would you like to own any of these vehicles?

Thank you Engadget for the information and images.

No More Data Roaming Charges in EU from 2017

Nothing can sour the vacation more that roaming charges, but that will soon be a thing of the past in the European Union as a new law will abolish those charges by June 2017 after a 14-month interim period. That is the new deal reached on Tuesday with the aim to bring the Europe Union another step closer.

You’ll of course not get it completely free, but you will be able to use roaming a lot cheaper. With the new rules, telecom operators are only able to charge you €0.05 extra per minute for calls, 0.02 extra per SMS sent, and 0.05 extra per megabyte of data. Whether they charge this or not is up to each individual company, but we should expect to pay the full amount on almost any network.

The new cap would make roaming within the Europe Union up to 75% cheaper during the interim period, the European Commission said. All of this is a culmination of years of campaigning for net neutrality within the EU and partly a follow-up to the US adoption of net-neutrality.

All internet traffic also has to be treated equally, but regulations are possible in situations such as counter-terrorism.

This is great news for anyone who travels a lot, but even more for someone like me that lives right up at the border and travels two countries equally.

Thank You BBC for providing us with this information

Take A Blast Back To The Past With Google BBS

For a number of us tech heads, we all like to take a trip back to the good ol’ days of dial up internet and reminisce on how things used to be. Whilst many sites – such as Google – can into the world much later than the 80’s some people wonder what things would have been like back then. Well fear not as Google has been ported to the old BBS style courtesy of the guys over at masswerk.at.

It is worth noting that this is not an official page from Google themselves, but instead a third-party creation that ports Google into the style of the 80’s desktop. Whilst there is no real function of this page and when compared to today’s standards is a millions miles away from the layout, it is a great tool in some respects for teaching the children of today what computing in the past was like.

It’s simple & fun and I’m sure there is a likely hood you’ll spend a good amount of time having fun with the image search. Do you remember what things were like back then? Can you think of any other sites that would be interesting to see in an 80’s format? Let us know below.

Source: masswerk