World of Tanks Japanese Advert is Quite Ballsy

Video game advertisements can be cringeworthy, emotionally-charging and in the case of World of Tanks, downright bizarre. To be fair, it’s better than many gaming adverts in the UK and uniqueness is always a good quality. Up to this point, the video has amassed over 3 million views and continues to do rather well. Japan’s culture might seem strange to some westerners, but it’s a beautiful country. I’m not entirely convinced this type of marketing would do well with World of Tank’s western core demographic though.

The rating system and comments have been disabled and that’s probably for the best. I can only imagine the type of discussions on the video trailer. I wonder how many players in Japan will feel compelled to try the game after the advert and how provocative it is to Japanese gamers.

This unique trailer revolves around a Japanese lady painting. The final piece shownis certainly suggestive, but don’t worry, it’s just about safe for work, but you may get some strange looks if seen watching it… enjoy!

We would love to hear your thoughts on this advert and gaming adverts in general. What is the worst and best gaming trailer you’ve ever seen?

Want to see more crazy gaming adverts? Check out our Classic Gaming Commercials Were Awesome! feature.

12-Year-Old Boy Breaks Fall by Smashing Into Painting Worth $1.5 Million

A 12-year-old boy in Taiwan has suffered a rather unfortunate accident and already become a viral sensation. While visiting a museum, he suddenly tripped into the path of a $1.5 million painting. The damage caused was quite substantial because he pierced a hole in the painting to break his fall. Unluckily, the Paolo Porpora oil painting is 350 years old and provided to the museum on a loan basis. Additionally, the piece was part of “The Face of Leonardo, Images of a Genius” exhibition, with 50 beautifully compiled paintings by Italian Renaissance artists on display.

CCTV footage recorded the incident which is fairly difficult to watch. Organizers of the event had to close the public gallery and assess the situation. However, it was reopened a few hours later. Focus Taiwan reported that the exhibition’s curator, Andrea Rossi does not want the boy’s family to pay for restoration costs. Obviously, how could they afford it? Thankfully, the painting was insured by the organizers and will be repaired in Taiwan before going back to Italy.

Also, the museum probably should have imposed greater restrictions and improved security. As you can see from the video, the boy is carrying a drink. He could have easily dropped the beverage and stained the painting. Whatever the case, you have to feel some sympathy for him.

Thank you Mashable for providing us with this information.

Machine Vision Algorithm May Be the next Art Critic

Art historians still find defining art and its creative qualities tricky even today. Art has always been considered something that a human mind can understand and appreciate, but is it really?

A simplified definition of what makes one of the best pieces of art stand out is that they need to have a key element which inspired later artists to use in their own work.

Two researchers at the Rutgers University tend to disagree that humans are the only ones who can judge art. Based on a machine vision algorithm, they proved that paintings can be studied and judged by computers too.

The researchers put it to a test and fed the code a database of about 62,000 pictures of fine art paintings. The results achieved consisted in the computer recognising Monet’s Haystacks at Chailly at sunrise as being one of the most influential paintings in history.

Art critics would agree with the above and state that Rodin’s 1889 sculpture Danaid is not as influential as the machine deems too. But does this really mean a computer can judge fine art now?

The truth is that arguments between critics on determining the most influential pieces of art have been going on for ages now, but this algorithm could prove to be a basis on which they can agree upon.

The algorithm uses visual concepts that analyses both low-key elements, such as colour, texture and simple objects, as well as high-key elements like walking, smiling and so on. A computer then applies the algorithm to a database pool and comes up with the paintings which influenced other authors.

Also, the researchers tell us that the algorithm has bigger potential than just showing a list of paintings. They say that the algorithm can be used in other areas, such as literature, sculpture and even in science.

Thank you MIT Technology Review for providing us with this information

Image courtesy of hdwallpaperpc

Artist Paints Poop Portrait of Mark Zuckerberg

A Brooklyn artist and hacker, known only as KATSU, has created a large portrait of Facebook creator and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, painted with his own faeces. The poop portrait is on display in The Hole gallery in New York, as part of the artist’s first solo exhibition, called “Remember the Future”.

KATSU has quite the Zuckerberg fetish: in April 2013, he littered the walls of New York City with posters of the Facebook Maestro’s face, doctored to give him a black eye. The artist revealed to Gizmodo why Zuckerberg is his favourite target, saying, “Mark is Mark. He’s this mutation, this gross aspiration everyone idolizes. His face has reach. He deserves to be ridiculed.”

Source: Mashable

See Famous Paintings as Raw Data

Now we all know how much effort can go into a painting by a person, but exactly how much goes into a painting by a computer? Japanese artist Yousuke Ozawa set out to demonstrate that by creating a series of artwork that showcases some of history’s most famous pieces in raw data.

Yes, what you’re seeing above is the legendary painting ‘The Scream’ converted into its raw data. The idea of the artwork is to showcase just how much code is behind an amazing painting such as that and how computers intricately replicate the work of the artist on our screens.

“Art is now seen through google images or wallpapers. However, we are actually looking at a series of numbers and letters instead of actual paint. Through a generator I retrieved the codes of each paintings I found on google images and printed them out, framed and showcased them at a galleries in Tokyo.” – Yousuke Ozawa

The pieces have been displayed in Tokyo, but we can all see them (not entirely in raw data thankfully) on Ozawa’s website.

Source: Data Visualization Via: Gizmodo