Nicaraguan President Claims FBI Are Spying On Obama

Nicaragua’s president Daniel Ortega has warned U.S president Barack Obama that the FBI is spying on him. At a 34th Sandinista Revolution anniversary speech he stated that:

“I tell President Obama to take care…for sure they are spying on him”

He elaborated further that the Obama administration and high level officials and lawmakers are all being spied on by the FBI. He also claims the FBI’s first director John Edgar Hoover initiated a tradition of spying on presidential candidates. Daniel Ortega believes that the FBI files their “dirty laundry” on American politicians so that they hold power over them through blackmail. This apparently means Barack Obama has no control over the USA’s intelligence apparatus and hence how it is now so out of hand.

Daniel Ortega also slammed the USA for its disproportionate response to Edward Snowden’s revelations:

“I wonder what else he [Snowden] knows? How much horrifying information is there that they want to prosecute and convict him in the US, where the death penalty is an option?”

Image courtesy of AFP PHOTO/ELMER MARTINEZ

USA Applying Diplomatic Pressure To Latin America To Reject Snowden

 

In an attempt to prevent Edward Snowden from seeking asylum in Latin America the USA is applying diplomatic pressure to Latin American countries such as Nicaragua, Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador and others. Nicaragua, Venezuela and Bolivia have already made formal offers of asylum to Edward Snowden and the USA is trying to ensure that no other sympathisers get on board with the NSA whistleblower.

A NY Times report suggests that the USA has been threatening Latin American countries. They have stated that letting Edward Snowden in would “have lasting consequences” and “would put relations in a very bad place for a long time to come”. Furthermore they state that all state governments understand their position right now and should do their best to support the USA in bring Snowden back to the USA for trial.

Despite these threats it seems unlikely that Latin America will give way to American pressure any time soon as Ecuador and Venezuela have already publicly condemned the USA, Cuba have backed the actions of Latin America and at the UNASUR (Union of South American Nations) meeting last week the overwhelming consensus was anti-USA.

We wonder what options the USA has left before it has to resort to dirty-tactics like anti-competitive trade practices or military expeditions.

Image courtesy of brlatina.com

NSA Spied On Countries In Latin America

The NSA has been spying on the whole world, that’s not news to anyone. However, on the back of the USA trying to exert pressure on Latin America to not accept Edward Snowden’s asylum these latest revelations could deal a fatal blow to the USA. O Globo reports that the USA has been spying extensively on Latin America. Countries like Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador (and probably the rest of Latin America) have all been regular spying targets of the NSA.

Apparently the NSA hasn’t limited its spying operations to just military affairs and has also been stealing trade secrets from the Latin American oil industry, notably Venezuela. Latin America was targeted by “PRISM” and “Boundless Informant”. PRISM enables access to emails, chat logs and voice calls through American-based internet companies and Boundless Informant is capable of cataloguing phone calls and internet access.

The USA reportedly used PRISM to collect data regarding oil and military purchases fropm Venezuela and energy and narcotics from Mexico. Other victims of “lower level” spying were Venezuela, Argentina, Ecuador, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Paraguay, Chile, Peru and El Salvador. No doubt this latest revelation will spur more Latin American countries into offering Edward Snowden asylum. Investigations are already taking in Brazil over the reported intelligence breaches.

Image courtesy of Gringos.com

 

Bolivia Join Venezuela And Nicaragua In Offering Snowden Asylum

During a speech yesterday Evo Morales officially offered NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden, political asylum in his country Bolivia. Quoted in El Comercio Morales said that

“As a protest, we just want to say to the Europeans and Americans that we will give asylum to this US citizen that is being persecuted by his compatriots. We are not afraid.”

He mentioned that if Edward Snowden made the official request they would grant him asylum. This suggests that Snowden is yet to formally request asylum from Bolivia. Interestingly Snowden has now applied for asylum in 27 countries according to WikiLeaks and these  have been met with mainly rejections but recently Edward Snowden was offered asylum by Venezuela and Nicaragua taking his total number of options now to three, all Latin American countries.

With the options coming in rather quickly now, with just 3 in 2 days, expect Snowden to get a few more offers as more countries follow in the footsteps of the Latin American nations.

Still the fact remains that even if Snowden takes asylum in Venezuela, Bolivia or Nicaragua he still has to get safe passage there without his flight being intercepted.

