Belgians Aid Police With Cat Pictures

After the recent events in Paris, police in Belgium have been operating to find Salah Abdeslam, a suspect in the Paris attacks. The operations came to a height on Sunday when a search of Brussels was conducted amid requests from the police for people to not post information about their activities.

So how did the internet respond? By tweeting cat pictures! The hash tag #BrusselsLockdown became awash with images of kittens as people swamped out any reports of police activity amongst a sea of kittens.

The initial tweet reads as follows:

This (roughly) translates as:

For safety, please observe the radio silence on social media regarding ongoing police operating in Brussels. Thank you

The public’s response was simply amazing with the following tweets showing that not only do they care, they will do anything to help hinder those who weren’t willing to listen.

 

 

The police even posted this message in response to the overwhelming public support for their actions:

This translates to:

For cats who helped us last night, help yourself!

With both the public and the police using social media to not only help one another but also to help calm and entertain others in a time like this it goes to show that the internet does have a good side.

Thank you to the BBC for bringing these amazingly heroic cats to light.

DARPA Working on Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel

DARPA is said to be working on an Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel (ACTUV) program, which is said to be the first robotic autonomous vessel designed to locate and track even the most quiet diesel submarines at the most extreme depths.

The national security, health and engineering company, Leidos, is part of the DARPA program tasked with building the ACTUV. Based in Reston, Virginia, the company is said to have been granted the ‘OK’ back in February in order to start work on the autonomous unmanned vessel, having it built at Christensen Shipyard in Vancouver, Washington, under the supervision of Leidos and Oregon Iron Works. Actual work on the vessel is said to take 15 months, with a launch date set for 2015 on the Columbia River.

“ACTUV’s advanced sensor technology should allow for continuous surveillance which, combined with the vessel architecture and design, is expected to provide autonomous safe navigation supporting Navy missions around the world,” says Leidos Group President, John Fratamico.

The ACTUV is said to be built out of carbon composite, using a modular design and a parallel workflow method in order to speed up assembly. In addition to the latter, the ACTUV is equipped with navigation and piloting sensors, electro-optics, as well as long and short-range radar. Leidos states tat the ACTUV’s modular design allows it to carry out anti-submarine warfare operations, having the ability to be refitted for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions as well.

Thank you Gizmag for providing us with this information
Image courtesy of Gizmag