Microsoft Built a Datacenter at the Bottom of The Pacific Ocean

Building a datacenter can be a costly and time-consuming endeavor, but the latest project from Microsoft may have solved quite a few problems all at once. Typically it can take two years to build a datacenter on land, and even then you’ll find that they need to be built quite far from built-up residential areas and city centers, which then leads to increased latency for users. Then you’ve also got the issue of cooling the datacenter, as all that hardware generates a lot of heat and the cost of cooling it can quickly become a headache. Microsoft’s solution to all of this? Build the datacenter at the bottom of the ocean!

While it may seem like a wacky idea, it’s pretty clever. The ocean water is a very efficient way of cooling the datacenter and it’s passive too, so there are no ongoing running costs for the cooling as there would be in a building that used air conditioning systems. Microsoft said that during their testing, they observed no heading of the marine environment beyond a few inches of the device, so there should be no major impact from these units.

Microsoft’s Project ‘Leona Philpot’ was deployed about 1 kilometer off the pacific coast, where it stayed for 105 days and worked perfectly. Having it deployed in water like this means that it can be located close to populated areas, reducing latency and not taking up valuable land space around cities. What better, for Microsoft at least, is that these units can be deployed in just 90 days, much quicker than land-based datacenters. Microsoft’s researchers are already working on a follow-up to Leona Philpot, where they will deploy a unit three times the size and perform further tests. It will be interesting to see how well these datacenters perform and if they’ll become more popular than the current land based ones although we suspect that may not be for a long time.

Adidas Creating 3D-Printed Shoes From Old Plastic

We are constantly reminded about the world around us and sometimes our impact on it for the worse. Companies and countries alike are looking for ways to create a better world by first reducing our impact on it, from solar energy to recycling companies are looking at new and amazing ways to help improve the world. Adidas is looking to use recycling to help not only save the planet but also give you some new footwear.

Made from some of the ocean plastics and gillnets, the wall of netting that you typically use to catch fish, the new pair of trainers aren’t just looking at using old materials. Futurecraft 3D is the name given to Adidas’s 3D printing technology exploration, meaning instead of crafting your shoes they will instead be printed to your requirements.

While no release date has been set for the shoes making it to the public market, can you imagine what this could mean? Are your feet odd sizes? How about that toe that always seems to dig into the side of any shoe you wear? Custom shoes, using recycled components meaning its better for the environment and quicker, you could even walk into a shoe store and custom order a pair which they print while you have your lunch.

Two Headed Dolphin Washes up on Turkish Beach

Firstly, sorry for the rather grim image you’re looking at, it’s the only one of the creature and secondly, before you all say “this isn’t technology news!”, I know, but something as strange as this has to be brought to peoples attention.

Now I’m sure we’ve all heard about conjoined twins being born in the news, they are so rare that if they live beyond 5 seconds then everyone has to know about it. Now it seems that the same has happened with a dolphin, or is that dolphins? A conjoined Dolphin was found dead on the shores of Turkey by a tourist visiting the area, scientists aren’t exactly sure how old the Dolphin was before it died but an estimate of 12 months has been given, it was around 3.2 ft long and according to the man who found the corpse, one of its eyes had not properly formed, poor thing.

The deceased dolphin will be studied by a marine biologist names Mehmet Gokoglu from Akdeniz University. The scientist says that a conjoined dolphin is very rare.

Thanks to Tweaktown for supplying us with this information.

Image courtesy of Tweaktown.