Image courtesy of CNN.com

Nicaragua And Venezuela Offer Edward Snowden Political Asylum

Edward Snowden received a flurry of asylum rejections in the past week as European nations stumbled over themselves to make excuses to protect their interests with the USA despite overwhelming public support for offering Snowden asylum in Europe. Furthermore, as of three days ago Snowden had over 10 rejections from 21 applications. However, Snowden has finally received some offers courtesy of two Latin American nations according to Russia Today.

First up is Nicaragua and just yesterday evening Nicaragua’s president Daniel Ortega stated that:

“We are open, respectful of the right to asylum, and it is clear that if circumstances permit it, we would receive Snowden with pleasure and give him asylum here in Nicaragua”

Furthermore, Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro also pledged to offer Edward Snowden asylum in the spirit of Venezuela’s tradition of fighting “imperial North American prosecution”. Rather fittingly Nicolas Maduro made such a televised speech on Venezuela’s independence day.

“I have decided to offer humanitarian asylum to the young American, Edward Snowden, so that in the fatherland of (Simon) Bolivar and (Hugo) Chavez, he can come and live away from the imperial North American persecution”

With two asylum offers from Nicaragua and Venezuela Edward Snowden now has two safe havens to flee from American persecution until things settle down in the USA. We expect that more nations will now follow the same path and offer Edward Snowden asylum. The battle is still not over though as Snowden needs to be able to get from Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport to either Venezuela or Nicaragua without crossing airspace of nations that may choose to ground his flight and then extradite him to the USA where he could face an extensive jail term or possibly even the death penalty.

Image courtesy of the Guardian

Snowden’s Asylum Options: 1 Withdrawn 10 Rejected 10 Pending

According to reports by RT.com Snowden’s options for political asylum are rapidly evaporating. The NSA whistleblower has withdrawn his application for Asylum to Russia after they told him he could only have asylum if he stopped “damaging” the USA, a condition he was not prepared to agree to. Furthermore Finland, Brazil, Poland, India and Germany all rejected his asylum claim outright stating they were not willing to accept him. Spain, Norway, Italy, Ecuador and Austria also rejected Snowden’s asylum request on the grounds that he had to be already inside the country for it to be processed. These rejections bring the total numbers of rejections to 10, and with the single withdrawal, 11 of Snowden’s options have already been vaporised.

So what options are left for the NSA whistleblower? Well he still has Bolivia, China, Cuba, France, Iceland, Ireland, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Switzerland and Venezuela left to reply. Of those ten remaining options China says it is not aware of the request and France has denied ever receiving such an Asylum request and since they also recently blocked a Bolivian Jet from flying through their airspace because of suspicions that Edward Snowden was onboard it could easily turn out that France will reject the request too.

As of writing the most likely nations to accept seem to be Venezuela and Bolivia after they both expressed anti-USA sentiments and stated their willingness to protect Snowden.

Image courtesy of the Guardian

Snowden Releases List Of Countries Contacted For Political Asylum Requests

While it is now relatively common knowledge that the famous internet surveillance NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden is stuck in Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport, it hasn’t been well documented where he was seeking political asylum up until now. We’ve known he has been in talks with Ecuador, but with that starting to unfold who else has he been trying to seek political asylum with? Well surprisingly his options aren’t as limited as you might think. According to an official statement made by the whistleblower organisation WikiLeaks Edward Snowden has applied for political asylum in the following nation-states:

  • Austria
  • Bolivia
  • Brazil
  • China
  • Cuba
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • India
  • Italy
  • Ireland
  • The Netherlands
  • Nicaragua
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Russia (where he is situated now)
  • Spain
  • Switzerland
  • Venezuela

Surprisingly, Ecuador is now off the list after President Correa seems to be bowing to American pressure. He has gone from pledging his support to Snowden at all costs to saying that he now offered Snowden help “by mistake”. It is also worth noting that Russia have also refused to offer Edward Snowden political asylum unless he stops releasing documents that are harming the USA.

Edward Snowden is currently seeking asylum on the grounds of persecution risk if he is forced to return back to the USA.

We will be sure to keep you updated with how this goes for Edward Snowden. He is easily becoming one of the most important figures of our generation.

Image courtesy of the Guardian